Netflix Now Knows The Exact Episode of a TV Show That Got You Hooked

Netflix Now Knows The Exact Episode of a TV Show That Got You Hooked

breaking bad

New data released by the streaming service gives "Netflix and chill" a much more literal meaning than we've previously been led to believe.

I remember the exact moment I became a Breaking Bad fan for life -- Season 1: Episode 2, right after Jesse Pinkman made the decision to dissolve a body in his upstairs bathtub rather than a plastic barrel as Walter White had ordered him to do. The results were quite humorous.

Apparently I wasn't the only one who was hooked on the series from (close to) the very beginning, as recent data released by Netflix argues that most of us who got into Breaking Bad through a good ol' fashioned binge-watching session fell for Vince Gilligan's particular brand of storytelling hook, line and sinker by, you guessed it, Season 1: Episode 2.

It's just one of the many insights Netflix has gathered from analyzing our watching habits over the years, be it with shows picked up by the streaming service after the fact or ones exclusively distributed by them. In the case of Netflix's Daredevil, most of us were hooked by episode five. For The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, it was episode four. For network shows like Mad Men and How I Met Your Mother, it took a little while longer, but the end result was always the same ("Netflix and chill," I believe is the technical term).

Why conduct this research? To prove that presenting a show commercial-free leads to increased binge-watching, and that releasing entire seasons of a program at once is a superior method of content delivery. According to the report, "It turns out that when commercial breaks and appointment viewing are stripped away and consumers can watch an entire season as they choose, you can see fandom emerge. That is, 70% of viewers who watched the hooked episode went on to complete season one or more poetically, when members were hooked and there was no turning back."

"Given the precious nature of primetime slots on traditional TV, a series pilot is arguably the most important point in the life of the show," said Ted Sarandos, Chief Content Officer for Netflix. "However, in our research of more than 20 shows across 16 markets, we found that no one was ever hooked on the pilot. This gives us confidence that giving our members all episodes at once is more aligned with how fans are made."

But what exactly defines a "hooked" episode? Well...

The data in this research was pulled from accounts who started watching season one of the selected series between January 2015 - July 2015 in Brazil, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, UK and US and between April 2015 - July 2015 for Australia and New Zealand. A hooked episode was defined when 70% of viewers who watched that episode went on to complete season one. Hooked episodes were first identified by country, then averaged to create the global hooked episode. The hooked episode had no correlation to total viewership numbers or attrition.

It's getting easier and easier to understand why Netflix is abandoning the majority of their movie catalogue in favor of a TV-centric approach to streaming. Check out the infographic Netflix released below, then let us know what episodes of your favorite shows "hooked" you in the comments section.

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That sounds less to me like I'm hooked at that point and more that's when everyone else dropped the show.

Something Amyss:
That sounds less to me like I'm hooked at that point and more that's when everyone else dropped the show.

That sounds about right. I mean, DareDevil got 4 million people to watch it in its entirety in its first two weeks, and on the weekend it came out 4 of my friends came over to my place specifically to spend an afternoon/early morning binge watching the whole thing in two sittings (only stopping for dinner and between episode bathroom brakes). Does this mean we got 'hooked' on the promotional material? Episode 1?

*Some salty comment on how obscenely bad Game of Thrones seasons 5 is*

Ugh... as for these... I need try one of these one day, I guess.

Wait, what? How does one finish season one 'poetically'?
Or do they mean that once you watched that episode you finished the rest of the season in one sitting?
Or that, people watching up until just before that episode didn't finish the season at all?

uh. their methodology sounds like the opposite of knowing when you got hooked. it merely counts the episode when all people that didnt like it stoppped watching and only fans were left. so basically its probably the worst episode of season 1 that made people leave.

Also considering that i always give a show at least 1 season to grown on me that would be episode 1 for me for every single show ive ever watched. which is absolutely false.

I'm glad I'm not the only person who noticed that this doesn't give you the episode in which people got hooked so much as it does the episode in which most people stopped watching.

