Triceratops Family Welcomes New Member Named After Legendary Dino Hunter

Triceratops Family Welcomes New Member Named After Legendary Dino Hunter

A newly detailed relative of Triceratops has been discovered in Alberta, Canada. The horned dinosaur is to be named Wendiceratops, after legendary fossil hunter Wendy Sloboda.

The iconic Triceratops welcomed a new addition to its family of horned dinosaurs today with the official unveiling of Wendiceratops Pinhornensis, named for prolific Canadian fossil hunter Wendy Sloboda.

More dinosaur discoveries.

The find, which included three adults and one juvenile skeleton, was made in southern Alberta, Canada, near the border of Montana. Over two hundred bones were collected in the area known as the Oldman Formation.

Though Sloboda did not discover these fossils herself, she is credited with discovering the Oldman Formation.

Were dinosaurs warm-blooded or cold-blooded?

Wendiceratops, like its famous cousin, head three prominent facial horns, and was a low-set, quadrupedal herbivore and herd animal. The physical differences between the two species are easy to spot, however. At 6 metres in length, "Wendy" was just two-thirds the size of the larger Triceratops. Says study co-author David Evans, "The wide frill of Wendiceratops is ringed by numerous curled horns, the nose had a large, upright horn, and it's likely there were horns over the eyes, too. Its front-most horn was blunted, rather than long and dangerous, and thus was probably not used for fighting and defense.

Check out the gallery below to see some of the bones collected in the dig:

About Sloboda, Evans had this to say: "Wendy... has a sixth sense for discovering important fossils. She is easily one of the very best dinosaur hunters in the world."

This is not the first extinct animal Sloboda has had named after herself; that would be meat-eating bird Barrosopus Slobodai.

Who needs to genetically engineer new dinosaurs, when cool ones keep popping up all the time?

Source: PLOS ONE, Telegraph

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And here I was thinking that it was named Turok.
Disappointed.

fenrizz:
And here I was thinking that it was named Turok.
Disappointed.

Me too.

I mean, come on....you say "Legendary Dino Hunter" on a site like this and I'd be shocked to find someone who doesn't think of Turok.

a slight nitpick of the drawing, wouldn't it have some kind of feathering to be living in a cold region like that. I understand people don't really accept the idea of dinosaur herbivores having feathers but it lived in Canada and a Triceratops was found with some kind of feathering recently too. also Triceratops is not the name of the family, that would be Ceratopsidae

tf2godz:
a slight nitpick of the drawing, wouldn't it have some kind of feathering to be living in a cold region like that. I understand people don't really accept the idea of dinosaur herbivores having feathers but it lived in Canada and a Triceratops was found with some kind of feathering recently too.

No, there's no evidence of any dinosaur outside of Theropoda having actual feathers. There is some evidence of basic filament structures in other groups, including Ceratopsia. However, these would be much more likely to be similar to hairs on elephants or bristles on pigs than actual feathers. There is speculation that evidence of such filaments in many different species suggests that the precursors to feathers originated quite early on in dinosaurs rather than being a late evolution soon before avian dinosaurs arose, but it would be rather wide of the mark to suggest this means that all dinosaurs had feathers. The vast majority would have had scales or something more like bristles or fur, only a few would have had anything approaching actual feathers.

tf2godz:
a slight nitpick of the drawing, wouldn't it have some kind of feathering to be living in a cold region like that. I understand people don't really accept the idea of dinosaur herbivores having feathers but it lived in Canada and a Triceratops was found with some kind of feathering recently too. also Triceratops is not the name of the family, that would be Ceratopsidae

To Go with what Kahani said, the world was much different then, the area that would of been Canada might of been much further south. Meaning it wouldn't of been as cold. So no need for feathers :P

I'd rather just call it Triceratops 2 than say something so bloody retarded.

Thought this was going to be a Taco article from the title.

Yeah...you might wanna think about editing that headline, as I'd imagine many - including myself - will immediately think this:

fenrizz:
And here I was thinking that it was named Turok.
Disappointed.

Happyninja42:
Thought this was going to be a Taco article from the title.

I didn't. Mind you I saw it on the local news last night as it was. And the reason why she is referred to as a legendary dino hunter is because she has an almost uncanny knack for spotting fossils that most others miss.

Vigormortis:
I mean, come on....you say "Legendary Dino Hunter" on a site like this and I'd be shocked to find someone who doesn't think of Turok.

That's a good point, but let me counter with: EVERY dinosaur hunter, to my mind, is a legendary dino hunter.

For example, a dinner party: "Oh, what do you do for a living?" "I'm a dinosaur hunter." "THE LEGENDS ARE TRUE!"

fenrizz:
And here I was thinking that it was named Turok.
Disappointed.

Think about it this way, maybe someday we will have a Turokasaurus Rex.

arc1991:

tf2godz:
a slight nitpick of the drawing, wouldn't it have some kind of feathering to be living in a cold region like that. I understand people don't really accept the idea of dinosaur herbivores having feathers but it lived in Canada and a Triceratops was found with some kind of feathering recently too. also Triceratops is not the name of the family, that would be Ceratopsidae

To Go with what Kahani said, the world was much different then, the area that would of been Canada might of been much further south. Meaning it wouldn't of been as cold. So no need for feathers :P

I don't think there's been much tectonic shift since the Cretaceous, but that part of Alberta is really hot and arid even today. If it's the cold you're worried about, a surprising amount of Canada is very warm through most of the year, especially in the western provinces where the Rocky Mountains and Pacific coast influence the weather.

(I didn't know there was evidence of fuzz on ceratopsids, that's super cool!)

Kahani:
/

arc1991:
/

Sable Gear:

arc1991:

tf2godz:
a slight nitpick of the drawing, wouldn't it have some kind of feathering to be living in a cold region like that. I understand people don't really accept the idea of dinosaur herbivores having feathers but it lived in Canada and a Triceratops was found with some kind of feathering recently too. also Triceratops is not the name of the family, that would be Ceratopsidae

To Go with what Kahani said, the world was much different then, the area that would of been Canada might of been much further south. Meaning it wouldn't of been as cold. So no need for feathers :P

I don't think there's been much tectonic shift since the Cretaceous, but that part of Alberta is really hot and arid even today. If it's the cold you're worried about, a surprising amount of Canada is very warm through most of the year, especially in the western provinces where the Rocky Mountains and Pacific coast influence the weather.

(I didn't know there was evidence of fuzz on ceratopsids, that's super cool!)

here's a pic of one

a Triceratops was found with some kind of quills/feathers/fuzz on its

There is also been findings of a fuzzy Ornithischia recently to http://www.theguardian.com/science/lost-worlds/2014/jul/24/kulindadromeus-feathers-dinosaur-birds-evolution-siberia-russia this discovery have made many scientists wonder how many dinosaurs had proto-feathers on them.

But yeah I jumped the gun on saying all herbivores have feathers (I should've said they may have had proto-feathers or got fuzz) but it looks like something that seems very common of the ceratopsids at least from the recent discoveries.

 

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