Hasbro: We've Released "Plenty" of Female Star Wars: Rebels Toys - Update

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Hasbro: We've Released "Plenty" of Female Star Wars: Rebels Toys - Update

Responding to accusations that it hasn't released enough female Star Wars: Rebels toys, Hasbro has said that it's put out "plenty."

Update: Hasbro, responding to criticisms about its response to the concerns about its Star Wars: Rebels toy line, has offered a new revised statement answer to the interviewer's original question.

"Hasbro actually has some great new characters from Rebels hitting shelves now such as Sabine and Hera," said the company. "[It's also] recently been releasing more females within our Black Series and Saga Legends line such as Mara Jade, Toryn Farr, Bastila Shan, Luminara Unduli, Padma [sic] Amidala (Geonosis), and a number of great Leia's such as [Episode IV], Endor, and the awesome Boushh disguise that was revealed at NYCC."

While this statement does a much better job of highlighting the company's overall progress toward more diversified Star Wars action figures, it must be noted that it doesn't really address the issue of whether or not it will be releasing more female Rebels toys to help counterbalance the overwhelming focus on male characters like Ezra and Kanaan.

Original Story: If there's one thing that Star Wars is good for, it's merchandising. Since its earliest days, the franchise has been nothing if not a factory for churning out Star Wars-stamped toys, t-shirts, lunch boxes and more. Recent years, however, have demonstrated that there are apparent limits to the sorts of merchandise companies will produce. If you're a female Star Wars character, for instance, you might find that toy makers are less interested in selling you as an action figure.

That, at least, is the takeaway we got from recent a recent statement from Hasbro indicating that its Star Wars: Rebels toy line includes "plenty" of female representation. The comment came following a question from one attendee inquiring as to whether or not the company had any plans to expand its Rebels offerings to include more Hera and Sabine action figures. "Where are the action figures for the female characters from Rebels, like Hera, Sabine, or Maketh Tua," asked the questioner. "Male characters like Ezra and Kanan have been released multiple times already in many formats and scales, yet the best we've seen on shelves so far is a single Sabine with a non-removable helmet and a yet-to-be-released Hera, both of whom are packed with re-released Stormtroopers." Hasbro's response was to simply say that the company "feels [it has] released plenty of female characters in the line."

While not specifically saying it won't invest in more female action figures in the future, that definitely sounds like a dismissal from where we're sitting. This is unfortunate for a variety of reasons, the least of which not being that it's not the first time we've seen this kind of thing happen with Star Wars toys. Just last year, Disney fell under scrutiny after customers realized that the company's online store included no Princess Leia action figures. Facing mounting pressure from fans, the company eventually agreed to add Leia toys to its online catalog.

What strikes me personally is just how short-sighted this and most gender-based toy exclusions feel. Setting aside the fact that I'd happily buy female targeted Star Wars toys for my daughter, I can say that I would have been perfectly happy to receive a female action figure when I was a kid so long as it hailed from a property that I already enjoyed. Back when I was playing with Ninja Turtles, for instance, I wanted an April O'Neil to play with simply because she was a part of the show. Granted, that's just me, but I sometimes wonder if toy companies overestimate how much young boys scoff at the idea of playing with a non-boy toy. At least in the current case there are already some female toys available. Even so, here's hoping Hasbro decides to expand past "plenty" at some point in the future.

Source: Jedi Temple Archives

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If female character figures sell less than male character figures, then surely this would be expected? The market responds to demand. If people aren't buying female figures at the rate of male figures, then of course there will be a shorter supply of female figures. What is Hasbro supposed to do about it? If Hasbro could create demand out of thin air, they'd be the most successful company in the world.

Is selling fewer female character figures a measure of popularity or a reflection of availability?

I mean, if you have 9 male figures and 1 female figure, that could skew things regardless of popularity, especially considering corporate inertia.

ZiggyE:
If female character figures sell less than male character figures, then surely this would be expected? The market responds to demand. If people aren't buying female figures at the rate of male figures, then of course there will be a shorter supply of female figures. What is Hasbro supposed to do about it? If Hasbro could create demand out of thin air, they'd be the most successful company in the world.

