GameStop Wants to End Digital Bundles in Its Stores

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GameStop Wants to End Digital Bundles in Its Stores

GameStop Trade In

GameStop executives plan to bring more bundles with physical games to its stores in the future.

Bundles are, understandably, one of gamers' favorite ways of buying new hardware. Generally packaged with discounted software, they basically guarantee that you'll have something ready to play when you get your shiny new console home. With digital games becoming more and more prominent however, it's increasingly becoming the norm for bundles to come with download codes as opposed to a physical disc. If a recent conference call is any indicator however, this is a practice that some retailers intend to push back against.

GameStop executives, speaking in the aforementioned earnings call, have revealed the company's intention to alter the way it sells bundles. Addressing the issue, COO Tony Bartel stated that the recent trend toward "packed in" digital titles runs contrary to GameStop's "preference" that "we have physical discs." Bartel would go on to say that consumers can "anticipate that at GameStop you will see more physical bundles from third parties as opposed to digital bundles." CEO Paul Raines further commented that "consumers prefer those physical bundles" and cited the value a disc has for things like "the trade-in program at GameStop" as being one of the reasons why.

Speaking personally, I'm kind of inclined to agree. Don't get me wrong, it's obvious why GameStop's higher-ups want physical games to be the standard for their bundles. The company makes much more money off of its trade-in program than from almost anything else. Bundles packaged with digital titles, in turn, means that customers have fewer games they can trade-in to GameStop. It's just bad business for the company to promote them. Even if GameStop's interest is self-motivated though, gamers technically still do get more out of disc-based bundles, so who are we to complain if that's what the company wants to offer us. What do you guys think? Is this a silly move on GameStop's part or are you with them in their preference for physical titles?
Source: The Street

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I think it's the dying throes of a company designed to thrive in a bygone era. The only discs I own for any game I play are all for my consoles, and I don't have an eighth of the number of physical game copies for them as I do digital game copies at places like Steam and GOG or bought direct from the company itself. What do you even GET from a physical copy, anyway? A box that takes up space? A manual that offers you nothing you couldn't learn online or in the game itself? A disc that can get scratched or bent, rendering your game unplayable?

Bah, I say.

Kajin:
I think it's the dying throes of a company designed to thrive in a bygone era. The only discs I own for any game I play are all for my consoles, and I don't have an eighth of the number of physical game copies for them as I do digital game copies at places like Steam and GOG or bought direct from the company itself. What do you even GET from a physical copy, anyway? A box that takes up space? A manual that offers you nothing you couldn't learn online or in the game itself? A disc that can get scratched or bent, rendering your game unplayable?

Bah, I say.

you do realize that the pc gaming market while large is by far dwarfed by consoles right? (don't worry your pc is by far more powerful:)

OT: yeah good idea from them and they'll end up better off for it.

OH NOES!, digital games don't come in physical copies!, we REALLY need that trade in money!

ecoho:
you do realize that the pc gaming market while large is by far dwarfed by consoles right? (don't worry your pc is by far more powerful:)

Without knowing exact numbers, I'd be willing to call bullshit on that. Everyone I know that has a console possesses, at most, maybe a dozen physical game copies. When I still used my PS3, I had more digitally downloaded copies of games than I did physical copies and the console market now is even more attuned to digital distribution than it's ever been. With the rise of independent developers that don't even bother to sell physical copies of games (predominantly for PC, but the current console generation is dabbling in that as well), I'd be willing to bet digitally distributed games outnumber physical copies of games at least two to one. If you told me they outnumbered physical copies by twenty to one, I'd believe that without doubt.

The market is shifting quickly and devastatingly away from a physical one to a digital one, and the trend will continue for years to come. It won't stop. It'll never stop. Physical media is just too cumbersome and annoying. GameStop and its ilk are a dying breed. They won't be around much longer unless they change their business practices.

ecoho:

you do realize that the pc gaming market while large is by far dwarfed by consoles right? (don't worry your pc is by far more powerful:)

OT: yeah good idea from them and they'll end up better off for it.

Not actually:
https://www.superdataresearch.com/blog/global-games-market-2015/
http://www.ign.com/articles/2015/05/27/console-pc-gaming-market-estimated-to-earn-more-than-mobile-in-2015
http://www.forbes.com/sites/jasonevangelho/2014/04/28/as-global-pc-game-revenue-surpasses-consoles-how-long-should-console-makers-keep-fighting/
http://hexus.net/gaming/news/industry/83972-pc-games-sales-eclipse-value-console-games-sales-2016/

The PC gaming market isnt just slightly bigger than both Sony and MS consoles together, it also earns more money than the mobile market.

