3D Printed Batman Costume May Appear in Guinness World Records

3D Printed Batman Costume May Appear in Guinness World Records

batmancosplay

Owner of Order 66 Creatures and Effects Julian Checkley has been contacted by Guinness World Records Gamers' Edition regarding this sensational 3D printed batsuit.

Update: Julian Checkley has been contacted by a representative of Guinness, who has requested that the specific categories the batsuit is being considered for be removed from the article. The original story has been updated to reflect these changes.

Original Story: The Guinness World Records Gamers' Edition has reached out to Order 66 owner Julian Checkley, whose batsuit is being considered for several acknowledgements in an upcoming edition. The suit features video screens in the gauntlets, folding batarangs, a grapnel gun, and even a working fireball shooter, with lasers that project the bat signal being added.

Checkley founded Order 66, a "tiny little setup" in Galway, on the West Coast of Ireland, after spending 20 years working in the film and TV industry in the U.K.

"Recently we stepped away from our traditional method of creating costumes (which would be a rather lengthy and intricate process of sculpting, casting, and rendering) and ventured into the realm of 3D printing," Checkley said. As his facility does not yet have the means to 3D print the parts, they outsourced to Gauntlet FX in Canada.

The chest plate and the harder parts of the design were 3D printed, and the suit was hand-painted using airbrushing techniques. While creating costumes like this, to this standard, would "cost North of 8000 euro including all the gadgets," 3D printing has cut the total production time in half while still maintaining an accurate design.

The elaborate costume was crafted in the style of Batman: Arkham Origins, with the intention of releasing alongside Batman: Arkham Knight. "We wanted to ride the PR wave a little bit," Checkley admitted. "But this was quite unprecedented." Checkley admits that he is "quite humbled" by the response to the costume. Checkley was also the one lucky enough to wear the costume, which brought his 6-foot-6 frame to an even more imposing nearly 7 feet tall. The biggest challenge at that point? Mastering the scowl.

We also asked Checkley to share his "top picks" of his work over the years. While the Batsuit was the first to incorporate a functional fireball shooter, the others are no less impressive in design, featuring Darth Malgus, the Sith Stalker, Darth Vader, Bane, and of course, an 8'4" Wookiee.

You can also see Batman, Tarfful, and Darth Malgus in action below.

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If I saw that guy in person wearing that suit, my inner child couldn't stop giggling. It's freakin' Batman. LOOK AT HIM!

Working fireball shooter? Ok, that seems a bit questionably wise.

Do want.

Wait, how? I mean aren't the materials used in 3d printing are kinda soft since it has to be cut easily?

Either way, that's pretty impressive.

Now this looks rather impressive!

Scarim Coral:
Wait, how? I mean aren't the materials used in 3d printing are kinda soft since it has to be cut easily?

Either way, that's pretty impressive.

There are many, many different materials to print with. From soft and rubbery, to hard and brittle. There's even giant printers that print buildings with concrete. More to the point though, there are very strong materials to be used in 3D printing. Strong enough to be used as actual armor.

It'll win it. Batman always wins! I am loooving this technology.

This is cool and this sucks at the same time.

Those impressive get ups that we are used to from all those cons? The planning, the material selection, the craft?

It's all going to boil down to who has the money to spend on 3d printing.

Cool costume contests have now been boiled down to pay-to-win.

ObsidianJones:
This is cool and this sucks at the same time.

Those impressive get ups that we are used to from all those cons? The planning, the material selection, the craft?

It's all going to boil down to who has the money to spend on 3d printing.

Cool costume contests have now been boiled down to pay-to-win.

You know that there are already people that just pay others to craft their costumes for them anyway, right? Not much of a difference.

ObsidianJones:
This is cool and this sucks at the same time.

Those impressive get ups that we are used to from all those cons? The planning, the material selection, the craft?

It's all going to boil down to who has the money to spend on 3d printing.

Cool costume contests have now been boiled down to pay-to-win.

Costumes don't magically pop out when you throw money at a printer. There is a lot of skill and design to put into 3D printing if you want something good to come out of it. And if you mean you can just hire someone to make something for you; that's been around since a few thousand years before cosplaying was a thing. And it's not like traditional crafts simply go away because of 3D printing. Hell, for some projects, traditional crafts is plain better.

Besides people have been buying costumes for years, just depends on the requirements of entry for the contest.

My takeaway from this is that at some point in time, the term "3-D printing" has come to mean both that (a machine creating an object by layering a material, generally in filament form, together), and the CMC cutting process, whereby a machine takes material, and carves the design out of that material. It's a difference of additive and reductive construction, and it bothers me. Not having access to the production information for this, I'm inclined to believe it was constructed using the latter method, as the suit is clearly lacking in the trademark "threads stacked on each other" look that's ubiquitous with the former.

Scarim Coral:
Wait, how? I mean aren't the materials used in 3d printing are kinda soft since it has to be cut easily?

Either way, that's pretty impressive.

Your use of the word "cut" implies you're looking at the second method I've outlined, rather than the first, and to that end I can say, they can pretty much do whatever.


Plus, keep in mind that diamond cutting is generally done by machine these days, so the durability of a material really isn't an obstacle.

OT: Of course, this ALL may be invalidated by one thing:

It's Impressive but It's not nearly as accurate as I would have hoped. the Logo is slighty off, the most outer portion of the wings on the logo are supposed to be curved and there is supposed to be a cure between the bat ears on the logo. The Armor Platting doesn't match the armor platting on any version of the costume used in a comic book, video game, or movie. The bulky plating in the gauntlets and the shin armor are the most immediately identifiable inaccuracies, and I don't know where he got the design for that belt.

Banjo-Kazooie Blue:
It's Impressive but It's not nearly as accurate as I would have hoped. the Logo is slighty off, the most outer portion of the wings on the logo are supposed to be curved and there is supposed to be a cure between the bat ears on the logo. The Armor Platting doesn't match the armor platting on any version of the costume used in a comic book, video game, or movie. The bulky plating in the gauntlets and the shin armor are the most immediately identifiable inaccuracies, and I don't know where he got the design for that belt.

Holy nitpick, Batman!

OT: Good lord do I wish I had this suit. I'd never take it off and I'd do ALL the charity events to make little kids squee at the sight of the best freakin Batman out there.

ObsidianJones:
It's all going to boil down to who has the money to spend on 3d printing.

Which is very much in the spirit of Batman, when you think about it.

Hur hur hur, working four barreled fireball shooter? Cuz why not?

 

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