Hearthstone Player's Dad Makes Him Pick College or Game Tournament

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Hearthstone Player's Dad Makes Him Pick College or Game Tournament

Hearthstone player Marcus Kwak recently backed out of a professional Hearthstone tournament after his father threatened to cut him off financially.

While video games are far more accepted in the present day they were in the past, the hobby and the people invested in it still often have to face down a stigma that's arguably unique when compared to other forms of entertainment. For many gamers this, at worst, amounts to a nagging annoyance. People making comments, rolling their eyes or otherwise just treating you like you're immature for enjoying electronic game (as opposed to hitting a ball with a stick or something). For some however, negative views of video games can and do result into the loss of real opportunities.

Hearthstone player Marcus Kwak, for instance, recently found himself forced to choose between a chance to compete in a professional Hearthstone tournament and finishing his final year of college. Kwak recently qualified for the ESL Legendary Series season 2 finals. This feat earned him an opportunity to take an all-expenses paid trip to compete in the California tournament for a share of a $25,000 prize. Unfortunately for Kwak, doing so also meant discussing it with his parents who have been paying for his education and dislike video games.

"I told my dad and it was an immediate no," he said on Reddit. "The decision that came down was I either give up my spot and not play in the LAN and stay under the support of my family, or I go and play but pack my things and leave home and I get all support cut off from my parents." Unable to find an alternative residence for the summer and knowing he wouldn't be able to pay for his final year of college, Kwak decided to postpone his professional gaming aspirations, back out of the tournament and complete his schooling. "I only have [one] more year left," he wrote in an update. "[I] might as well finish it all the way through then decide what comes next."

We're not going to say he made the wrong choice given the circumstances but still, that's one hell of a way for a parent to respond to a free trip to go win money. Granted, we haven't heard their side of things, but we're honestly not sure how you can justify a threat of that severity over something like this. Let us know if any of you have ever faced a similar situation.

Source: Reddit

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Erm, good? At what point did it become acceptable to question whether or not computer games were a viable alternative to education?

I logged in, to post this for you!

Education as it is, is a horrible way to make money. It's a time sink, a money sink, and there are much better opportunities available to those who didn't actually do that education thing. The only reason to do ANY higher education is if it is a hard requirement for your chosen profession. I know many people older than me who make less money, have less enjoyment in life, with more debt, all because when they went to school, I got the job they went to school to get.

On Topic: Probably the best decision, if you are already 3/4 of the way through free college, might as well finish it, life can be hard without family support. and if you make them happy, they may be more forthcoming about understand you later. So I think he made the right choice.

...For one tournament? Is that really going to ruin his education? I can safely presume my parents know I'm mature enough to manage both things.

And hey if he wins that's free money.

I find it odd that they made him choose like he was going down some dark path to card games all day everyday like some bad joke yu-gi-oh villain.

I can understand why the parents would prefer having their kid(s) focus more on school, rather than on games. Especially since the parents were fully paying for their kid(s) education, and are entitled to rules regarding the education they are paying for.

But threatening to essentially kick their kid out onto the street, with absolutely 0 financial support, just goes to show how spiteful their parent(s) is/are. I am sure the parents are frustrated, as I have a feeling this decision was not made because of a single tournament. But any parent, willing to essentially abandon their kid(s), who has admitted that they do not have enough money even to pay for their last year of college (meaning they are either broke, or next to broke), should be ashamed of themselves.

If you are not willing to take the good with the bad, when deciding to have kids, and are not willing to make sacrifices that your kids probably will take for granted, then in no capacity should you be having kids, except for selfish purposes.

But I digress - I do not take stories such as these, as 100% accurate. For all I know, there is a huge gap of information not being shared, which would render my opinion moot. I accept that as a possibility. :)

Good.
His parents payed for his education and supported him up to this point, as he says, this is his final year, if he fucks it up that was a life time of money wasted, just for a stupid virtual card game. He can still play this professionally after he's finished his education. There is absolutely no point in jeopardizing his education for a tournament, even if it's as awesome as this.

Plus, he stated he started playing seriously in December, which coupled with the fact that he qualified for this tournament, I believe he's been concentrating more on this than his studies.

Another captcha? Seriously, every time I post I get one of these.

Good. His education is more important than a pro gaming career. His parents have the right idea.

Grouchy Imp:
Erm, good? At what point did it become acceptable to question whether or not computer games were a viable alternative to education?