I think the problem though is that there are no, or at least very very very rare, female action figures for Rebels. It's not like they put a bunch out and no one bought them. They haven't put them out because they think no one will buy them. Which is insane, considering this is the same copy that owns MLP. They should know better, or at least be willing to take a bit of a risk and see.
The place I work at has tones of Rebels stuff, but it's all the male characters. Ezra's lightsaber, The Inquisitor's lightsaber, his mask. those creepy-looking two-foot tall dolls of Kanan, Ezra, Stormtroopers, and pilots. But I have yet to see a single toy of Sabine or Hera, which considering how strong they are portrayed in the show, is kind of weird.

altnameJag:
Is selling fewer female character figures a measure of popularity or a reflection of availability?

I mean, if you have 9 male figures and 1 female figure, that could skew things regardless of popularity, especially considering corporate inertia.

Demand can still be measured in that way. For example if the female figures that do exist are regularly selling out, then Hasbro would restock. Guessing that they aren't restocking would suggest sales were indeed lackluster, which would make them less likely to want to create more female toys in the first place.

Sniper Team 4:
They haven't put them out because they think no one will buy them. Which is insane, considering this is the same copy that owns MLP. They should know better, or at least be willing to take a bit of a risk and see.

I wonder if we'll be seeing an article on the Escapist complaining about the lack of male representation relative to male consumers in Hasbro's MLP figures. Somehow I doubt it.

I fail to understand on how this article trying to say it's a problem. Are we in some kind of bizarre USSR state demanding that there must be full female representation in everything?

I'm a male pushing 30, and I'd gladly buy a toy of Hera. She's my favorite character in Star Wars: Rebels. She's kind, insightful, dependable, and one hell of a pilot. Come on, Hasbro. I would have thought you'd have learned your lesson by now after the brony phenomenon.

Poor Hera, always being overshadowed by the rest of the crew. She's the Applejack of the show.

Speaking of which:

ZiggyE:

I wonder if we'll be seeing an article on the Escapist complaining about the lack of male representation relative to male consumers in Hasbro's MLP figures. Somehow I doubt it.

Interestingly enough, there have been such discussions elsewhere:
https://www.yahoo.com/movies/a-my-little-pony-movie-plea-dont-forget-the-boys-100695282202.html

Speaking as someone who works in retail, the "Pink Aisle/Blue Aisle" mentality is still very much alive and well.

EDIT: I just re-read your post and realized you were referring to creating toys of male MLP characters in particular rather than marketing in general. Oops.

That would be tough to do, as there really aren't any major male protagonists aside from Spike. In the case of Rebels however, Hera is a prominent character and an integral member of the Ghost's crew. I would hope people would clamor for representation if an MLP equivalent existed but had no merchandise.

I wanna just start off saying that I'm a hunter/collector of sorts. Rare, but not ungodly expensive toys be they nostalgic, or just not very available, or a part of my fandom (which usually means they're rare), etc.
Disposable income is a hell of a drug. <.< Anyhow...

I -really- wanna get a Hera, and Sabine figure, or at least know they exist. Especially good ones. Removable helmet, good accessories, half decent articulation, what have you. I've barely seen star wars rebels figures, period, aside from giant ones, masks, and that spinny saber the sith has. That just makes the hunt harder, and more rewarding, IMO.

In non Rebels lines, I have seen Slave Leia, and Mara Jade. Like, once per figure. If I could've afforded it at hte time, I would've gotten them. Still stupidly rare.

Thing is, female figures tend to get short packed. Meaning they get shipped out at a very low rate for what ever reason.
I mean when I was hunting down an April O'Niel figure, I learned that she came once in every -50- figures or so, and that was a while ago. New figures means she's even more rare. That puts her pretty behind, well, lots of characters. I doubt it's uncommon that female figures are stupid rare because they don't get shipped frequently. I see more Mousers than April, for crying out loud. It'd be a small miracle to see Karai, I imagine.

Short packing has nothing to do with the size of the cast, unfortunately. I mean April is a main character as much as any of the turtles, and she's about 1 in every 50 figures (Again, if that with new waves coming out since then!), and we don't see that many on shelves. That means she's obscenely rare, and that means even if she does sell, she simply cannot generate the numbers that equal demand in people's book.
As a toy hunter, I can safely say that short packs probably get bought up in a hurry for collectors, and re-sellers. Even with that, I don't exactly see a new April O'niel figure coming out even if it's just to update her arsenal with a iron fan, and maybe some psychic energy thing?
Yeah, we got the new bay movie one, but that's not the same thing, and even then she's kinda rare, not that that line has many figures in general, so she's less rare, but just barely.

