The FCC Just Changed the Definition of Broadband Internet

 Pages PREV 1 2
 

Baldr:
I believe 4K streaming is excessive at this point. Netflix, I'm not one of your customers, but if your going to clog up the internet with your excessive bandwidth, you pay for infrastructure.

Please understand the basics of how things work before saying something like this. They and we are already paying plenty. And then there are plenty of times where the infrastructure was supposed to be built out, given money from tax breaks, which never happened. This is ISPs trying to quintuple-dip on money to do work they would have done if there was an ounce of competition, to get us up to even remotely close to the rest of the first world on internet speeds.

From what I can tell from the posts here, this means that they'll be unable to classify their sub-25 connections as broadband, and thus not receive subsidies. Now, what's more likely, they'll spend money to upgrade the infrastructure, and thus reclaim those subsidies, or they'll just stop calling it broadband and pass the added expense on to the consumer, who will HAVE to pay due to lack of competition? As part of the 19.4%, I'm quite certain that we're more likely to get screwed than saved by this.

Elijin:
*snip*

What the fuck, did you two make some secret deal with satan involving your first born children?
Seriously, http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/4102482936
I am a sad.

I'm in the US, and am completely and totally jealous of your "inferior" Australian broadband.
http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/4103035474
This is the fastest plan available in my location. Period.

Zemaddog:

Bernzz:

Meanwhile, in Australia...
http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/4101657455

Yeah. I'm impossibly envious of you.

I love having Australian internet!
http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/4101677355

I do not know what you guys are complaining about.

To make matters worse, I cannot improve it without paying double as internet is covered by the rent. And improving the included one means convincing every pensioner in the building that it is worth spending a few dollars more every month on these new-fangled internets. Even in a country with actual competition between ISPs, old men in suits hold our internet connections in their iron fists.

Hey America, welcome to the world of crappy Internet, we have t-shirts so we'll need your size. We are having our monthly mixer in a few days, new guy brings the pizza.

I wish our (Australia's Internet) is as bad as Americas is right now.

For the Americans throwing out bad results, the key details are the %. You'll notice the 80 and 90mb connections show up as faster than 98% of the country.

Whereas your slow results, show as slower then 70-80% of the readings taken.

Compound that with the fact that almost everything has to go to the US anyway because of server structuring, and Australia is a shitty place to internet.

Elijin:
For the Americans throwing out bad results, the key details are the %. You'll notice the 80 and 90mb connections show up as faster than 98% of the country.

Whereas your slow results, show as slower then 70-80% of the readings taken.

Compound that with the fact that almost everything has to go to the US anyway because of server structuring, and Australia is a shitty place to internet.

The problem in the US isn't the speed of internet, it's the price of internet. We pay more per megabit than most other developed countries.

Also, I don't trust this change. It all sounds too good. I don't trust Wheeler. Guy is a former Telecom lobbyist. You know he's in the back pockets of the big telecoms. I don't know what his angle is, but I feel like there's something up his sleeve and none of us will like it. Time will tell.

BiH-Kira:

AstaresPanda:
Iver never understood why america has some really piss poor internet speeds, i mean ffs im not even paying to the top level speeds with my isp and running a speed test now gave me 87 download and 11 upload.
http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/4100651637

The US is the first country that had accessible internet to the average Joe. The infrastructure is long forgotten ancient technology and changing it costs a lot. The sheer size of the US makes this even worse because the population density is far lower than in most European countries (generally speaking, cities are freaking dense, denser than the average youtube comment) meaning that you need more infrastructure for the same amount of people than other countries.
If you look at the the whole western world, you will notice hat most of them have worse internet than now developing 2nd world countries which are installing better infrastructure right from the start. It's a huge starting investment and ya know the old saying "don't fix what ain't broken"

I've not done much research, so feel free to correct me if I'm wrong, but it appears that a lot of America has high speed internet infrastructure, it's just being kept from you.

BiH-Kira:

If you look at the the whole western world, you will notice hat most of them have worse internet than now developing 2nd world countries

The 2nd world was the Communist block and it collapsed back in '89, there is no such thing any more.

Here in the UK, literally yesterday, i gained the ability to go from standard broadband to "high speed broadband", i've gone from 5mb to nearly 17mb. Obviously i'm absolutely stoked about it, i've never experienced anything this fast, but i'm also aware i'm still slower than most of the world still.
Hopefully this doesn't signal the end of the upgrades, now that the government has fulfilled their "obligation" to providing "hi speed" broadband to the nation, a nation roughly 40 times smaller than the US.

I would kill for some decent internet. I live out in the boonies, and good ISPs are nowhere near me. So right now I'm stuck with about a 500kb/s MAXIMUM download speed. MAXIMUM. Bring me the head of TalkTalk's CEO.

lol.... Australia...
My Broadband here gets me 2 mbps up 500 kbps down... with a ping of 15ms.

To be fair that's a lot faster than most places here....

I'm getting optus cable internet, as I've moved out of home, and it's at 95-100mbps, at home I got 12 mbps on a good day.