Clive Howlitzer:
Good. His education is more important than a pro gaming career. His parents have the right idea.

Normally I'd agree with both of you, but classes in most post secondary area's are either wrapping up or finished now. I don't know his exact school, but its likely the same deal, he's probably done classes and is just home now, so frankly this makes little sense to me. Sounds like many parents I deal with at work, just disliking video games because the media they consume dislikes them.

Chefsbrian:

Grouchy Imp:
Erm, good? At what point did it become acceptable to question whether or not computer games were a viable alternative to education?

Clive Howlitzer:
Good. His education is more important than a pro gaming career. His parents have the right idea.

Normally I'd agree with both of you, but classes in most post secondary area's are either wrapping up or finished now. I don't know his exact school, but its likely the same deal, he's probably done classes and is just home now, so frankly this makes little sense to me. Sounds like many parents I deal with at work, just disliking video games because the media they consume dislikes them.

It might sound cruel but if his parents are paying for his education and he lives at home for free. His parents call the shots. That is the price you pay for living at home. Also, I feel like going down the road of 'pro-gamer' is one he'll regret later. The average 'pro-gamer' will earn far less than someone with even a decent career elsewhere. It is also something that while it might seem cool to do now, will rapidly fall out of later.

GarouxBloodline:
But threatening to essentially kick their kid out onto the street, with absolutely 0 financial support, just goes to show how spiteful their parent(s) is/are.

It might not be a fair thing to so, but it is understandable why it happens. If they disagree with you about something that they feel is important to your well-being, then they will tug on any string that they think will get you to agree. If they can't control you, then they can control their money. I had a similar thing happen to me while in college but I had a job so I cut myself loose. It was a fairly innocuous issue (more of a straw the broke the camels back thing) so I could easily see the same thing be the case here.

Dach:

GarouxBloodline:
But threatening to essentially kick their kid out onto the street, with absolutely 0 financial support, just goes to show how spiteful their parent(s) is/are.

It might not be a fair thing to so, but it is understandable why it happens. If they disagree with you about something that they feel is important to your well-being, then they will tug on any string that they think will get you to agree. If they can't control you, then they can control their money. I had a similar thing happen to me while in college but I had a job so I cut myself loose. It was a fairly innocuous issue (more of a straw the broke the camels back thing) so I could easily see the same thing be the case here.

It comes down to perspective. Parents think that throwing their kids into the deep-end of the pool, by throwing them out into the streets with almost nothing to their name, will do them good and help them figure out their lives. I cannot begin to tell you, just how many friends I have had, that have had this done to them. And do you know what happens?

I have had friends turn to drugs, because without a house, education or good credit, and without enough money to buy clean clothes for interviews, they were turned down and resorted to selling drugs.

There was one girl I knew, who was cut off financially during college, because her parents did not approve of her fiance. She had a job working as hostess, but it was not enough, and she was eventually busted for prostitution, because she could barely make enough to finish her education, and take care of her kid.

More than others, with no options really available without family or a home to turn to, just became yet more cannon fodder/floor-scrubbers in the military, with most either being sent to Iraq, or being discharged because of the recent cut-backs in the American military. Again, with nowhere to go.

It is selfish, and I reiterate: if you are not willing to take the good with the bad, and you are not willing to make sacrifices, while at the same time understanding that your kid(s) will likely take your sacrifices for granted, then in no way are you justified to be a proper parent, except for selfish purposes.

I'm actually kind of amused by this. Classes are important in college, true. But they are far from the only reason people should go. Networking is arguably more important than classwork for many degrees. Which yes can often take the form of things that appear to just be for fun, but they're often more than that.

How often has this guy traveled? Doing it on another person's dime is a fantastic way that doesn't appear much. Who knows what friends he might have made? I'd say his parents are being sadly shortsighted. I sure as hell would have let my kid gone, especially as it wouldn't have cost me a damn thing.

I go and play but pack my things and leave home and I get all support cut off from my parents.

Also, parents that do this are jackasses. There's no defense for that kind of behavior.

Charli:

And hey if he wins that's free money.

That's the deal breaking. If he had lost then quiting college was all for nothing well he got next year but it would be a struggle college wise.

OT- Hard to say, while I don't like Esport myself but I know what it like being screwed over from higher education (granted I never regret choosing it since otherwise I wouldn't had made fantastic friends from that course).