On the one hand I find it extremely distasteful exactly WHY they want to make this change.

On the other hand...I'm actually all for this mentality of having actual games come with the console, not download codes (one of the things that irritated me a bit about my vita was the fact it only came with download codes.. I vastly prefer having a physical copy of the game to a digital one. I rarely buy a digital version of something if I can get a boxed copy unless it is dramatically cheaper (generally steam sales in that regard).

While we can all agree GameStop isn't doing this to be a shining paragon of justice or anything, I do find myself agree with the idea of physical copies. For one thing, downloading a game to a console takes up a LOT of space. If I had to download every single game that I own for my consoles, I would not have enough room I believe.

But, more important to me, I like having the physical disc. I like owning the game, and the feeling that comes when I hold it in my hand. I get a sense of pride when I look at all my Final Fantasy games, or Suikoden games, just lined up on the shelves. It's a sense of, "Yeah, these are mine. I own these," that comes from being a collector I think.

It's the same thing with preferring an actual book to an ebook I think.

Kajin:

ecoho:
you do realize that the pc gaming market while large is by far dwarfed by consoles right? (don't worry your pc is by far more powerful:)

Without knowing exact numbers, I'd be willing to call bullshit on that. Everyone I know that has a console possesses, at most, maybe a dozen physical game copies. When I still used my PS3, I had more digitally downloaded copies of games than I did physical copies and the console market now is even more attuned to digital distribution than it's ever been. With the rise of independent developers that don't even bother to sell physical copies of games (predominantly for PC, but the current console generation is dabbling in that as well), I'd be willing to bet digitally distributed games outnumber physical copies of games at least two to one. If you told me they outnumbered physical copies by twenty to one, I'd believe that without doubt.

The market is shifting quickly and devastatingly away from a physical one to a digital one, and the trend will continue for years to come. It won't stop. It'll never stop. Physical media is just too cumbersome and annoying. GameStop and its ilk are a dying breed. They won't be around much longer unless they change their business practices.

It's more about the Retro side of it. Retro game collecting is a HUGE market at the moment and it's only considered to be on the console side of gaming. Retro collecting physical PC games is not huge at all. People want original copies of games they can trade and sell at market values and that is never changing. This push to end physical games is all bullshit and I would like for people to have options. Digital music downloads did not kill CD's and vinyl of all things made a come back.

Personally, and I know I'm in the minority on this, but I prefer physical copies of my games because I enjoy lending and trading them with friends. GameStop is a company that is slowly finding itself on the losing side of this battle, however, and in ten years time we won't be seeing them any more. And they know it. That's why if you walk into any GameStop nowadays you'll see that they take trade-ins on phones, tablets, and other things. Hell, they even absorbed Cricket and ThinkGeek in order to keep more physical merchandise in their stores.

I much prefer places like BlockBuster and GameStop stay open, but I know that's not the direction things are headed if growing trends are anything to go off of. I mean, this is a generation of console gaming where people are more willing to buy digital because the THOUGHT of getting up and having to change out their disc perturbs them.

AgentCooper:
-snip-

Gonna be honest. Not really sure what you're getting at. Retro gaming has nothing at all to do with the future of gaming. I doubt physical media will ever truly go away, but as the years go on it'll eventually shrink to only a fraction of what digital media will eventually become. Especially now with the rise of independent game developers overshadowing AAA publishers. I don't think I've EVER seen an indie game that was being sold on a disc. Minecraft was, but that was only after it went on to become so profitable that it could no longer be thought of as indie at all.

Kajin:

AgentCooper:
-snip-

Gonna be honest. Not really sure what you're getting at. Retro gaming has nothing at all to do with the future of gaming. I doubt physical media will ever truly go away, but as the years go on it'll eventually shrink to only a fraction of what digital media will eventually become. Especially now with the rise of independent game developers overshadowing AAA publishers. I don't think I've EVER seen an indie game that was being sold on a disc. Minecraft was, but that was only after it went on to become so profitable that it could no longer be thought of as indie at all.