I mean, ever wonder why it's so easy to find Star Lord, Leonardo, Captain America, Optimus Prime, Grimlock, etc. but almost impossible to find a Gamora, Black Widow, Arcee (Not that she was in the newest movie anyhow.), or April O'niel?

I can see that those are the ones boys wanna buy because they relate better to male heroic figures (Even though Rocket raccoon, and Groot who aren't human have really taken off), and will have one of the deadliest, most proficient fighters in the galaxy job coz she's a woman, but we just don't get the opportunity to prove ourselves interested in characters that aren't male.

TLDR: People keep talking about this "demand" thing, but if money talks, there's vastly little to spend the money on, so we can't "talk." The potential is gone before the figures are even shipped out.

I am a geeky father or two girls and it is virtually impossible to find good female geek stuff from them. Particularly in kid sizes. Believe me, there is demand and I have put tons of effort into finding stuff. At one point, I even had a comic book artist more or less suggest that I make illegal copies of his work onto a T-shirt as no one would make any.

My daughters love Disney Infinity; they have all the female characters and maybe1/4 of the male. For the Disney stuff, that means they have nine femalefigures. For Marvel, they have two. Which is particularly odd as in game, they have models for Wasp and Carol Danvers, but didn't actually make the figures. Additionally, when I go to local stores, they are always sold out of female characters.

Granted, I don't have their sales numbers, but I doubt I'm the only geeky dad in their 30s with daughters and disposable income.

I think it is the same argument games companies use for male player characters. They assume a main demo of males and then they assume a male will only want to play as a male. Which simply isn't true. I for one will always pick the female option if that's available to me. (though then if romance is possible I just don't do it cuz that gets way to weird for me :p)

Part of me wants to be sympathetic, but I'm uncomfortably gonna side with the " Omg please go take your feminist whining somewhere else!". I say this despite being a feminist because as far as I know there's never been an equality issue in Hasbros toyline. I own a goddamn Mon Mothma action figure and she's not even a cool character. I highly suspect the people complaining could not actually give a shit about the characters its just controversy to click bait with.

I'm sure Hasbo will release the rest of the characters they always do. Chill the fuck out. This is why people don't respect affirmative action movements. Its hard to take Al Sharpton seriously when he shows up with lawyers every time a black guy gets a speeding ticket.

OT: My favorite character is Hera. Its nice to see a Twi'lek take center stage. I know theres a Twi'lek jedi Master but hes never been a main cast character.

Its probably more to do with the parents. You might as a kid love playing portal 2 but its your parents in there sometimes limited scope that got you the lego movie videogame instead. In that same way many parents look at there boy and buy them exclusively boy stuff.

ZiggyE:
If female character figures sell less than male character figures, then surely this would be expected? The market responds to demand. If people aren't buying female figures at the rate of male figures, then of course there will be a shorter supply of female figures. What is Hasbro supposed to do about it? If Hasbro could create demand out of thin air, they'd be the most successful company in the world.

this logic does not make sense... it has been seen, and sited numerous times that female dolls/figures sell-out equally if not more often them male dolls/figures, so this is a direct indicator of demand. but then we arrive at these dolls/figures being released in lower quantities, so this indicates very low supply. even from a Business 101 standpoint when ever demand for the product is higher then your supply of the product you are losing money because you are not keeping up with demand (in most cases it is said that you competitors will get business instead, or your prices are too low, but here) this means that if they would simply make more of the products, or in the case of the article "just make the products to begin with" then they would be able to justify creating more of the product because they would see that the products sell.

you know what Barbie sells well every year Barbie has good sales numbers (no mater how many times they just put here in a different dress), so this shows that there is a demand for Barbie (I am saying that Barbie is a quality role-model, or even a quality character, or product), but they also have Ken, and the Ken dolls also sell well. sometimes when shopping for a niece who is really into Barbie I think that I could just get her a Ken doll, and its like "related to barbie" but usually there is a very low quantity of Ken dolls on store shelves (when I have looked I am lucky to find 1, or 2 on shelves, and he is always wearing the same "I am either a D-bag, or doormat" scarf, and Cardigan), but if stores do not have them in stock then that means that they must sell well, and if they sell well, or are sold out often then they should make more to offset demand, but they don't because they don't percieve Ken as being as popular, and therefore do not create them.

the sentiment that a company cannot create demand out of thin air is a feasible, and realistic statement if they created a space where they could test to see if there was a demand in the first place instead of just turning to one another in a board room, and say "this show is designed for boys cause it has explosions, so should we create toys for the girls".... "no, girls would want any toys for this, so we don't have to create toys based on these good quality female characters"

gardian06:
it has been seen, and sited numerous times that female dolls/figures sell-out equally if not more often them male dolls/figures

I've seen no such source for Hasbro's Star Wars line.

