New Smartphone Battery is Fully Charged in Two Minutes or Less

New Smartphone Battery is Fully Charged in Two Minutes or Less

StoreDot Reuters 310x

Every hipster who charges their phone at the bar has a new best friend.

That wondrous, magical smartphone computer box thing sitting on your desk or in your pants pocket? Right now it takes about two hours to go from dead (or dead-ish) to fully charged, give or take.

And that's not good enough for StoreDot.

The Israeli startup, showing off its latest prototypes at CES this week, has a new smartphone battery that takes two minutes -- at the most -- to suck up a full charge.

Two major changes come with StoreDot's battery, starting with the amperage used to charge the unit. Virtually any smartphone or tablet you use today uses a current of 1 or 2 amps. StoreDot's charging solution uses 40 amps. More power is going into the battery, which also uses "specially synthesized organic molecules" to move that current between the anode and cathode at a higher speed than traditional batteries. This "nanodot" nanotech is StoreDot's bread and butter, as variations of the company's research is used in batteries, displays, and data storage solutions.

So what's the catch? For one, the tech can't be shoehorned into existing phones. StoreDot's prototypes are based on heavily modified Samsung Galaxy S5 smartphones, but consumer products would have to adapt the company's tech from the ground-up. Second, the batteries are physically larger; while slim smartphone batteries are in excess of 2,000mAh today, StoreDot's current hardware is only 900mAh, good enough for around five hours of life. Based on current designs, a StoreDot 2,000mAh-plus battery would add several millimeters of thickness onto a device. But as is the case with any hardware, weight and size will be shed over time.

For now, StoreDot is targeting 2017 as the year of the smartphone nanodot. If all goes according to plan, the company will have smartphone batteries as slim as those available today, while still offering a full-charge time of two to four minutes.

Source: Android Authority
Image Credit: Reuters

Permalink

Big problem here is adoption. Quick charge times are great, but I'd much rather have a battery that will last the day and charge it overnight than one I need to remember to charge multiple times as I go about my day.

Sure, it'll improve over time, but so will other batteries, and I don't see a preference for high capacity going anywhere unless battery life in general gains a big lead over power consumption.

What I would like to see is some hybrid battery setups. In other words, maybe 80% of my battery capacity is in the old stuff, charging slowly but giving me longer life, while the remaining 20% is in the new stuff and is consumed first, allowing an overall similar battery life, but allowing a 20% charge within a matter of seconds when I need a quick boost.

Jadak:
Big problem here is adoption. Quick charge times are great, but I'd much rather have a battery that will last the day and charge it overnight than one I need to remember to charge multiple times as I go about my day.

Sure, it'll improve over time, but so will other batteries, and I don't see a preference for high capacity going anywhere unless battery life in general gains a big lead over power consumption.

What I would like to see is some hybrid battery setups. In other words, maybe 80% of my battery capacity is in the old stuff, charging slowly but giving me longer life, while the remaining 20% is in the new stuff and is consumed first, allowing an overall similar battery life, but allowing a 20% charge within a matter of seconds when I need a quick boost.

It's worth noting that they expect the battery life to be identical or better by the time they put it into full scale production. The 900mAH version is really just the proof-of-concept. To be honest I think many people would be willing to purchase a phone that requires multiple charges anyway. It's not ideal or necessarily possible for all users, but I know I'm never away from a charging cable more than a couple hours at a time anyway.

this is cool and all but for now i think ill stick to my galaxy s5 that charges in 30 minutes and lasts me 2 days of heavy use

Well the battery in my HTC will last a whole day of browsing and messaging with around 5-6 hours playing music constantly, plus the odd bit of video streaming on a full charge. The only things that kill the battery life are games and constant streaming.

The battery takes about an hour to fully charge (it is less than a year old though) which means I tend to charge it once in the morning and give it a top up in the afternoon, just in case.

I still miss the old days of my Sony Ericsson walkman phone. That thing could hold a charge for over a week.

As for this new stuff; if they can get the capacity and endurance up to current standards by 2017, then hell, I'll bite. But if it remains closer to its current state, then I'll pass because I just don't see the benefit.