...I guess it does depend a little bit on how early the "hooked" episode shows up. A show that hooked a bunch of people from episode 2 must have had a pretty good first or second episode that "hooked" the people who watched it. While a show that had a "hooked" episode of 10 probably just had a pretty bad episode 9, driving away its former viewers.

Charcharo:
*Some salty comment on how obscenely bad Game of Thrones seasons 5 is*

Ugh... as for these... I need try one of these one day, I guess.

wait..aren't you the one who didn't know what netflix was up until like 3 weeks ago?

if not, my apologies.

OT: as many have pointed out, I think they are reaching the wrong conclusion here with the "data", but still neat to look at nonetheless.

I will say I do agree that releasing a whole season at a time is much more likely to get me to watch it (whenever a tv show releases one episode a week, I just wait until a week or so before the finale and binge on all the episodes online somewhere, I hate watching one episode weekly.)

Yes... Just because you have statistics, doesn't mean you actually know what they mean...

Typical.

gmaverick019:

Charcharo:
*Some salty comment on how obscenely bad Game of Thrones seasons 5 is*

Ugh... as for these... I need try one of these one day, I guess.

wait..aren't you the one who didn't know what netflix was up until like 3 weeks ago?

if not, my apologies.

OT: as many have pointed out, I think they are reaching the wrong conclusion here with the "data", but still neat to look at nonetheless.

I will say I do agree that releasing a whole season at a time is much more likely to get me to watch it (whenever a tv show releases one episode a week, I just wait until a week or so before the finale and binge on all the episodes online somewhere, I hate watching one episode weekly.)

I am. There is no Netflix in my country, and even if it was here, it would DIE.

But I do have HBO...

*Had
Fuck Season 5

Charcharo:

gmaverick019:

Charcharo:
*Some salty comment on how obscenely bad Game of Thrones seasons 5 is*

Ugh... as for these... I need try one of these one day, I guess.

wait..aren't you the one who didn't know what netflix was up until like 3 weeks ago?

if not, my apologies.

OT: as many have pointed out, I think they are reaching the wrong conclusion here with the "data", but still neat to look at nonetheless.

I will say I do agree that releasing a whole season at a time is much more likely to get me to watch it (whenever a tv show releases one episode a week, I just wait until a week or so before the finale and binge on all the episodes online somewhere, I hate watching one episode weekly.)

I am. There is no Netflix in my country, and even if it was here, it would DIE.

But I do have HBO...

*Had
Fuck Season 5

Curious, why would it "die"? do people in your country not have good internet (such as, have low data caps?) or do they not care for tv shows and movies as much?

Something Amyss:
That sounds less to me like I'm hooked at that point and more that's when everyone else dropped the show.

This was exactly my thought as well. They cannot say with any certainty when a show "hooks" someone, despite this stupid statement:

"Given the precious nature of primetime slots on traditional TV, a series pilot is arguably the most important point in the life of the show," said Ted Sarandos, Chief Content Officer for Netflix. "However, in our research of more than 20 shows across 16 markets, we found that no one was ever hooked on the pilot. This gives us confidence that giving our members all episodes at once is more aligned with how fans are made."

If I see the first episode of a show and like it so much that I finish it, then likely it was the first episode that hooked me, or at least one of the earliest episodes. All their statistics show is when the last largest number of viewers give up on the show.

gmaverick019:

Charcharo:

gmaverick019:

wait..aren't you the one who didn't know what netflix was up until like 3 weeks ago?

if not, my apologies.

OT: as many have pointed out, I think they are reaching the wrong conclusion here with the "data", but still neat to look at nonetheless.

I will say I do agree that releasing a whole season at a time is much more likely to get me to watch it (whenever a tv show releases one episode a week, I just wait until a week or so before the finale and binge on all the episodes online somewhere, I hate watching one episode weekly.)

I am. There is no Netflix in my country, and even if it was here, it would DIE.

But I do have HBO...

*Had
Fuck Season 5

Curious, why would it "die"? do people in your country not have good internet (such as, have low data caps?) or do they not care for tv shows and movies as much?

We have the second best OR the best internet in the world... WITHOUT caps. At all.

