Aussie Developer is Kickstarting New Arena FPS Reflex

Aussie Developer is Kickstarting New Arena FPS Reflex

Turbo Pixel's Reflex has AUD $38,000 of its $360,000 goal.

I am man who enjoys simple things. I like my cars fast, my banks closed, and my FPS games arena-style. Quake Live, (even if it's coming to Steam about three years too late), Project Blue Streak, Unreal Tournament? All about them.

And I'm not the only one, it seems. Melbourne, Australia-based Turbo Pixel is working on an Arena FPS of their own. Reflex is a few days into its Kickstarter campaign, and Turbo Pixel has garnered over AUD $38,000 of its $360,000 funding target.

The premise is simple, so far: to build an arena shooter that looks as good as it plays. The movement system is a callback to the arena shooters of old, and should be rewarding to those who put in the time and effort. The fluid movement is "minute to learn, lifetime to master" territory, as any Quake fan will see.

Reflex is also built on its own engine -- no UE4, Unity, or CryEngine -- which should be good news for the twitch shooter crowd. The last engine that handled the genre so well was UE2/2.5, which is now over a decade old. Turbo Pixel's framerate target is 120 (but there won't be a cap), and sampling will hit 1,000. LAN support, and dedicated servers are also in play. Modes in Reflex are standard fare (1v1, Team Deathmatch, Capture The Flag, etc.). as is the weaponry -- the rocket launcher dominates most of the Kickstarter video.

Reflex strikes me as a third-party Quake replacement (in a good way), since there hasn't been a new title in the franchise in six years. (Or if we're discounting Quake Live? Nine years.) And it's about time, since the genre has been bone-dry for roughly a decade now.

The target release date is December 2016, and the minimum needed for a copy of Reflex to call your own is AUD $20 (about USD $17.50). If you dig the arena FPS genre? Check out the campaign, and leave your thoughts in the comments.

Source: Kickstarter

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Well it certainly looks functional, in a very strict Quake sort of way.
Look UT it still my top competitive FPS, but at this point you need to come up with something to push things along, we can't just re-re-remake the same game till the end of time and expect people keep playing. You got a new engine devs, time to make it do something new.

I wasn't a fan of Quake 3, feeling that Q2 was just more fun... I guess there was slight changes to the physics that bothered the hell out of me and I never reached the pinnacle of excellence I had with Q2 in Quake 3. UT however was an awesome series that to this day is one of my goto "twitch" fps games, especially the Assault modes.
I'm going to wait and see on this, I'd like to see a new era of that type of FPS. I miss those days honestly... competitive arena whether it was team 1v1 (one of the best matchup types IMO) TDM, CTF... Ah... glory days.

I still prefer UT over Quake but I can see the quality in this. Not something that I would play but it does look good and at least seems like its easy to follow what is going on, the new Unreal seems to have a lot of bloom for no reason.

looking forward to seeing how this goes, will pledge to help a fellow Aussie :-)

It looks interesting, but I don't really see any reason to play it over Quake or UT.

Movement training tutorials. At least one of the developers must have been a trickjumper in the ET days :p

Dango:
It looks interesting, but I don't really see any reason to play it over Quake...

New players? More intuitive content creation systems? First party support for DeFrag?

...or UT

If you like Quake, and want to play it, UT is not a viable substitute

Smooth Operator:
Well it certainly looks functional, in a very strict Quake sort of way.
Look UT it still my top competitive FPS, but at this point you need to come up with something to push things along, we can't just re-re-remake the same game till the end of time and expect people keep playing. You got a new engine devs, time to make it do something new.

It's a full release of CPMA at its core, which is in itself different from Vanilla Quake 3 or Quake Live
That said, they're also only using CPMA as a foundation, and have already added in several new mechanics/weapons and have stated they will be adding more. Stakejumping and triple jumping seem like they could already pretty drastically change things up depending on how well they're supported on maps

Scootinfroodie:
It's a full release of CPMA at its core, which is in itself different from Vanilla Quake 3 or Quake Live
That said, they're also only using CPMA as a foundation, and have already added in several new mechanics/weapons and have stated they will be adding more. Stakejumping and triple jumping seem like they could already pretty drastically change things up depending on how well they're supported on maps

Yet UT had quad jump a decade ago...
I'm sure the extra jump completely changes the esports meta, but for us mere mortals this minute stuff doesn't change anything. 10 years down the line we really are ready for something a bit more substantial.

Man, I hope this thing gets funded. I want my prototype in December!

Smooth Operator:

Yet UT had quad jump a decade ago...
I'm sure the extra jump completely changes the esports meta, but for us mere mortals this minute stuff doesn't change anything. 10 years down the line we really are ready for something a bit more substantial.

Before you ask for something ore substantial, maybe you should look up what you're actually discussing.
Double jumps in Quake != UT mutators. It's the equivalent of saying "What makes strafe jump so special, I do that in Minecraft all the time, all you do is press spacebar and A or D"
Triple jumps = more instances where you don't necessarily have to rocket jump or plasma climb. Same goes for the stake gun

Here
http://www.trickingq3.com/Tutorials/Strafing_Tutorial.html

Additionally, you say that we need something more substantial when every FPS since Q3 (Fan projects aside) has been toned down. What exactly do you consider "more substantial" to be?

The robot reminds me of Crimson Typhoon. Just for that I'll put some money on it.

Ok... I should point out one very simple and important fact...

THIS IS NOT AN ARENA FPS!

This is a twitch shooter. Big difference. An arena shooter would require, you know... ARENAS. Big, open colosseum areas to fight gobs of enemies in. Serious Sam and Painkiller are two prime examples. Quake and Unreal are both twitch shooters. Actually... let me lay it out like this...

Games like Quake and Shadow Warrior are labyrinthian twitch shooters. They have you transversing mazes (labyrinth) and rely on fast reflexes (twitch). Serious Sam and Painkiller are arena twitch shooters. They have to transversing large, open collosium-like areas filled with gobs of enemies (arena) and rely on fast reflexes (twitch). Then you've got stuff like Half-Life and Unreal Tournoment. These are neither arena nor labyrinthian. But they are twitch-based. That's what this is. It's a twitch shooter, not an arena shooter. There is a difference.

Lugbzurg:
Ok... I should point out one very simple and important fact...

THIS IS NOT AN ARENA FPS!

This is a twitch shooter. Big difference. An arena shooter would require, you know... ARENAS. Big, open colosseum areas to fight gobs of enemies in. Serious Sam and Painkiller are two prime examples. Quake and Unreal are both twitch shooters. Actually... let me lay it out like this...

Games like Quake and Shadow Warrior are labyrinthian twitch shooters. They have you transversing mazes (labyrinth) and rely on fast reflexes (twitch). Serious Sam and Painkiller are arena twitch shooters. They have to transversing large, open collosium-like areas filled with gobs of enemies (arena) and rely on fast reflexes (twitch). Then you've got stuff like Half-Life and Unreal Tournoment. These are neither arena nor labyrinthian. But they are twitch-based. That's what this is. It's a twitch shooter, not an arena shooter. There is a difference.

No, an arena shooter isn't defined by having large sandbox areas. Arena pertains to the style of play, not the map
You're also defining a genre of multiplayer-focused shooters by their single player components (components that don't always exist). If you watch Painkiller MP, it's the same as Quake/UT/etc. in terms of how it's handled

 

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