Just the Moon, Stopping By For an Epic Photobomb

Just the Moon, Stopping By For an Epic Photobomb

An unintentional benefit of NASA's DSCOVR satellite has been the amazing photos of Earth it has taken, but this time the moon wanted some attention, too.

Ground squirrels. Carnivorous seals. Creepy, staring children. And now a new contender for the photobomb to end all photobombs: the moon. O hai there!

NASA's DSCOVR satellite has already returned some epic views of our home planet in its scant few weeks since first activating. Looks like the moon didn't like its big sibling getting all the attention.

The photo is actually more than just peculiar - it literally sheds light on something many humans have never seen before: the dark side of the moon. Most Apollo mission astronauts have seen it before landing, and the USSR took a photo before that, but to most of us back here on Earth the moon is not showing its familiar face.

Our moon is tidally locked, which means its spin is in (almost) perfect sync with its orbit. We only ever get to see one side of the satellite when we look up at night.

The far side of celestial objects can tell us a lot.

You weren't missing much, according to some astronauts. "The back side looks like a sand pile my kids have played in for some time. It's all beat up, no definition, just a lot of bumps and holes," said Apollo 8's William Anders.

He's probably right. I'd rather get a close-up of the space peanut.

Source: CNN, NASA

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Crazy that that photo looks kinda fake, even though it's real! :O

Kenjitsuka:
Crazy that that photo looks kinda fake, even though it's real! :O

Well, as you know, NASA and the like enhance photos taken in space in order to make it more viewable. There's bound to be a bit of that problem, sometimes.

Aw shit! We were photobombed by a mooning! Glob dammit!

But seriously, the moon's timing is impeccable...

My first thought was how the hell did they get that shot when satellites are in orbits lower than 36,000km.

But it's at a lagrange point (were the space colony's in Gundam are) and we very rarely use them so this is different.

Just checked and according to Wikipedia this is the 10th satellite to be put in orbit at a lagrange point since the first in 1978.

PatrickJS:

all beat up, no definition, just a lot of bumps and holes

Sounds like the lyrics to a particularly awful rap song.

Moon pops in, Moon pops out. YOU can't explain that!

P-89 Scorpion:
My first thought was how the hell did they get that shot when satellites are in orbits lower than 36,000km.

But it's at a lagrange point (were the space colony's in Gundam are) and we very rarely use them so this is different.

Just checked and according to Wikipedia this is the 10th satellite to be put in orbit at a lagrange point since the first in 1978.

Yeah, I was wondering about that until I looked it up, myself. I just had to explain why we typically don't have full photos of the Earth to a flat earther, and here we are.

Adam Jensen:
Moon pops in, Moon pops out. YOU can't explain that!

*Dave Silverman face*

The moon mooned us.

Sonofabitch

Zachary Amaranth:

P-89 Scorpion:
My first thought was how the hell did they get that shot when satellites are in orbits lower than 36,000km.

But it's at a lagrange point (were the space colony's in Gundam are) and we very rarely use them so this is different.

Just checked and according to Wikipedia this is the 10th satellite to be put in orbit at a lagrange point since the first in 1978.

Yeah, I was wondering about that until I looked it up, myself. I just had to explain why we typically don't have full photos of the Earth to a flat earther, and here we are.

Adam Jensen:
Moon pops in, Moon pops out. YOU can't explain that!

*Dave Silverman face*

It's where we keep most of the big space telescopes.
It helps if the pesky earth and moon are not in the way half the time.

direkiller:

It's where we keep most of the big space telescopes.
It helps if the pesky earth and moon are not in the way half the time.

I'm aware. I just wasn't aware *this* one was shot from there.

Zachary Amaranth:
I just had to explain why we typically don't have full photos of the Earth to a flat earther, and here we are.

Oof. I don't envy that experience

You know how looking at the grey shapes of the moon you always try to make out the shapes?

... Yeah, well... Personally I think the backside of the moon looks like a giant 5 or 6 Star Dragon Ball.

If a Dragon Ball was that big, I wonder how long we'll have to wait for our next wish? Another 12,000 years?

 

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