Point was people will always want some kind of physical copy of something. Quite a few indie games are getting physical release now. Shovel Knight was announced some time ago with a soundtrack and the Ducktales remaster had a physical release. It does depend on who backs these things ultimately. These examples don't reflect a changing trend or anything. Its just that the collectors market is still huge deal to people. I think Physical Vs. Digital has a interesting balance to it. I just would like to see more choices honestly.

I apologize If I sounded hostile to you in any way.

Kajin:
I think it's the dying throes of a company designed to thrive in a bygone era. The only discs I own for any game I play are all for my consoles, and I don't have an eighth of the number of physical game copies for them as I do digital game copies at places like Steam and GOG or bought direct from the company itself. What do you even GET from a physical copy, anyway? A box that takes up space? A manual that offers you nothing you couldn't learn online or in the game itself? A disc that can get scratched or bent, rendering your game unplayable?

Bah, I say.

I do agree that GameStop doesn't have much time left, but I wouldn't say it's a bygone era... yet. There's still a large chunk of people that don't have internet speeds to make digital gaming more convenient vs buying a disc. What you get from a physical copy is VALUE from the ability to resell your game when you're done. Reselling games (not to GameStop, duh) makes console gaming rather cheap for me, I don't have to wait for sales or price drops for a game to cost me say $20, I can buy the game day 1 and end up spending $20 or less on the game. I don't buy games digitally on PSN unless the games are under $20 because it really makes no sense for me to do that. Also digital prices should be cheaper than physical copies because publishers WANT me to buy digital so I can't resell thereby allowing them to make more money on more copies sold; I'll scratch your back if you scratch mine. Not to mention there's just lower costs with selling digital vs making all the discs and cases and shipping them all over the world.

I understand why they want to do this...still doesn't change the fact that digital is the way of the future imo. I made the switch to pure digital this generation and it's so much better for me, since trade-ins were done out of a necessity when I didn't have a job. Now that I have a regular income I don't want to trade in any of my precious games!

As much as I don't really care for physical copies and going to Gamestop depresses me to no end, Digital still needs a competitor until the European Union can force the likes of Steam to offer trade ins and license selling.

As somebody who lives in Australia and is still held back by the wonderful thing known as a 'data cap', this is nice. I can't do too many digital games despite my Steam Library being huge. I have a PS4, and not only does that have limited hard drive space, downloading games for that would chew through said data like no tomorrow.

Yeah, physical copies and brick and mortar stores are dying, everyone sees that. But I like having a physical box I can put on a shelf, show people and lend. I also miss manuals that had things in them.

Eyes of Avo:
I understand why they want to do this...still doesn't change the fact that digital is the way of the future imo.

I'm sure it is. Doesn't mean I have to like the idea of a publisher monopoly and games which can be taken away with the flick of a switch.

+1 for GS as far as I'm concerned. The longer the horrifying shitty all digital future is pushed back the better, and if GameStop can help in some small way good on them.

Ugh, I hate finding download codes in bundles. It is a dirty tactic to shave some pennies off the cost to produce a unit, with the simultaneous bonus of locking the game to one account. There are people who can't feasibly download games, making researching how the games are packaged in bundles a necessity for those people. It also blows when someone buys a system with barely any storage to hold the game and gave extra space for more. *cough* the fuckin' Wii U *cough* They won't even preload the games on the systems, negating the need for internet.

If they can get console manufacturers to stop being too cheap to put a super-inexpensive CD[1] in their bundles, Gamestop will get some legit brownie points from me (not near enough to make me a regular customer, though). Although, I doubt GS has the power anymore to force the console makers to stop bundling download codes with systems. GS might as well just match the digital bundles as best as they can with deals of their own involving physical copies and new/used systems. I think they've already done something like that before.

I think I'm in an enemy mine situation with Gamestop. I don't like trading games in with them, but I do like having physical copies of games.

[1] I think modern handheld cartridges are cheaper than the old generations of carts, too.

I like this. I've had times when I've bought a digital game in a box (thinking it was an actual CD), got home to play it and had to download it overnight as it took hours to download. A physical copy gives quicker access to the game (minus the day 1 updates/DLC)

I've been a proponent of "Disc In Hand" since the very beginning. I use digital due to not being given much of an option. Even when you buy a physical PC game, it's oftentimes just a link to STEAM or something on the disc where you need to download it anyway as opposed to being a working copy on the disc you can use without all the nonsense. Or such has been my experience.