Go Australian internet!

Atmos Duality:

Hoplon:
It really doesn't remove phone based dsl from the equation at all, BT in the UK is rolling out (as in it's still on going, at about 80% of homes right now) fiber to the cabinets, this get people up to 76 mbps down the phone line. perhaps they will just have to not over charge for shit services from now on.

No, they'll just overcharge for the new standard, quietly throttle down speeds when the introductory grace period runs out, scale up regular carrier-costs and blame the government when people complain.

I've worked in this business before; I know how these jackals think.

Would that company happen to be Comcast? When we cancelled our HBO subscription, they assumed for some inexplicable reason we also wanted out internet speed halved. It took sending my extremely intimidating loud mouthed uncle to go down & raise hell in person to get it back up.

First: You have to wonder how this will negatively effect people because we all know the FCC is against net neutrality, so it would have to work into that paradigm somehow. I can only imagine that they can justify fast lanes if the entire infrastructure is faster somehow. So, if everyone is getting at least 25 then the fast lanes will get 50+ to push so maybe you actually hit that 25 on good day maybe? I don't know.

Second: Redefining what constitutes broadband is a useless thing. It's not going to magically install new infrastructure that makes everything faster, and they aren't going to magically reduce rates of their services because they are no longer selling you broadband. Someone else pointed it out and I can't for the life me find the comment to quote, but all it does is make more of the country not fall into what is considered broadband by the new standards. If the poverty line is set to $25K and below, all it does is put more people there, it doesn't actually improve anyone's situation that falls into that new range.

Anyhoo, wish us luck, rest of the world. Stuff like this brings out my rarely seen pessimistic side. It feels more like a way the FCC is going to still try to screw us but at the same time convince us we aren't being screwed.

Edit: Higher speeds mean very little to a lot of users, it's just a way for the sites to send you bigger and bigger ads rather than anything that would constitute a life changing shift for most users.

Entitled:

BiH-Kira:

If you look at the the whole western world, you will notice hat most of them have worse internet than now developing 2nd world countries

The 2nd world was the Communist block and it collapsed back in '89, there is no such thing any more.

I don't think that is true anymore. Second world, in modern vernacular, means any nations that is between poverty and prosperity. I like to think of them as the parts of the world no one gives a second thought to (the middle child). What you are talking about is the definition circa cold war era. At the time, first, second and third world definitions were about political ideologies, where now they act as a go to for economic status.

likalaruku:
Would that company happen to be Comcast?

Briefly. It'd be more accurate to say I've worked for them twice, both times as a freelance temp.

When we cancelled our HBO subscription, they assumed for some inexplicable reason we also wanted out internet speed halved. It took sending my extremely intimidating loud mouthed uncle to go down & raise hell in person to get it back up.

Here's a little secret: If you know the regional manager's office number, it becomes much easier to sort those kinds of issues out. As I found out, corporate really, really hates complaints actually penetrating beyond the Customer Disservice and Marketing firewalls.

Well, as long as you weren't on any of their shitlists. Lets just say that I know a few people that Comcast would actually call periodically, threatening to throttle them down, if they didn't stop eating up the local grid's total bandwidth.
(excessive torrenting, basically and this was before the RIAA publicly announced their evil alliance with the cable cartels to enforce the law of Mickey Mouse)

After a while, I think they just stopped bothering with the phone calls and throttled everyone on the block down to 2.4Mbps; cheaper and easier that way. Just one more reason I didn't bother spending the extra 50 bucks a month.

*looks at 175mbps down internet*

Oh, ok.

schmulki:

Baldr:
I believe 4K streaming is excessive at this point. Netflix, I'm not one of your customers, but if your going to clog up the internet with your excessive bandwidth, you pay for infrastructure.

Please understand the basics of how things work before saying something like this. They and we are already paying plenty. And then there are plenty of times where the infrastructure was supposed to be built out, given money from tax breaks, which never happened. This is ISPs trying to quintuple-dip on money to do work they would have done if there was an ounce of competition, to get us up to even remotely close to the rest of the first world on internet speeds.

I'm a former cable company employee, I understand it all to well. Maybe you should try to do more research on the subject, right now Netflix makes up about 35% of internet traffic in North America, it one of the main primary sources of congestion on the backbone.

Baldr:
I'm a former cable company employee, I understand it all to well. Maybe you should try to do more research on the subject, right now Netflix makes up about 35% of internet traffic in North America, it one of the main primary sources of congestion on the backbone.

Yes, I know this as well. Is it data Netflix has paid to go out and consumers have paid for to have coming in? Yes. Therefore, not a crap is given about the "poor ISP" who has to deliver on what they've sold both sides already.

We as a country have literally paid multiple times for this: we pay to have data go out, we pay to have data come in, and we've all paid at least once via tax incentives for infrastructure to be built out, which has not happened. It's not our fault or Netflix's fault that ISPs are selling a service they cannot deliver on and whine/throw money at legislature about every time they're asked to deliver what they've sold.

 Pages PREV 1 2

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here