India's Martian Spacecraft Enters Red Planet's Orbit

India's Martian Spacecraft Enters Red Planet's Orbit

Prime Minister Modi adressing from ISRO's Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network (ISTRAC).

Mangalyaan will remain in orbit around Mars, sending back information about Martian weather and methane levels in its atmosphere.

Today, India's Mars Orbiter Mission arrived at its destination and successfully entered the planet's orbit. Prime Minister Narendra Modi was present at the Indian Space Research Organization's command center in Bangalore for the event this morning, and declared it "a shining symbol of what we are capable of as a nation." The space mission was conceived as a chance to prove India could succeed in a highly technical endeavour, and that it could also do so with a relatively small budget.

The total cost of the mission was $74 million- which, compared to NASA's own $671 million trip to Mars (albeit a more complex operation), is much cheaper. The Indian Space Research Organization has always had a small budget, and worked for years in international isolation after the country's nuclear tests wrought many sanctions regarding technological sharing programs. Since 1975, the organization has launched more than 50 satellites, including five foreign satellites in one June launch. Its low-budget affair has entered the spotlight as other countries have begun to rethink the cost of their respective space programs.

India's decision to launch its Mangalyaan spacecraft was the result of China's own failed mission to Mars back in 2012. In just a few months, they planned a mission to insert a 33-pound payload of sensory instruments into Mars' orbit. The operation was centered around a small rocket, a modest 3,000-pound spacecraft, and a plan to slingshot around the Earth in order to achieve the speed needed to reach its destination. Since its launch last November, the mission has encountered no complications.

To celebrate the historic occasion, children across India were asked to come to school by 6:45 a.m. Wednesday (well before the usual starting time) to watch the event on state television. "The odds were stacked against us," Prime Minister Modi said in a televised news conference. "When you are trying to do something that has not been attempted before, it is a leap into the unknown. And space is indeed the biggest unknown out there."

Source: New York Times

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Neat. Good for them, really good for them. I do wish for much more international cooperation in space though, but thats asking a bit much methinks.

WAAAAAAHOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

Congrats to India! That is quite a feat, demonstrating that they are a real player in the development of deep space. I will admit to being thoroughly shocked, as I had heard nothing of developments in this direction --- if there were any articles, it was only one or two.

I hope this serves as impetus for other spacefaring nations (mine included) to step up their game.

Blackwell Stith:

The total cost of the mission was $74 million- which, compared to NASA's own $671 million trip to Mars (albeit a more complex operation)

You might want to use the Odyssey mission not Curiosity for this comparison, Odyssey still cost more but it's a much better comparison for this, as they are both orbiting data collecting satellites.

direkiller:

Blackwell Stith:

The total cost of the mission was $74 million- which, compared to NASA's own $671 million trip to Mars (albeit a more complex operation)

You might want to use the Odyssey mission not Curiosity for this comparison, Odyssey still cost more but it's a much better comparison for this, as they are both orbiting data collecting satellites.

Im not sure what they are referring to that cost $671 million because a 2 second Google shows that Odyssey which was a orbit mission aswell cost $297 million and the Curiosity mission which was the rover one cost $2.5 billion

Congrats to India. You've definitely made an impression in space. Now...how much you wanna bet on who plants the flag?

I wonder if they will be getting a robot on there anytime soon. The optimal window closes soon, so maybe next cycle?

NickBrahz:

direkiller:

Blackwell Stith:

The total cost of the mission was $74 million- which, compared to NASA's own $671 million trip to Mars (albeit a more complex operation)

You might want to use the Odyssey mission not Curiosity for this comparison, Odyssey still cost more but it's a much better comparison for this, as they are both orbiting data collecting satellites.

Im not sure what they are referring to that cost $671 million because a 2 second Google shows that Odyssey which was a orbit mission aswell cost $297 million and the Curiosity mission which was the rover one cost $2.5 billion

http://www.escapistmagazine.com/forums/read/7.861505-Indias-Martian-Spacecraft-Enters-Red-Planets-Orbit#comment_form

From the looks of it , they adjusted it via the bigmac index rather then a direct conversion to USD

Good to see other nations exploring space, tired of it looking like a 1 horse race.

Don't know if budget costs should be directly translated. Man-power is "cheaper" in India because you can have a higher standard of living for the same USD salary.

So glad to know that it was a successful mission. Competition gets nations so motivated! Now if only we could find a way to motivate cooperation...

 

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