Still why do I get a feeling he could had gotten some kind of a support from a crowdfunding (or maybe not). I have a sinking feeling we may seen a future open letter from some loser to stop parent to stopping their children dream of competing in Esport!

Grouchy Imp:
Erm, good? At what point did it become acceptable to question whether or not computer games were a viable alternative to education?

Dead Metal:
Good.
His parents payed for his education and supported him up to this point, as he says, this is his final year, if he fucks it up that was a life time of money wasted, just for a stupid virtual card game. He can still play this professionally after he's finished his education. There is absolutely no point in jeopardizing his education for a tournament, even if it's as awesome as this.

Plus, he stated he started playing seriously in December, which coupled with the fact that he qualified for this tournament, I believe he's been concentrating more on this than his studies.

Another captcha? Seriously, every time I post I get one of these.

Clive Howlitzer:
Good. His education is more important than a pro gaming career. His parents have the right idea.

Did you guys even read the article? This was not an either or thing until his parents made it so. It was a 1 week all expenses paid trip in the middle of the summer semester. And we know for sure this guy was not going to school during the summer because he is going to be moving back home for the summer to live with his parents.

This is not a case of his parents preventing him throwing away his education, this is a case of his parents preventing him doing something productive and fun with that week instead of sitting on his ass doing nothing. There is absolutely no threat to his education here, so that excuse is total bullshit. The trip is all expenses paid so neither the parents or the student have anything to lose. The only possible motivation here is an attempt to sabotage this guys prospects as a pro, either because they do not approve and are embarrassed of him (which is an extremely likely scenario) or from some misguided attempt to force him down the proper path in life, which never ends well.

Now, the guy made the right choice, finishing the degree is more important than going to one tournament. But the parents are morons, especially the dad.

PS. As for this guy compromising his studies to qualify for this tourney, I don't buy it. Even a full time student has a ton of free time if he doesn't have a job or any other responsibilities, and hearthstone is a relatively simple game compared to most esport titles. If this was LOL or Starcraft, then probably. But hearthstone is not like those.

Clive Howlitzer:
His parents call the shots.

It absolutely is the case that the parents can choose to remove their financial backing and force their 18+ yr old kid out the door. But there are more ethical cases (your kid is becoming a drug selling meth head) and not-so-ethical cases (your kid might have a slightly lower GPA, possibly hurting their job prospects out of college). There are people I know from high school that have crashed and burned after finishing college since their parents dictated everything for them prior and people who messed up in high school/college but are doing fine now. People have to be allowed to make some mistake or they won't learn, even if there are SOME lasting problems that crop up because of that mistake.

GarouxBloodline:
Parents think that throwing their kids into the deep-end of the pool, by throwing them out into the streets with almost nothing to their name, will do them good and help them figure out their lives.

Hm, I've never seen someone who felt this about their own child, though I could see some people who might think this way. I'd speculate that most parents threaten the financial separation either because they feel that their child isn't taking responsibility for their future (NEET issues) or as a way to leverage their child to obey them not initially intending to follow through.

I feel that is a shitty thing his dad is doing to him. Saying no to an all expenses paid trip to a tournament where he has a chance at winning up to $25k? Why the hell not? This is from the perspective of someone who has never had any help from his parents but that just seems stupid from my viewpoint.

Dach:

Clive Howlitzer:
His parents call the shots.

It absolutely is the case that the parents can choose to remove their financial backing and force their 18+ yr old kid out the door. But there are more ethical cases (your kid is becoming a drug selling meth head) and not-so-ethical cases (your kid might have a slightly lower GPA, possibly hurting their job prospects out of college). There are people I know from high school that have crashed and burned after finishing college since their parents dictated everything for them prior and people who messed up in high school/college but are doing fine now. People have to be allowed to make some mistake or they won't learn, even if there are SOME lasting problems that crop up because of that mistake.

GarouxBloodline:
Parents think that throwing their kids into the deep-end of the pool, by throwing them out into the streets with almost nothing to their name, will do them good and help them figure out their lives.

Hm, I've never seen someone who felt this about their own child, though I could see some people who might think this way. I'd speculate that most parents threaten the financial separation either because they feel that their child isn't taking responsibility for their future (NEET issues) or as a way to leverage their child to obey them not initially intending to follow through.

Empty threats are not all that bad - when children grow older, sometimes that is all a parent can do anymore. Especially if the kid grows up to be a narcissist/sadist. Consider my words referring only to those parents that disown/abandon/financially abandon their kids. Your kid could be the world's largest asshole. But they are your responsibility, and turning your back on them only makes everything worse.