Yeah, this really annoys me. I haven't gone looking for Star Wars: Rebels toys of any description, but back when Wreck-it Ralph came out I really wanted to buy a Sergeant Calhoun action figure. There wasn't one. There was a $100 limited edition doll that looked nothing like the character, and there was a non-articulated statue in one of the multi-packs, but no action figures.

Most media/entertainment companies like to target specific audiences and when that requires selling action figures that means targeting under 12 year old boys.

Young Justice was made for under 12 year old boys but it skewed in audience to girls and older audiences which resulted in it losing money as the figures did not sell.

The problem is that just because some parents may by a Star Wars action figure for there daughters most don't just like parents don't buy girl figures for boys.

When I was very young nearly all my toys were birthday/Christmas gifts and were a surprise. If I asked for a specific transformer I got a transformer and I'm sure that's true for most children today.

So toy companies do focus on specific audiences for each product line because they have to.

Only in America would institutionalised sexism get repeatedly "justified" by referencing capitalism and "freedom"...

Maze1125:
Only in America would institutionalised sexism get repeatedly "justified" by referencing capitalism and "freedom"...

Only on the internet would something as trivial as Star Wars action figure distribution get repeatedly "criticised" by referencing institutionalised sexism.

ZiggyE:

Only on the internet would something as trivial as Star Wars action figure distribution get repeatedly "criticised" by referencing institutionalised sexism.

It's not about a shortage of star wars figures, not really. It's about toy companies not wanting to sell, or sell to girls. Unless it's their target demographic. And with the 'Young justice' controversy still being talked about, which was also a debate about not wanting to market merchandise to girls, it's not odd to see people getting worried when it keeps happening.

keniakittykat:

It's not about a shortage of star wars figures, not really. It's about toy companies not wanting to sell, or sell to girls.

Hasbro does sell to girls. In fact it has many female orientated properties. The issue is girls don't want to buy star wars. That isn't sexism.

ZiggyE:

keniakittykat:

It's not about a shortage of star wars figures, not really. It's about toy companies not wanting to sell, or sell to girls.

Hasbro does sell to girls. In fact it has many female orientated properties. The issue is girls don't want to buy star wars. That isn't sexism.

You're completely missing the point, here. It is not that there aren't any popular licenses for girls, it's that merchandisers don't want to sell originally male-oriented properties to girls because they have an unfounded fear of losing their money.
While not really sexism, it's more of a chicken and egg concept; aren't girls buying the toys because they just aren't interested, or aren't they buying because no one is making them?

Actually I think this is a matter of out of control politics more than anything. The big question people should be asking is "why are these toys out of stock?" the answer is of course "because people buy them". If you've paid attention for example you'll notice that female figures are among the first to sell out in many cases, for example there was a huge run on things like "Ninjini" for Skylanders and the limited edition one seemed to disappear in record time (I was reading some things about this, and another character called "Flashwing" that was some overpowered crystal dragon). When you look at things like oh say "Malifaux" or "Warhammer" figures the female models tend to be the hardest to find since the batches sell out. On something like Ebay you'll find it's far more expensive to say start buying an army of Sisters Of Battle or find other female figures than to say build a space marine force. When Games Workshop does restock some of these figures they seem to wind up depleting the supply fairly quickly. When it comes to statues and such collectors productions featuring female characters oftentimes out sell their male counterparts. I believe DC at one point even wound up running entire "DC Heroines" lines for this reason.

Now the reason for this is obvious, girls like the girl figures, and dudes like stuff with hot girls for decoration in setting up displays and such.

What's more action figures nowadays aren't something kids play with heavily, I mean it happens, but action figures tend to be aimed at a collector's market and fans. This includes people speculating and preparing for resale down the road. This has had some interesting effects on a few toy products right now like Skylanders, Disney Infinity, and Amiibo as you see products kids actually like in this video-game driven day and age entering into the collectors market, which means that a kid or the parent of a kid who simply wants a toy to be played with and is acting like a typical consumer (go to the store, expect a toy to be there) competing with fandom and collectors for the same pieces.

