Researchers Construct First Three-Dimentional Visible Light Invisibility Cloak

Researchers Construct First Three-Dimentional Visible Light Invisibility Cloak

Lasers demonstrate the path of light as it goes through the invisibility cloak.

The cloak is generated by an array of mirrors that obstruct the flow of light and creates an invisible field with almost no distortion.

A group of researchers from the University of Rochester reported to have successfully built the first invisibility cloak that operates in three dimensions. This cloak operates across the full spectral range of visible light, and prevents matter from being viewed from a range of angles. Most importantly, it generates very little distortion that would allow viewers to identify its use.

The technology is comprised of four standard lenses that work across the entire visible light spectrum, as well as a few other frequencies. The two outer lenses focus light from a wide area on two smaller lenses in the middle. The arrangement creates a region where incident light is prevented from reaching the object being cloaked, and reflected light is unable to reach the observer. This affected region of invisibility forms in the shape of a hollow cylinder.

The downside to this array is that an observer must look through the lenses in an angle of 15 degrees off center in order to not-see the visibly concealed area. With that said, it is possible to increase the size of the lenses and generate a much larger invisible area. A practical application of this technology could be found in an invisible field that would allow surgeons to see through their hands during surgery.

Physics professor and director of Rochester's Center for Coherence and Quantum Optics John Howell is the researcher of the study. Last year, Howell and his son created a wearable invisibility cloak that worked using mirrors for $150.

Source: ExtremeTech

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Suuuure a surgeon that can see through their hand. In reality, what this will be used for is to hide a portable, deployable military installation, say a missile turret, for first strike capability.

Remus:
Suuuure a surgeon that can see through their hand. In reality, what this will be used for is to hide a portable, deployable military installation, say a missile turret, for first strike capability.

You say that as if they're not already doing that. Why else would these findings have been made public?

More on topic, neat! I can't really think of anything else to say other than that, but this really is a pretty awesome device.

^ That, or it would be used by special forces units to hide in plain sight and more easily ambush their targets. Or used by snipers to better conceal their locations without foliage. Come to think of it, it reminds me too much of Ghost Recon: Future Soldier.

I think yall missed the part where it said "The downside to this array is that an observer must look through the lenses in an angle of 15 degrees off center in order to not-see the visibly concealed area."

Just throwing that out there.

Agayek:
I think yall missed the part where it said "The downside to this array is that an observer must look through the lenses in an angle of 15 degrees off center in order to not-see the visibly concealed area."

Just throwing that out there.

It's ok. Stick two giant magnifying glasses on both ends of a tank and drive forth. How could anyone notice? It's fool-proof.

Not really common-sense-proof, but whatever. invisibility

Well, I'm gonna start building my Romulan Bird-of-Prey now. I figure by the time I finish, they'll have this ready to put onboard.

It's a fascinating proof of concept, but man...is it limited in scope.

Would be interesting to see if they can suss out a method of achieving the same results regardless of viewing angle.

Consequently, I immediately thought of gravitational lensing when they showed the mock-up.

Vigormortis:
It's a fascinating proof of concept, but man...is it limited in scope.
.

I SEE WHAT YOU DID THERE.

(I bet it was totally intentional.)

((SSSHHHHH))

I wonder if it could be effectively used to "hide" from satellites...
(sure the sat would see a giant lens, but that's all it would see)

Ferisar:

Agayek:
I think yall missed the part where it said "The downside to this array is that an observer must look through the lenses in an angle of 15 degrees off center in order to not-see the visibly concealed area."

Just throwing that out there.

It's ok. Stick two giant magnifying glasses on both ends of a tank and drive forth. How could anyone notice? It's fool-proof.

Not really common-sense-proof, but whatever. invisibility

well, worst case scenario it would provide extra armor. thick lenses are quite effective at stopping kinetic energy. they have saved snipers eyes from bullets on multiple occasion.

Ferisar:

I SEE WHAT YOU DID THERE.

(I bet it was totally intentional.)

((SSSHHHHH))

Yes, but did you see what they did there?

So, we're one step closer to achieving every horny teenager's dream .....
nice !

The Rogue Wolf:
Well, I'm gonna start building my Romulan Bird-of-Prey now. I figure by the time I finish, they'll have this ready to put onboard.

Romulan? Please, their Plasma torpedoes may be powerful, but they're slow enough to be shot down by enemy ships, and their disruptor and armor technology is vastly inferior to the Klingons. I'll take a K'Tinga Battlecruiser over some inferior Romulan product any day of the week.

 

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