I prefer digital, because I'm sick of dealing with physical discs and cartridges. Swapping discs to play different games was the spawn of satan, and it made me despise physical discs altogether. I still get annoyed when I have to swap discs in my PS3. Fuck. That. Shit.

Bobular:
I like this. I've had times when I've bought a digital game in a box (thinking it was an actual CD), got home to play it and had to download it overnight as it took hours to download. A physical copy gives quicker access to the game (minus the day 1 updates/DLC)

I have done something like that with the A Link Between Worlds 3DS XL bundle back during Black Friday 2013. I looked at the box to find the digital copy was a download coupon. Before I fought my way through the mob to get the last box on the shelf, I wouldn't have figured that Nintendo would do that.

The game took about an hour to download, when a game of the same size on Steam takes me about 1-2 minutes. In 2013, Nintendo's only North American distribution server must've been an old Pentium 3 buried in their office broom closet.

Therumancer:
I've been a proponent of "Disc In Hand" since the very beginning. I use digital due to not being given much of an option. Even when you buy a physical PC game, it's oftentimes just a link to STEAM or something on the disc where you need to download it anyway as opposed to being a working copy on the disc you can use without all the nonsense. Or such has been my experience.

I don't even get why publisher's bother with the effort to put a retail PC disc on the shelves, only for it to contain the Steam installer and a redemption code for the game. The only legitimate reason I can think of is they can get the discs pressed and ready to ship before the game code is even finalized, but any competent company can properly plan the logistics of a physical release without resorting to shortcuts.

At least the full game on disc can help keep data caps down, even if you have to link the copy to Steam/Origin/Uplay.

That's good news to me! I've never bought a digital game and have no intention to do so. The day that gaming goes all digital is the day that it leaves me behind.

Good move, obviously Gamestop are just doing it for the trade money but honestly this shit has started getting on my nerves.

It isn't just consoles anymore, it's actual collector's editions of the games themselves.

In Australia, at least, it's become pretty standard for pretty much every game that comes bundled with a Microsoft console to be a digital download code, sometimes they have 1 physical copy of a game; but what really irks me is stuff like the upcoming Halo, you pay a premium to get the Halo limited edition console and inside is a limited edition steelbook case for a disc that only has a download code in it...

But what really has to take the cake is the ridiculously priced Halo 5 collector's edition, $330 in Australia, and in the box you get, and I quote, a Uniquely-designed Spartan themed SteelBook with a fucking download code in it... $330 and they can't even throw a fucking disc in to the fucking special case they fucking made to a hold a fucking disc.

I'm not sure why everyone wants to go digital all of a sudden. Is it really that much of a pain to swap one disc into the tray for another, really? It's not like you have to call in a helicopter to land, wait for it to land, leave your house to then walk to the helicopter, get in the helicopter, take the disc from the pilot, store it in your inventory, then get out of the helicopter, go back into the house, head to your console, open your disc tray, take the current disc in the disc tray and put it into your inventory, select the disc from your inventory to put into the disc tray, then close the disc tray, and hit play, all the while a loading screen takes up half the time to do that from opening the inventory and exiting/entering the house.

Seriously though, I feel the advantage of having a physical disc is what consoles are really about. Digital is fine for PC, as most PC games tend to require obligatory internet connection for one reason or another, and waiting an hour or two to a day or so to download entire games unless you've got an internet speed that's some bajillion Megabytes per second or such isn't so bad on a PC cause you can do other things on the computer while it's downloading. With a console though, you can't really play other console games while it's downloading as(at least with the 360) it would stop or halt the downloading process. I don't want to buy a game, then wait an hour watching T.V. to play that game. If I buy that game on a console, I want to play it then and there, and that should never not be available.

However, as I am one for compromises, I would be ok with buying the game and having both a physical copy, and then the option to digitally download it should the physical copy get ruined.

I'm very much in the camp of "I know they are doing it for mostly selfish reasons, but I don't really care because it helps my reasons as well."

I honestly don't enjoy digital downloads. If the option exists for physical vs digital, I pick physical all the time. The last thing I need is something happening to the device/server/whatever that causes me to lose my games. If I lose my games, I want it to be a result of my own negligence or stupidity. At least I can control that.

AS Umbra said, i know WHY they do it, but it also helps me.