Something like Star Wars that has a *fanatic* fan base is probably seeing it's most recent IP circled by collectors and speculators like hungry sharks, especially with what a lot of old Star Wars toys go for The way this sounds is that as many female figures were produced as were of the male characters, however speculators and fans as opposed to kids bought them all up. The judgement is simply being made based on what can be easily found on the shelves at Wal*Mart. Chances are if you want a current run Princess Leia figure or one of the female "Rebels" characters it's pretty easy to get, but your simply going to have to go to a collector's market and pay three to five times the retail price to people who know they have the market cornered and will be able to sell these figures for what they want given time and patience.

I'd also expect the "multipacking" is because Hasbro knows geekboys will buy the female figures, and packing them with more figures (reprints and such) allows them to charge even more for the figure they know people want.

Now yeah, this does suck from the perspective of average mommy going to buy her kids figures, but this is nothing new, and it's been going on for a while and continues to "shock" for whatever reason. If anything the problem isn't to go after Hasbro but to complain to retailers. I'd be surprised if people on this site of all places haven't run into people camping stores like Wal*Mart and walking away with a bunch of copies of the same figure, or at least heard about it. When it comes to things like this stores don't generally enforce any kinds of limits. At the same time, it needs to be understood that Hasbro itself knows it's producing a collectible product at this point, and it's not going to shoot itself in the foot by overprinting. Like it or not the sales to kids right here and now aren't the bread and butter of their business, unless the whole situation changes, it knows that it's long term relationship is going to be with those collectors and speculators who will continue to purchase and trade the products for decades if treated well.

Trying to put things into the context of older toy lines like "Ninja Turtles" doesn't quite work because while huge that was a sort of "out of the blue" success and wasn't expected to be as long lasting as it turned out to be. Nobody expected nostalgia to actually have people wanting to pay crazy prices for Ninja Turtle figures down the road, thus nobody say ran out to all the toy stores and bought out entire shipments as soon as they came in the door to put them on Ebay or drive them around from Con to Con. In that case you can argue *some* sexism being present since it was arguably a testosterone fest, with that version being marketed at boys almost exclusively too young to think of girls as being anything but "yucky" (though this did not remain the case). However at the same time to the credit of the Turtles they did back down to the feminists making complaints and introduced "Venus Demilo" which hardly seemed to bring the screaming girls in and arguably remains mocked to this day. The point here being that going by this kind of precedent you really can't blame certain kinds of businesses for not catering to PCness when it usually backfires on the bottom line. Screaming gender inequality for example doesn't mean much if you can't guarantee women showing up with piles of money if the demands are met. You want pandering, you pay for it, even if half hearted, enough money comes in and as time goes on it will be taken more seriously.

Also as a side note, it's possible Carrie Fisher herself might have done a bit to tank Princess Leia in recent years. She didn't age well, and it still remains to be seen what a personal trainer (and if rumors are to be believed) extensive plastic surgery can do. Everyone dug her, or crushed on her, back in the metal bikini days, even girls sort of worshipped it as "Bikini Leia" is a sort of cosplay favorite, however time passes for everyone and I think the reality of what she aged into hit a lot of people it kind of hurt the character's popularity, fair or not. It also probably doesn't help that she apparently made some money (she wasn't as successful as other Star Wars Alumni apparently) as a stand up comic, and doing autobiographies talking about Star Wars behind the scenes which weren't especially flattering, I remember some quote about how to do that job, especially the famous bikini bit, she had to come to work really stoned. I wouldn't be surprised if a number of fans have a grudge against her for sort of mocking Star Wars professionally, sort of like a phase Shatner went through, albeit without working consistently like Shatner did, and not turning things around on her own (right now if she recants it's arguably because she's being offered money for a sequel that was never going to be made, Shatner seemed to apologize even when he didn't have any direct Trek projects in the works, he was arguably concerned that being typecast as Captain Kirk meant a lot of his other work wasn't being as appreciated as it should be.. Shatner actually being pretty talented and versatile).

keniakittykat:

ZiggyE:

keniakittykat:

It's not about a shortage of star wars figures, not really. It's about toy companies not wanting to sell, or sell to girls.