GarouxBloodline:

Empty threats are not all that bad - when children grow older, sometimes that is all a parent can do anymore. Especially if the kid grows up to be a narcissist/sadist. Consider my words referring only to those parents that disown/abandon/financially abandon their kids. Your kid could be the world's largest asshole. But they are your responsibility, and turning your back on them only makes everything worse.

Ideally parents shouldn't have to threaten their children at all, but I understand your point. There is an issue when an empty threat is made, though. If the child calls the bluff, do you follow through, thinking that they will eventually come around, or cave and basically never have leverage again and the child is still doing what the parent thinks they should not? There is an "easy" solution and that is to only threaten it if the perceived impact of the 'bad thing' the child is doing is worse for them than suddenly losing all financial backing. That means, though, that anything short of that, the child must be allowed to make their own mistakes and suffer the consequences.

As a parent, I don't think it's a problem for a 21 year old child to go to a video game tournament in the middle of summer. However, let's imagine that you live at home and part of that environment includes getting a job to help pay for living expenses during school. Nobody can land a job with a week cut out of the middle of the summer. And that's just one possibility for the "other side" of the story. Maybe there is a family trip he has to disrupt (albeit a worse excuse, but this might be a very family-first culture). Who knows?

However, this thought that the parents are being selfish, I'm fighting the urge to say meaner things than just "shut up". If he wants to go, there's nothing stopping him. He can get a damn job and take a semester off. No one's forcing him to take his parents' money.

And if getting money from your parents is the only thing keeping someone from being a drug addled prostitute, it was an unhealthy codependent relationship to begin with and better off broken.

I think he made the right choice. Putting that much work and effort into college, and being that close to finishing, it would be really sad to just throw it all away.

I am curious as to why his dad would respond that harshly over something like this. Was he struggling with his classes? Is he a slacker? Or is his dad really that closed-minded?

JSRevenge:
As a parent, I don't think it's a problem for a 21 year old child to go to a video game tournament in the middle of summer. However, let's imagine that you live at home and part of that environment includes getting a job to help pay for living expenses during school. Nobody can land a job with a week cut out of the middle of the summer. And that's just one possibility for the "other side" of the story. Maybe there is a family trip he has to disrupt (albeit a worse excuse, but this might be a very family-first culture). Who knows?

However, this thought that the parents are being selfish, I'm fighting the urge to say meaner things than just "shut up". If he wants to go, there's nothing stopping him. He can get a damn job and take a semester off. No one's forcing him to take his parents' money.

And if getting money from your parents is the only thing keeping someone from being a drug addled prostitute, it was an unhealthy codependent relationship to begin with and better off broken.

I am interesting in a response from you - what jobs, hire those that are in college? And in-case you are not aware, most legitimate businesses will check to see if you are either in college, or have taken time off before finishing a semester/year. I can certainly say, with absolute clarity, that most college-students, born in middle-class or lower, will not be able to get a job that pays more than 20-30k a year. And that is only if they worked full-time, instead of part-time.

I am also interested in your opinion as to how, in the current economy of America, at least, that you can expect some kid straight out of school, with little job experience, will find a reasonable solution, within a reasonable time-span, of getting back on their feet after being thrown out with little to nothing? I am very interested in your opinion on this, because I was forced into homelessness for around 2 years after I graduated from school, before I was able to get back on my feet. And that was only because I got a lucky break.

Oh my heart bleeds for him, his parents are paying for his education with in America most people have to take loans out to go to college, and his parents pay for his living.
Until he starts paying his own way through life he doesn't call the shots so get over it don't bitch when you don't get to do what you wan't when your parents pay for everything.

DrOswald:

Grouchy Imp:
Erm, good? At what point did it become acceptable to question whether or not computer games were a viable alternative to education?

Did you guys even read the article? This was not an either or thing until his parents made it so. It was a 1 week all expenses paid trip in the middle of the summer semester. And we know for sure this guy was not going to school during the summer because he is going to be moving back home for the summer to live with his parents.

This is not a case of his parents preventing him throwing away his education, this is a case of his parents preventing him doing something productive and fun with that week instead of sitting on his ass doing nothing. There is absolutely no threat to his education here, so that excuse is total bullshit. The trip is all expenses paid so neither the parents or the student have anything to lose. The only possible motivation here is an attempt to sabotage this guys prospects as a pro, either because they do not approve and are embarrassed of him (which is an extremely likely scenario) or from some misguided attempt to force him down the proper path in life, which never ends well.