If i buy a video game for my console, i don't want to download it, i want to stick it in the tray and play immediately. For a Pc game, while i got a decent speed for the web, I still have to wait and it kills my excitement.

Steam is a viable platform for game releases because its so damn cheap, and while you can't trade in games or stuff like that, I do put in very dedicated research into what I am buying beforehand and the possibility of enjoying it with friends weighs in heavily as well, especially during a sale.

A business that depends on the dead physical delivery method tries to push for said method. i wonder how long will it keep trying to beat that dead horse.

ecoho:

you do realize that the pc gaming market while large is by far dwarfed by consoles right? (don't worry your pc is by far more powerful:)

OT: yeah good idea from them and they'll end up better off for it.

Only one facet of PC gaming - Steam - has more active members than all consoles put together. Consoles are and always were dwarfed by PC gamers. Its just that PC has far more games and thus the audience is far more divided.

AgentCooper:

It's more about the Retro side of it. Retro game collecting is a HUGE market at the moment and it's only considered to be on the console side of gaming. Retro collecting physical PC games is not huge at all. People want original copies of games they can trade and sell at market values and that is never changing. This push to end physical games is all bullshit and I would like for people to have options. Digital music downloads did not kill CD's and vinyl of all things made a come back.

thats because there is no need to collect physical games on PC, since PC games wont stop working in a few years when MS or Sony decides to stop supporting servers. Heck, even when Ubisoft shut down its DRM servers the games reliant on them still worked. PC gamers can download collection of retro games bigger than most collectors in less than an hour. there is no reason to collect them seperately.

Except that CDs are pretty much dead and the only place vinyl made a comeback is in the heads of hipsters. Its all about streaming, like Spotify and dogital downloads like iTunes and BandCamp now. only the dinosaurs still print CDs.

Hairless Mammoth:
There are people who can't feasibly download games, making researching how the games are packaged in bundles a necessity for those people.

maybe those people should finally start blaming those who are responsible for this instead of trying to blame everyone else?

> Microsoft creates one of the best digital games markets for its Xbox One launch which even allowed digital game reselling and very extensive game sharing, something even Steam didn't and still doesn't currently offer
> online only games though so Microsoft gets crucified
> Microsoft backpedals a lot and makes the console offline friendly
> they have to remove the brilliant online system
> skip forward two years
> everything beginning to go more and more digital
> "Oh, if only there was some way to resell my digital games and give them to friends and family to play like they were physical games!"

image

Strazdas:
A business that depends on the dead physical delivery method tries to push for said method. i wonder how long will it keep trying to beat that dead horse.

ecoho:

you do realize that the pc gaming market while large is by far dwarfed by consoles right? (don't worry your pc is by far more powerful:)

OT: yeah good idea from them and they'll end up better off for it.

Only one facet of PC gaming - Steam - has more active members than all consoles put together. Consoles are and always were dwarfed by PC gamers. Its just that PC has far more games and thus the audience is far more divided.

AgentCooper:

It's more about the Retro side of it. Retro game collecting is a HUGE market at the moment and it's only considered to be on the console side of gaming. Retro collecting physical PC games is not huge at all. People want original copies of games they can trade and sell at market values and that is never changing. This push to end physical games is all bullshit and I would like for people to have options. Digital music downloads did not kill CD's and vinyl of all things made a come back.

thats because there is no need to collect physical games on PC, since PC games wont stop working in a few years when MS or Sony decides to stop supporting servers. Heck, even when Ubisoft shut down its DRM servers the games reliant on them still worked. PC gamers can download collection of retro games bigger than most collectors in less than an hour. there is no reason to collect them seperately.

Except that CDs are pretty much dead and the only place vinyl made a comeback is in the heads of hipsters. Its all about streaming, like Spotify and dogital downloads like iTunes and BandCamp now. only the dinosaurs still print CDs.

Hairless Mammoth:
There are people who can't feasibly download games, making researching how the games are packaged in bundles a necessity for those people.

maybe those people should finally start blaming those who are responsible for this instead of trying to blame everyone else?

No excuse I said PC gaming retro collecting for physical is dead. Nothing I said invalidates that. Retro is different on consoles than on PC. Sure you can download tons of classic games and that just defeats the fun of retro game hunting. Some PC games from the 1990's had extravagant editions with cds and even art books. If you collect physical then you would want these.