*Reason is piracy aimed at TV shows...
They cant survive this.

Umm... I think it has less to do with the commercials and more the regularity of released content. I used to watch shows regularly every week. Then fall and winter sweeps occurred and I was okay with having a couple of weeks after where there were reruns.

However, now it seems that I get three new episodes, then two repeats, two new episodes, two repeats, four new episodes and so on. I get tired of sitting down every week only to be served another repeat. Now I just wait till the season is over and download them or buy the DVD/Blurays and watch it all at once.

This is what Netflix focuses on. I like Once Upon a Time. Season 4 is coming on September 27 on Netflix. I may not be up to date with it but when it arrives, I'll be able to watch it knowing I'm not wasting time preparing for a repeat.

Not sure how they can put Better Call Saul stats when it's not available on Netflix

CrystalShadow:
Yes... Just because you have statistics, doesn't mean you actually know what they mean...

Typical.

Well, these numbers clearly point to something, so...significance!

*blows bubbles out of pipe*

COMaestro:

If I see the first episode of a show and like it so much that I finish it, then likely it was the first episode that hooked me, or at least one of the earliest episodes. All their statistics show is when the last largest number of viewers give up on the show.

I don't know how often the first episode hooks me. I gave several of these shows in question a shot, and I'm not sure any of them got me from episode one. Not even Daredevil, which is the show on that list that I like the most. Well, excluding those I haven't seen. I mean, I really like Daredevil, but I'm not sure if I would have been all that worried if I'd been unable to finish more than one episode.

When I saw the headline, I thought maybe this tracked frequency of viewing, because that might tell you something. Like, say I watched Episode 1 one week, Episode 2 another week, and Episode 3 a third. Then, after 4, I started watching nightly. Or even finished the series that night. Now, that might not automatically tell you you're hooked (maybe school got out, you were on vacation, or you were sick-- I watched 2 seasons of Sabrina the Teenage Witch on Hulu over 3 days when I was too ill to move), but it would be a better indicator of your "hooked" level than this, I'd think.

FoolKiller:
Umm... I think it has less to do with the commercials and more the regularity of released content. I used to watch shows regularly every week. Then fall and winter sweeps occurred and I was okay with having a couple of weeks after where there were reruns.

However, now it seems that I get three new episodes, then two repeats, two new episodes, two repeats, four new episodes and so on. I get tired of sitting down every week only to be served another repeat. Now I just wait till the season is over and download them or buy the DVD/Blurays and watch it all at once.

This is what Netflix focuses on. I like Once Upon a Time. Season 4 is coming on September 27 on Netflix. I may not be up to date with it but when it arrives, I'll be able to watch it knowing I'm not wasting time preparing for a repeat.

I think there are a lot of factors. I'll throw in price. I stopped paying for cable because there were like four shows I watched and I was paying like a hundred bucks a month. Even if I bought a season of a TV series a month, I would be paying less--often significantly. With Netflix and Hulu, I don't even have to do that. I can pay a monthly fee for shows I might not want to purchase, and still have a bunch of others I can try out. The latter part may lead to me purchasing DVDs, too. And future DVDs if the series is ongoing.

But cable TV has attempted to keep us locked into a dated format that doesn't benefit us as consumers for a long time pasts its prime. Worse, there are ways to split the difference, but like the music industry before them, cable would rather fight a losing battle. I mean, they're adapting slowly, but I think the damage is done.

yourbeliefs:
Not sure how they can put Better Call Saul stats when it's not available on Netflix

The Netflix website says it is. It's listed as available to watch now.

Hm, I had kind of the opposite results between Daredevil and Breaking Bad.
I was hooked into Breaking Bad after the birth of Heisenberg, you know, "This is not meth, Tuco." *KABOOM*
And the hallway fight scene was what really got me in Daredevil, bolstered a little bit by Episode 1' "Mattie, get to work" fight in the rain.

No, Netflix... You don't know when I got hooked on a particular show because, honestly, it's always by the first, fucking episode!

Other than that, if they could guess which scene in the first episode that "hooked" me, then I would retract my "Checkmate"...

 

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