Now, the guy made the right choice, finishing the degree is more important than going to one tournament. But the parents are morons, especially the dad.

PS. As for this guy compromising his studies to qualify for this tourney, I don't buy it. Even a full time student has a ton of free time if he doesn't have a job or any other responsibilities, and hearthstone is a relatively simple game compared to most esport titles. If this was LOL or Starcraft, then probably. But hearthstone is not like those.

Ok, how can I go about explaining this? If the kid is paying for his own education then he can spend his downtime how he likes. But if his folks are paying for his education then he owes it to his family to spend his downtime in such a way as to ensure that they get bang for their buck. If I fronted up hard-earned dollar to get my kid into college, I'd expect them to direct their energies toward study, not gaming. And I'd question your statement that students have a "ton of free time" as most students are run into the ground with coursework, to the point that two lasses I know would be hard-pushed to tell you what day of the week it is.

Is this the part where we all judge someone else's parenting without having all the facts? Bonus points if you still live with your own parents.

I don't see the newsworthiness of this article. Seems like a private affair to me.

I guess that's what news sites are reduced to these days, though. Updating you on what happened yesterday on Reddit.

It makes me wonder how the parents would've felt if this was a football tournament or some other physical sport. Sounds like the parents just hate video games on the whole and don't care what it's being used for, especially with the "immediate no" part. If he's placed this far it's fair to say he's pretty good at Hearthstone (or using Facehunter, cough cough...) and many people are making a decent life in the professional gaming world.

Yeah parents might have the final say at the moment, but I bet he'll make more money as a pro gamer than his major.

GarouxBloodline:

JSRevenge:
As a parent, I don't think it's a problem for a 21 year old child to go to a video game tournament in the middle of summer. However, let's imagine that you live at home and part of that environment includes getting a job to help pay for living expenses during school. Nobody can land a job with a week cut out of the middle of the summer. And that's just one possibility for the "other side" of the story. Maybe there is a family trip he has to disrupt (albeit a worse excuse, but this might be a very family-first culture). Who knows?

However, this thought that the parents are being selfish, I'm fighting the urge to say meaner things than just "shut up". If he wants to go, there's nothing stopping him. He can get a damn job and take a semester off. No one's forcing him to take his parents' money.

And if getting money from your parents is the only thing keeping someone from being a drug addled prostitute, it was an unhealthy codependent relationship to begin with and better off broken.

I am interesting in a response from you - what jobs, hire those that are in college? And in-case you are not aware, most legitimate businesses will check to see if you are either in college, or have taken time off before finishing a semester/year. I can certainly say, with absolute clarity, that most college-students, born in middle-class or lower, will not be able to get a job that pays more than 20-30k a year. And that is only if they worked full-time, instead of part-time.

I am also interested in your opinion as to how, in the current economy of America, at least, that you can expect some kid straight out of school, with little job experience, will find a reasonable solution, within a reasonable time-span, of getting back on their feet after being thrown out with little to nothing? I am very interested in your opinion on this, because I was forced into homelessness for around 2 years after I graduated from school, before I was able to get back on my feet. And that was only because I got a lucky break.

You obviously have a bone to pick because you were ungrateful for your parents' generosity.

I held a job every summer between school years, even took summer classes (summer school - another reason his parents might have said no). You can hold a job too if you cultivate a working relationship with an employer such that they want you back. You can even mow lawn, if you were so inclined. Besides, you're conflating "summer job" with "supporting yourself". Also, it's possible to work an entry level job (at a paltry 20-30k) while gaining experience. A lot of people in the comments seem to think college is a waste of time anyway.

honestly these parents should be slapped for stupidity. Seriously if your willing to ruin your relationship with your son over a FREE TRIP to play in a video game tournament that he can win real money then you do not deserve to be a parent. trust me ive seen what happens in these instances at best they will get a Christmas phone call every year after doing something like this.

Eh, I don't know if I would have done the same as them, but I also understand on some level. If they feel that his devotion to the game is hindering his education, they have every right to say something since they are footing the bill. I also see we are hearing from one side. They may have said, "we don't want you doing this, we would rather you devote yourself to something that is permanent such as trying to find a summer internship or something like that". Then it got heated because he really wanted to play, everyone got mad and said things they didn't mean ("I hate you dad!" or "You will either listen to us or you can pay for your own college and find your own place to live!"), and then he withdraws. We just don't know anything about the situation besides what one 21 year old guy said.