Hasbro does sell to girls. In fact it has many female orientated properties. The issue is girls don't want to buy star wars. That isn't sexism.

You're completely missing the point, here. It is not that there aren't any popular licenses for girls, it's that merchandisers don't want to sell originally male-oriented properties to girls because they have an unfounded fear of losing their money.
While not really sexism, it's more of a chicken and egg concept; aren't girls buying the toys because they just aren't interested, or aren't they buying because no one is making them?

... Or (as I pointed out below) are all the toys being bought out so fast that the girls just can't reliably find any in the course of regular shopping. :)

Therumancer:
... Or (as I pointed out below) are all the toys being bought out so fast that the girls just can't reliably find any in the course of regular shopping. :)

Exactly, this guy gets it!

Therumancer:
... Or (as I pointed out below) are all the toys being bought out so fast that the girls just can't reliably find any in the course of regular shopping. :)

Well if that was the case then why wouldn't Hasbro see that they're selling successfully and produce more?

.

Genocidicles:

Therumancer:
... Or (as I pointed out below) are all the toys being bought out so fast that the girls just can't reliably find any in the course of regular shopping. :)

Well if that was the case then why wouldn't Hasbro see that they're selling successfully and produce more?

No, because as I explained in the longer post I referenced that their reliable market is collectors who tend to do long term business when it comes to trading figures. If they over produce the figures then it reduces the value of the ones in circulation, and that means collectors will stop buying their stuff. At the end of the day sales to kids who play with the toys are a small business, especially nowadays, even if you drive all of them away your going to sell more to the fans. Years ago it would have been a lot different, as there wasn't as much of a collectors/fan trade, and also kids still played with toys a lot, the toy industry has been kind of gutted by video games.

As a general rule action figures get produced in limited batches of so many figures. Once a given figure has been sold out they eventually do another series of figures.

As I pointed out, I very much doubt these figures aren't out there, it's just that your not going to find one by stopping by the local toy store or Wal*Mart. You'll need to check Ebay or various cons, and typically the people there will want between three and five times the retail price, but then again they aren't selling to kids who are going to play with them, and they know eventually they will find fans to pay for "Star Wars" stuff and as time goes on they will just keep raising the price as that specific run of figures becomes more and more of a historical footnote.

It's sort of like the "Skylanders" figures, one of the scarce ones was apparently "Ninjinni" originally, they produced tons of them but they vanished from shelves, especially the "Scarlet" ones very quickly apparently (not a Skylanders fan, I just heard about it). It's not that they produced only a handful of them because nobody wanted to play with a girl, it was because it was a cool display figure (being fairly human looking) and also people were heavily speculating on it's value along with other Skylanders. The idea is the batches sell out, people want the figures for the collection, and the dude who bought 30 of them as soon as they came into the store can now make a profit selling well above retail.

In short, knowing how this business works, I believe Hasbro did indeed produce a lot of these figures, as much as the other ones. I simply think the speculators and resale crowd predicted a demand and got there. If you really want one for your daughter, or yourself, I very much doubt you couldn't find one if you put in the effort. Of course when you find one your probably going to be dropping a decent amount. I'd be very surprised if there aren't guys with shelves full of them going around between Comic Cons and things like that.

mad825:
I fail to understand on how this article trying to say it's a problem. Are we in some kind of bizarre USSR state demanding that there must be full female representation in everything?

да

Maze1125:
Only in America would institutionalised sexism get repeatedly "justified" by referencing capitalism and "freedom"...

No, ancient Athens would do that too, of course in their own language and slightly modified, you can't tell me the Funeral oration of Pericles isn't some vague freedom rant. Then again, this is the only state in history that people give two flying fucks about sexism at all.

piscian:
Part of me wants to be sympathetic, but I'm uncomfortably gonna side with the " Omg please go take your feminist whining somewhere else!". I say this despite being a feminist because as far as I know there's never been an equality issue in Hasbros toyline. I own a goddamn Mon Mothma action figure and she's not even a cool character. I highly suspect the people complaining could not actually give a shit about the characters its just controversy to click bait with.

I'm sure Hasbo will release the rest of the characters they always do. Chill the fuck out. This is why people don't respect affirmative action movements. Its hard to take Al Sharpton seriously when he shows up with lawyers every time a black guy gets a speeding ticket.
...

The complaint of "not enough female character toys" is subjective, but there are also some odd glaring issues as well.