No microwave ovens needed, huh? /jk

This tech might be great for things like radios and handheld equipment, where constant use requires charging and battery swapping often anyway. But it might take jumping some hurdles to get it into basic cell phone adoption. Forty amps means the cable and the charger will be pretty big. No USB port is going to deliver that juice, either, and the adoption of micro USB 2.0 or 3.0 on almost *shoots the bird in the general direction of Cupertino, CA* every model smartphone will make it hard for some to choose to go back to solely relying on power bricks.

(The power tool industry might like it, if the tech can scale up inexpensively and safely. Then again, they like highway robbery when it comes to spare batteries. It a coin toss.)

Or just buy two batteries, charge time becomes as fast as you can swap those.
Also a bulky battery that charges extremely fast with little storage capacity already exists, we know them as capacitors.

I'd rather have slow charging batteries that last long.

We really don't need this in the world right now. It's not harmful but I can't think of a single instance when all the money and time spent on this would be justified

blink:
We really don't need this in the world right now. It's not harmful but I can't think of a single instance when all the money and time spent on this would be justified

It's battery tech catching up to what already is, personally I'd like to see a Plutonium™ battery that last a lifetime so I won't need cables anymore before a smartphone on my manhood that's high hipster fashion.

blink:
We really don't need this in the world right now. It's not harmful but I can't think of a single instance when all the money and time spent on this would be justified

The same can be said for most of the tech you own, bud.

So if im reading this right, all they did was made a stronger current charger without changing the batteries themselves? oh boy is this going to backfire once their batteries start dieing. you can overcharge your smartphone batteries too. and if you do it smartly you too can make it charge in minutes. expect to need replacement in a month though because it kills the battery. and from what i see here this is not much more than that.

MazokuRanma:
To be honest I think many people would be willing to purchase a phone that requires multiple charges anyway. It's not ideal or necessarily possible for all users, but I know I'm never away from a charging cable more than a couple hours at a time anyway.

im horrified of what you said. its bad enough i see people charging phones daily. what the hell? I charge my phone once a week and it never dies on me. i would never buy a phone with battery so small i need to charge it daily. heck, id pay good money if they could double my battery capacity even if that means doubling the size of phone. alas - no such models exist.

Smooth Operator:
Or just buy two batteries, charge time becomes as fast as you can swap those.
Also a bulky battery that charges extremely fast with little storage capacity already exists, we know them as capacitors.

not going to work unless you can swap them faster than your phone realizes you pulled the battery out. otherwise you need to shut it down.

Strazdas:
So if im reading this right, all they did was made a stronger current charger without changing the batteries themselves? oh boy is this going to backfire once their batteries start dieing.

You're very obviously not reading it right:

Devin Connors:
uses "specially synthesized organic molecules" to move that current between the anode and cathode at a higher speed than traditional batteries.

Kahani:

Strazdas:
So if im reading this right, all they did was made a stronger current charger without changing the batteries themselves? oh boy is this going to backfire once their batteries start dieing.

You're very obviously not reading it right:

Devin Connors:
uses "specially synthesized organic molecules" to move that current between the anode and cathode at a higher speed than traditional batteries.

im sorry but using buzzwords is not equivalent to scientific discovery.

ALso it does not matter what organic molecules they are using, if the batteries are still based, as most of phone batteries are, on Lithium-ion.

While this is great, what I really care about is longevity of the battery. I have no problem charging my phone overnight and while this sure would be convenient it's not much more to me than a novelty without battery life to back it up.

40 amps? That's insane. That has got to be a mistake. That is way more than the most power hungry electrical household appliance. Things that typically fall into the 30 amp range are: electric dryers, electric stoves, and electric ovens. I don't even think central AC units use 40 amps.

If its not a mistake, this has got to be the most power inefficient method of energy transfer in human history. And I'm including the campfire in that estimation.

blink:
We really don't need this in the world right now. It's not harmful but I can't think of a single instance when all the money and time spent on this would be justified

That is CES for you...

 

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