HBO Picks Up Sesame Street For Five Seasons

HBO Picks Up Sesame Street For Five Seasons

Sesame Street

For the next five seasons, Elmo, Big Bird, and the Sesame Street gang will air on HBO before its home network PBS.

Game of Thrones, The Sopranos, Sesame Street, and Boardwalk Empire. At first glance, it seems like one of these things is not like the others, but they have something in common: Airing on HBO. The non-profit children's television group Sesame Workshop recently formed a partnership with the premium cable channel, allowing the next five seasons of Sesame Street to first air on cable and HBO's streaming outlets. Perhaps that "Game of Chairs" educational parody wasn't as outrageous as we'd first thought.

Sure, at first glance this might sound like a strange partnership. Sesame Street is a long-running children's television show which delivers educational content through beloved Muppets, while HBO has a reputation for packing nudity and adult content in its original programming. But all things considered, the deal is fantastic for Sesame Street, which historically received 10 percent of funding through its home network PBS. Everything else comes from licensing revenue and DVD sales, which hasn't fared so well in our era of Netflix binge-watching.

Under HBO, Sesame Street can significantly ramp up its production, creating 35 episodes per year instead of the standard 18. The partnership even allows for a spinoff series starring Sesame Street Muppets and a second unannounced educational series. Financial details of the partnership weren't disclosed, but I imagine it provides Sesame Street with a lot more freedom in its regular programming.

"The partnership is really a great thing for kids," chief executive of Sesame Workshop Jeffrey D. Dunn explained. "We're getting revenues we otherwise would not have gotten, and with this we can do even more content for kids."

Of course, HBO benefits from the partnership as well. Sesame Street will air first on HBO and HBO streaming services nine months before returning to PBS. It also gives the premium cable channel a huge edge in on-demand family content. Amazon, Netflix, and other companies are investing heavily in original children's programming right now, but none are likely to have the brand recognition Big Bird, Elmo, and the rest of Sesame Street embody.

"We were instantly thrilled for the opportunity to bring an iconic series like 'Sesame Street' to HBO," chief executive of HBO Richard Plepler said. "Sesame Street stands for excellence and quality in children's programming, and we stand for excellence and quality in all programming. If we are going to lean into that and start to do more, we want to associate ourselves with a brand that is consummate to ourselves."

Source: New York Times

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It's good that it's being kept on PBS.

daughter: "it's time for sesame street!" turns on HBO 5 minutes before it starts and see's sex scene, father: turns pale.

This piece of news was brought to you by the letters O, M and G.

Are Burt and Ernie getting a new late-night edition packed full of the gay stuff?

Their still making Sesame Street? Also why HBO? That seems.......risky.

SinisterDeath:
Are Burt and Ernie getting a new late-night edition packed full of the gay stuff?

Well, obviously. I'm looking forward to the episode where Oscar sucks Big Birds dick in a back alley so he can feed his cocaine addiction.

It's time for today's Word on the Street? What is the Word on the Street?

"Sexposition."

What's a sexposition?

"It's when you reveal story relevant information during a sex scene."

Neat! Stay tuned and see if you can find any sexposition today on Sesame Street!

Everyone's coming up with clever Sesame Street jokes, but I'm just remembering Mr. Hooper and feeling sad.

OT: This doesn't sit well with me. A child may not notice a 9 month delay, but a parent will, and I don't like the idea of something designed to educate the public being put behind a paywall. The speech that Mr. Rogers made to American Congress comes to mind.

It probably says something that the show that was once the flagship of PBS, whose merchandise was once the cause of Black Friday riots, now can't afford to make as many episodes per season as My Little Pony without help. And keep in mind, less than half of the content of any given episode is brand new, since they're still recycling sketches that were around when I was a kid.

Actually, not to sound crass, but do they really need to make more than 18 new episodes a year? Even if they're restricted to episodes made after the Great Restructuring, that should still be plenty of backlog to keep kids occupied until they're old enough to not be watching Sesame Street anymore. That's why so many kids' shows drop down into single digits or even just go into permanent reruns after the first few seasons; you're only going to hold on to that audience for so long.

Starting with the next season this fall, they're also cutting back from 60 minute to 30 minute episodes. Though if they keep with the current 30 minute structure they have for the afternoon episodes, I'll be happy. No Elmo's World/Elmo the Musical and Abby's Flying Fairy School.

Today's episode was brought to you by the letter "Unrelenting Nudity"!
and the number "motherfucker"

cant wait.

The same "No mom, its not porn. Its HBO!" HBO?

Hooray for diversifying the lineup.

So I take it we're going to be visiting a lot more brothels in the near future.

As long as it's being kept at PBS too, GOOD ON THAT SHIT.

Can't wait for the Felt Wedding.

Thunderous Cacophony:
Everyone's coming up with clever Sesame Street jokes, but I'm just remembering Mr. Hooper and feeling sad.

OT: This doesn't sit well with me. A child may not notice a 9 month delay, but a parent will, and I don't like the idea of something designed to educate the public being put behind a paywall. The speech that Mr. Rogers made to American Congress comes to mind.

Once the first nine month delay passes that should be it with the delay, or will that happen at the start of every season?

The Enquirer:
Once the first nine month delay passes that should be it with the delay, or will that happen at the start of every season?

Good question. When I first read it I thought it meant that every season would be delayed on PBS nine months, but looking at the article it's possible it meant only the first season. It could go either way.

Fox12:

Well, obviously. I'm looking forward to the episode where Oscar sucks Big Birds dick in a back alley so he can feed his cocaine addiction.

I always figured Oscar would be a heroin addict. You know who's on the coke? Snuffleupagus!

This is one of those weird deals where it looks like everyone wins. PBS viewers still get their shows and now even more while HBO has more family friendly content and Sesame Street gets to expand.

I'm not sure how to feel about business deals that work well for everyone. It's like seeing a unicorn except that these can actually exist sometimes.

Used to love this show as a kid

 

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