Just one more parent that thinks that he owns a slave rather than a child. He should finish college and give a huge fuck you to his dad. Going to the tournament didn't mean he would lose a year. His father sounds like an asshole who wants his kid to spend his free time the wants rather than how the kid wants. Well "kid", since he goes to college.

Grouchy Imp:
Ok, how can I go about explaining this? If the kid is paying for his own education then he can spend his downtime how he likes. But if his folks are paying for his education then he owes it to his family to spend his downtime in such a way as to ensure that they get bang for their buck. If I fronted up hard-earned dollar to get my kid into college, I'd expect them to direct their energies toward study, not gaming. And I'd question your statement that students have a "ton of free time" as most students are run into the ground with coursework, to the point that two lasses I know would be hard-pushed to tell you what day of the week it is.

Any parent that's so strict on making their kids study THAT damn much is not a parent that is doing their child any favors. This was a week long trip in the middle of summer when almost all college classes across the nation are out. Surely a college guy can take one single week of time to go do something fun and exciting while taking a break from their studies? It'd be different if all of his final tests were during that week and he'd flunk the semester if he went, but that is not the case here.

Scarim Coral:

Charli:

And hey if he wins that's free money.

That's the deal breaking. If he had lost then quiting college was all for nothing well he got next year but it would be a struggle college wise.

OT- Hard to say, while I don't like Esport myself but I know what it like being screwed over from higher education (granted I never regret choosing it since otherwise I wouldn't had made fantastic friends from that course).

Still why do I get a feeling he could had gotten some kind of a support from a crowdfunding (or maybe not). I have a sinking feeling we may seen a future open letter from some loser to stop parent to stopping their children dream of competing in Esport!

The reason I said that was because earlier I said, why would he have to choose, why is a collage aged adult not able to do both, surely the tournament is not more than a weekend? You do it, you either win or lose, and you go home, what's the big fucking deal?

Or do these people not realise that?

So asking him to 'choose your path!' is ultimately ...well pointless. It's a game tournament, some of the people who play in them are some of the most studious people I know. Very few abandon their studies to game full time, you'd have to be sponsored majorly for that.

If we had more context, perhaps he was doing badly in college earlier in his education, then they might be more justified, but the way this is presented is just... sad.

Kajin:

Grouchy Imp:
Ok, how can I go about explaining this? If the kid is paying for his own education then he can spend his downtime how he likes. But if his folks are paying for his education then he owes it to his family to spend his downtime in such a way as to ensure that they get bang for their buck. If I fronted up hard-earned dollar to get my kid into college, I'd expect them to direct their energies toward study, not gaming. And I'd question your statement that students have a "ton of free time" as most students are run into the ground with coursework, to the point that two lasses I know would be hard-pushed to tell you what day of the week it is.

Any parent that's so strict on making their kids study THAT damn much is not a parent that is doing their child any favors. This was a week long trip in the middle of summer when almost all college classes across the nation are out. Surely a college guy can take one single week of time to go do something fun and exciting while taking a break from their studies? It'd be different if all of his final tests were during that week and he'd flunk the semester if he went, but that is not the case here.

If this was one week out of a summer break I'd agree with you, 100%. But this kid qualified for a national tournament. You don't get to that level by idly picking up a game for 10 mins of downtime, you've got to put some serious hours into a hobby to get shortlisted for nationals. I'm not saying this kid should be denied a week's break, I'm saying that the kid must have spent months previous to this playing match after match after match in order to become eligible for the nationals, time which his parents clearly feel that he should have been spending studying.

Grouchy Imp:

Kajin:

Grouchy Imp:
Ok, how can I go about explaining this? If the kid is paying for his own education then he can spend his downtime how he likes. But if his folks are paying for his education then he owes it to his family to spend his downtime in such a way as to ensure that they get bang for their buck. If I fronted up hard-earned dollar to get my kid into college, I'd expect them to direct their energies toward study, not gaming. And I'd question your statement that students have a "ton of free time" as most students are run into the ground with coursework, to the point that two lasses I know would be hard-pushed to tell you what day of the week it is.

