Amazon Opens Online Drone Store, Ensures Flying Robot Apocalypse

Amazon Opens Online Drone Store, Ensures Flying Robot Apocalypse

Amazon Prime Air 310x

New Amazon portal has everything a drone enthusiast could ask for.

Oh how grand it would be if every city and town had a drone shop -- a DroneShack, if you will (that's some solid free advice right there, RadioShack). It might take some time before Everytown, USA has a Mom & Pop Drone Shoppe, but Amazon will do in a pinch, right?

Amazon has officially opened its latest eCommerce initiative -- the Amazon Drone Store. The new portal, part of the larger Amazon store online, wants to be the one-stop shopping arena for drone beginners and enthusiasts alike.

So far, the store is split up into three categories: Recreational, Photography, and Accessories. Recreational covers less expensive drone hardware, like the $300 iPhone-connected Parrot AR.Drone 2.0, on downward. You'll find more expensive offerings under Photography, like the $1,300 DJI Phantom 2.

The Accessories section is where drone enthusiasts can really geek out, it seems. Rechargeable battery packs, spare parts, servo testers, carrying cases...and the list goes on.

If anything, the Amazon Drone Store should make getting into the drone business that much easier. Users reviews on Amazon, while sometimes funny, can hopefully guide some purchases, and Amazon's usually-solid return policy/policies will treat buying mistakes gently.

If you're a drone enthusiast yourself, let us know what your thoughts on the storefront in the comments.

Source: Amazon Drone Store

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I wonder who will shoot down more of these things: people taking potshots at them for fun or the growing number of anti-government people.

OT: Well, this should be interesting, what do people do with these things besides just have them fly around?

dalek sec:
I wonder who will shoot down more of these things: people taking potshots at them for fun or the growing number of anti-government people.

OT: Well, this should be interesting, what do people do with these things besides just have them fly around?

To your first question: EVERYONE!

To your second question: ANYTHING! Pranks, random ice bucket challenge, voyeurism, inefficient theft, air joust, dog fights, air racing, victory garden crop dusting, chasing kids off the lawn, etc..............I gotta get one now.

dalek sec:
I wonder who will shoot down more of these things: people taking potshots at them for fun or the growing number of anti-government people.

They'd better have smartlink augmentations to hit something so small and moving so quickly.

This isn't all good. The hobby is expanding too fast, and unsafely so. The types of people who used to buy drones used to be enthusiasts which meant that they did the research, acted more responsibly, and were able to enjoy their hobby safely. In these times, when anyone can get their hands on them, there has been an increase in unsafe practices and privacy concerns which have lead to the FAA considering taking steps to ban certain types of drone use.

Although convenience is generally a good thing, it can also be a curse. The sudden influx of new hobbyist might ruin things for everyone else if they don't learn to use their drones responsibly. If you decide to take up the hobby, don't do stupid things like fly around airports because you think planes taking off look cool. Don't just record people in public because you think you have some right to record whoever you want in a public space.

Although these things seem obvious, they happen. Drones look scary to legislators and the ever growing population of drone fliers is going to make it very easy to justify limitations and bans.

unambiguouslygabe:
This isn't all good. The hobby is expanding too fast, and unsafely so. The types of people who used to buy drones used to be enthusiasts which meant that they did the research, acted more responsibly, and were able to enjoy their hobby safely. In these times, when anyone can get their hands on them, there has been an increase in unsafe practices and privacy concerns which have lead to the FAA considering taking steps to ban certain types of drone use.

Although convenience is generally a good thing, it can also be a curse. The sudden influx of new hobbyist might ruin things for everyone else if they don't learn to use their drones responsibly. If you decide to take up the hobby, don't do stupid things like fly around airports because you think planes taking off look cool. Don't just record people in public because you think you have some right to record whoever you want in a public space.

Although these things seem obvious, they happen. Drones look scary to legislators and the ever growing population of drone fliers is going to make it very easy to justify limitations and bans.

A quick check of Australian laws and it seems that the laws are being worked on an international level, while Australia was one of the first countries to set laws to allow drone use (which is probably why Google tested their drones here) it seems like there's a group trying to set a universal set of laws for Australia, EU, USA etc to follow.
Source:
http://rpastraining.com.au/casr-101-uav-drone-legal-or-illegal/

I'm going to buy a drone for the sole purpose of hunting down government drones.

Hmmm, in a place filled with guns and drones that drop goodies. Is this the 21st century version of Duck Hunt?

What could possibly go wrong :)

 

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