As mentioned in the article, Disney's online store for the Star Wars franchise had no Princess Leia toys. It's one thing to complain about parity, but if there is no representation for a major character (regardless of gender), then then I have to say "WTF". Disney only decided to include a Princess Leia figure AFTER consumers made an issue of it. They never had any intention of making such a product.

People have mentioned that there are several female characters in "Star Wars: Rebels" that have never had merchandise. If these are major story characters, then I can see why fans would be upset.

I'm a big fan of R2-D2. If there were no R2-D2 toys, I would be ranting on a Disney forum myself.

keniakittykat:

ZiggyE:

keniakittykat:

It's not about a shortage of star wars figures, not really. It's about toy companies not wanting to sell, or sell to girls.

Hasbro does sell to girls. In fact it has many female orientated properties. The issue is girls don't want to buy star wars. That isn't sexism.

You're completely missing the point, here. It is not that there aren't any popular licenses for girls, it's that merchandisers don't want to sell originally male-oriented properties to girls because they have an unfounded fear of losing their money.
While not really sexism, it's more of a chicken and egg concept; aren't girls buying the toys because they just aren't interested, or aren't they buying because no one is making them?

...do you have sales data on hand? Or is this baseless conjecture based on your opinion and anecdotal evidence? I have no horse in this race personally, but if there is data to back this up I'd love to see it.

And no, the Young Justice thing is not enough. Yeah, I know what they said, and I was rather upset at the time because I loved that show. However, I don't have the data. Would the unintentional new female demographic buy Young Justice merchandise? It seems to me that this only really works out when the unintentional demographic turns out to be young adult males, who will buy pretty much /any/ kind of merchandise. Yeah, that's anecdotal as well. I only ever personally witnessed it with the recent MLP tv series.

But then, again, I would like to see the data that says that it would be marketable.

I doubt that it's true, but it would be hilarious if this was Hasbro showing signs of frustration with the ongoing demand for more and more female Transformers. Thus are Transformers fans not just content with ruining our own toy lines and fandom, we have to stop everyone else from having fun too!

I am all for consumers making a fuss if a product they want isn't being produced. It makes perfect sense for those who feel under represented to make it very clear what they want to see. These are the kinds of actions that speak to companies. If you're a Star Wars fan and want more female characters made into toys, yell it from the mountaintops.

However, it lacks sense to act as if representation in commercial products is an issue of justice or ethics. Companies do not owe anyone a product they want unless said product is a public good. Clearly, action figures are not a public good. In fact, I can't think of any product that representation would be an issue that is a public good. (By public good here, I mean a product which is necessary for basic living, like utilities.)

So, I encourage and applaud those who make it clear to companies that they desire specific products. Hell, companies often very much want that kind of feedback anyway. I do not encourage demanding these products on the grounds that anyone is owed them. People are doing nothing wrong by asking for products that suit them and companies are doing nothing wrong by looking at their sales data and declining.

So I can break down an individual upc's sales based on geographic location, demographics, shelf location, see its supply in the market down to the exact location in the store updated live , get an average daily loss from OOS, forecast demand based on a near infinite set of parameters... But its sexism why decisions are made? Not the fact I can pull up data and see that auto price reductions have hit certain characters cause they don't sell or that the buyers team has product in the chain that is projected to sell more/higher margin?

Its like when I worked for a big red beverage company I knew down to the case what a store sold. People always ask why don't you stock this flavor its really popular here we love it and i'd pull up the data from when it was in and it wouldn't even break 1 case a week hence why it was pulled...Space is expensive as hell not gonna waste it on something that doesn't move despite protestations to the contrary.

Hasbro is a company, they are in for the money. If they aren't making more female rebel toys, it's because they aren't selling as well as the male rebel toys. There is no conspiracy or agenda behind it. They make things that the market demands. If there is no demand, they won't be making it. That's how every industry works. You don't see anyone asking for Samsung or Sony to make more of the TV's that are in stock. So why are people asking for more of these? Having more won't make them magically sell more. If they managed to somehow create demand out of thin air, they would be the single most successful company in human existence. Do you honestly believe someone would say no to all the money just because he wants less females? I don't think so.

mad825:
I fail to understand on how this article trying to say it's a problem. Are we in some kind of bizarre USSR state demanding that there must be full female representation in everything?

Actually yeah, and it's been an on-going thing for quite a while.

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