Any parent that's so strict on making their kids study THAT damn much is not a parent that is doing their child any favors. This was a week long trip in the middle of summer when almost all college classes across the nation are out. Surely a college guy can take one single week of time to go do something fun and exciting while taking a break from their studies? It'd be different if all of his final tests were during that week and he'd flunk the semester if he went, but that is not the case here.

If this was one week out of a summer break I'd agree with you, 100%. But this kid qualified for a national tournament. You don't get to that level by idly picking up a game for 10 mins of downtime, you've got to put some serious hours into a hobby to get shortlisted for nationals. I'm not saying this kid should be denied a week's break, I'm saying that the kid must have spent months previous to this playing match after match after match in order to become eligible for the nationals, time which his parents clearly feel that he should have been spending studying.

Can't you do both? I certainly did. I have six years of college under my belt and I gamed an average of two to six hours every day after class depending on the levels of homework and how much studying I felt I needed to do. I certainly didn't focus all my efforts into becoming a pro at one game, but I was definitely still able to fit in a lot of game time and still fucking managed to pass my classes. This isn't an all-or-nothing one-or-the-other situation. He could have certainly done both and, from all reports I've seen, was definitely making do with both just fine.

Grouchy Imp:

DrOswald:

Grouchy Imp:
Erm, good? At what point did it become acceptable to question whether or not computer games were a viable alternative to education?

Did you guys even read the article? This was not an either or thing until his parents made it so. It was a 1 week all expenses paid trip in the middle of the summer semester. And we know for sure this guy was not going to school during the summer because he is going to be moving back home for the summer to live with his parents.

This is not a case of his parents preventing him throwing away his education, this is a case of his parents preventing him doing something productive and fun with that week instead of sitting on his ass doing nothing. There is absolutely no threat to his education here, so that excuse is total bullshit. The trip is all expenses paid so neither the parents or the student have anything to lose. The only possible motivation here is an attempt to sabotage this guys prospects as a pro, either because they do not approve and are embarrassed of him (which is an extremely likely scenario) or from some misguided attempt to force him down the proper path in life, which never ends well.

Now, the guy made the right choice, finishing the degree is more important than going to one tournament. But the parents are morons, especially the dad.

PS. As for this guy compromising his studies to qualify for this tourney, I don't buy it. Even a full time student has a ton of free time if he doesn't have a job or any other responsibilities, and hearthstone is a relatively simple game compared to most esport titles. If this was LOL or Starcraft, then probably. But hearthstone is not like those.

Ok, how can I go about explaining this? If the kid is paying for his own education then he can spend his downtime how he likes. But if his folks are paying for his education then he owes it to his family to spend his downtime in such a way as to ensure that they get bang for their buck. If I fronted up hard-earned dollar to get my kid into college, I'd expect them to direct their energies toward study, not gaming. And I'd question your statement that students have a "ton of free time" as most students are run into the ground with coursework, to the point that two lasses I know would be hard-pushed to tell you what day of the week it is.

I am working full time, I am raising a child, I take 12 credit hours a semester (full time at my university) and I still manage to get a fair bit of gaming in.

A full time student should be spending around 48 hours a week on average on their studies, max 60 (if they are the over achieving type.) There are 168 hours in a week. Say 10 hours a day on surviving (meals, sleep, etc.) and we have at least 38 hours left over.

Going to school is hard as hell, but pretending it takes all your time is ridiculous. Every single full time student I know who doesn't work and isn't providing for a family has a highly active social life, with the sole exception of the crazy people trying to do nearly double full time credit hours.

And lets be frank here, if you think "down time" should be spent doing nothing but study you are setting up your children for academic failure. 99% of people will burn out if they do nothing but study and it will, no matter what, cause their grades to suffer. This is because excessive stress interferes with mental processes. After a certain point you need to relax.

Lets consider these two students you know. Do you really think their academic achievements are improved for being so overloaded with coursework they can't think strait enough to keep track of the day of the week? Maybe these girls should pull back a bit and get a hobby so they don't drive themselves into a mental breakdown.

Sniper Team 4:
I am curious as to why his dad would respond that harshly over something like this. Was he struggling with his classes? Is he a slacker? Or is his dad really that closed-minded?

I think this is the most important contextual piece of information we are missing.

If he is already performing well in studies then his gaming obviously isn't affecting it negatively and thus he should be free to compete. If, however, his studies are going poorly then the amount of time/money he has been spending on Hearthstone is highly likely to be a cause of this.

Verdict? Needs more data.

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