Science Breaks Another Distance Record For Quantum Teleportation

Science Breaks Another Distance Record For Quantum Teleportation

Researchers from NIST have "teleported" quantum information across 100 km of optical fibre - breaking a record in the process.

When a scientist uses the word "Quantum" while describing a new breakthrough, it usually signals that a science-fiction future is getting closer to reality. Take quantum teleportion - which has nothing to do with Star Trek teleports, sadly - but is still pretty important for the future of the internet. The process refers to exactly transmitting quantum information - encoded within qubits - from one location to another without losing any data. This is much harder than it sounds, but a team from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) just broke a quantum teleportation record by transmitting data across 102 km of fiber cable.

First, let's take a quick crash course on how quantum teleportation works. Traditionally, the binary two-state system -all those 1's and 0's running behind computer programs - is the easiest way to transmit information. Quantum information theory deals with qubits instead, which can represent a 1 and 0 at the same time.

So far so good - but actually transmitting qubits without losing the information is a colossal pain. Albert Einstein himself never believed it could be done, and even last year science could send it about ten feet. NIST's breeakthrough is a huge leap forward by comparison.

NIST has published a handy graphical breakdown of the process for anyone who feels quantum mechanics goes right over their head. According to NIST's Marty Stevens, the record was only possible thanks to advanced single-photon detectors created by the organization. "Only about 1 percent of photons make it all the way through 100 km of fiber," Stevens explained. "We never could have done this experiment without these new detectors, which can measure this incredibly weak signal."

At the moment, we can achieve quantum teleportation over greater distances in free space - the current record there is 143 km. But if quantum information can be transmitted across conventional wiring, we have a wider range of options when designing quantum networks - especially when it comes to security encryption. Regardless, developments like these are strongly worth following in the coming years.

Source: Nanotechnology Now

Quantum Teleportation

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My brain hurts. I'm starting to understand how much older people feel. Here's this technology that I would either have to spend a decade learning about or simply grow up with it in order to understand it.

I'll try to keep up, but damn if it isn't hard to keep up.

WouldYouKindly:
My brain hurts. I'm starting to understand how much older people feel. Here's this technology that I would either have to spend a decade learning about or simply grow up with it in order to understand it.

I'll try to keep up, but damn if it isn't hard to keep up.

Here's what I do. If something says quantum, read it as magic. It makes everything so much simpler.

WouldYouKindly:
My brain hurts. I'm starting to understand how much older people feel. Here's this technology that I would either have to spend a decade learning about or simply grow up with it in order to understand it.

I'll try to keep up, but damn if it isn't hard to keep up.

MiskWisk:

WouldYouKindly:
My brain hurts. I'm starting to understand how much older people feel. Here's this technology that I would either have to spend a decade learning about or simply grow up with it in order to understand it.

I'll try to keep up, but damn if it isn't hard to keep up.

Here's what I do. If something says quantum, read it as magic. It makes everything so much simpler.

Essentially, this is a process of moving a higher order of computation information from Point A to Point B, more complex information faster with no loss of data. Not a literal teleportation, but a transmission nonetheless. Essentially, with a breakthrough like this, "How high is up?" just got alot higher in terms of computer information transmission.

That's neat, and all, but I'm waiting on the Quantum Leap.

So it seems like using the word "teleportation" here is a massive misnomer, there is not teleportation involved whatsoever. It's just moving very quickly.

So if you've "teleported" the evil twin of the input photon, does it have a tiny goatee?

Seriously, though, I've got no idea what any of this means aside from 'we can transmit more information farther now'.

Seems like the one of 2 states of arrival are used to individually represent the 1's and 0's of the information being transmitted.

It helps to understand that all they have to do is make the particles arrive in either the "1" state or the "0" state. It's just a messy way of getting it there that just happens to have a lot of benefits to efficiency and speed.

It also seems like this is something that's going to take forever to get working practically. XD

Rebel_Raven:
That's neat, and all, but I'm waiting on the Quantum Leap.

Oh boy!

The Rogue Wolf:
So if you've "teleported" the evil twin of the input photon, does it have a tiny goatee?

Unless observed, all subatomic particles have and don't have a goatee simultaneously.

Seriously, though, I've got no idea what any of this means aside from 'we can transmit more information farther now'.

My understanding of it is that that's basically what it means. Or rather, "we can transmit more data at a faster rate with the furthest distance we have yet managed."

It's worth noting that a 75% error rate is ridiculously high and there are other methods to make quantum teleportation 100% successful as long as the entanglement can hold, which is the hard part of this experiment in practice.

To put it as simply as I can think of right now: The first measurement has four possible outcomes with equal probability. Based on the outcome measured, the sender sends two classical bits to the receiver. From these two bits, the receiver knows what the outcome is. Now they just apply an appropriate operation to their qubit to get the state that was being sent.

I'm guessing NIST here just wanted a proof of concept over this kind of distance before doing anything more advanced.

 

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