No, cds are not dead and make up quite of bit of revenue. I can go buy new cd's for the price of a full album on itunes. I have sales charts from 2010-2015 and digital sales are down along with physical. People want streaming music. Which is a awful alternative for anything. Considering how shady streaming licenses can be.

Listen... I'm done debating. I'm not here to convince you otherwise and I don't feel like doing the endless quote chaining.

AgentCooper:

No excuse I said PC gaming retro collecting for physical is dead. Nothing I said invalidates that. Retro is different on consoles than on PC. Sure you can download tons of classic games and that just defeats the fun of retro game hunting. Some PC games from the 1990's had extravagant editions with cds and even art books. If you collect physical then you would want these.

No, cds are not dead and make up quite of bit of revenue. I can go buy new cd's for the price of a full album on itunes. I have sales charts from 2010-2015 and digital sales are down along with physical. People want streaming music. Which is a awful alternative for anything. Considering how shady streaming licenses can be.

Listen... I'm done debating. I'm not here to convince you otherwise and I don't feel like doing the endless quote chaining.

Yes, retro game for physical is dead, but its dead because there is no need for it and not because its somehow inferior. we just have better methods of collecting games, in digital form. and like i said its not like you have defined machines with PC. i can play Retrun Fire from 1993 on my PC i built last year but could i play Sonic 1 on PS4?

As far as the items such as atbooks go, there is actually a ninche group of people that shares these digitally as well. as in, scanned. of course legality of that is a gray area. dont know how exactly they do it since i was never into these things. i always bought games for games and not for complimentary items.

CDs are dead. Their revenue is small. Digital download totally dominates sales revenue, not to mention that majority of revenue for musicians now are tours rather than sales of songs (because often one can listen to them for free on youtube and the like, so much less people buy them nowadays)

Yes, like i said, streaming is king now. I agree that streaming is pretty bad considering how licensing works now and myself always go for digital download instead, but the trend to digital streaming is there.

Arnoxthe1:
> Microsoft creates one of the best digital games markets for its Xbox One launch which even allowed digital game reselling and very extensive game sharing, something even Steam didn't and still doesn't currently offer
> online only games though so Microsoft gets crucified
> Microsoft backpedals a lot and makes the console offline friendly
> they have to remove the brilliant online system
> skip forward two years
> everything beginning to go more and more digital
> "Oh, if only there was some way to resell my digital games and give them to friends and family to play like they were physical games!"

Or, you know, microsoft could have done this like steam did and allow family sharing without always online bullshit.....

Also this is the first time i hear about digital games reselling from microsoft. yes, their online idea system was something interesting but i never heard about this aspect of it.

Arnoxthe1:
> Microsoft creates one of the best digital games markets for its Xbox One launch which even allowed digital game reselling and very extensive game sharing, something even Steam didn't and still doesn't currently offer
> online only games though so Microsoft gets crucified
> Microsoft backpedals a lot and makes the console offline friendly
> they have to remove the brilliant online system
> skip forward two years
> everything beginning to go more and more digital
> "Oh, if only there was some way to resell my digital games and give them to friends and family to play like they were physical games!"

image

I thought the reason the X-Box One was crucified before launch was because of the daily DRM like checks they were trying to implement. I'm all for digital but I still want physical collector's editions.

For everyone that has crappy internet I see a solution for it. Stores like GameStop, Wal-Mart, Meijer, etc can sell pre-downloaded games on flash drives. If someone wants to buy a digital download they just bring in a flash drive and can have the game downloaded onto it at GameStop or other stores that have great internet.

Bat Vader:
I thought the reason the X-Box One was crucified before launch was because of the daily DRM like checks they were trying to implement. I'm all for digital but I still want physical collector's editions.

Well, you could still use the console but you wouldn't be able to play games with it until you had a working connection. But the way the entire digital system would work, if they allowed you to play offline, the system would be able to be crazy exploited for free games. So there was a good reason behind the always-online decision. One of the big problems though is, Microsoft did such a bad job of marketing the system's positives, thus dooming any chance the digital system had of taking off. All people saw was online-only and none the massive benefits that Microsoft had planned for it. So, people obviously pretty much rioted against it. XD

Having said all that though, we just simply aren't in a time where you can find an internet connection anywhere anyway. And until that happens, I agree that we should still stick to physical copies.

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