The Name of the Wind to Become a Movie, TV Show, And Game, All At Once

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The Name of the Wind to Become a Movie, TV Show, And Game, All At Once

The rights to Patrick Rothfuss' Kingkiller Chronicles book series has been won by Lionsgate. The books will become a movie, television series, and video game - all at the same time.

Lionsgate and Patrick Rothfuss have worked out a complex rights deal concerning the latter's hugely popular fantasy novels, The Kingkiller Chronicles. The multiplatform proposal will see a film, television series, and video game all developed simultaneously, and negotiations have apparently been going on for several months.

Pat seems pretty pleased: "Honestly, I've never been very interested in a straight-up movie deal. But Lionsgate was willing to work out something different, a multiplatform deal where they develop the films, TV series, and games simultaneously. That will give us the screen time to develop the characters and show off the world."

"What's more, through this whole process, they've treated me with amazing respect. I never thought a studio would approach me as a creative partner who understands how stories work."

Kingkiller Chronicles follows the adventures of Kvothe, as he recounts to a biographer how he went from being a travelling performer to one of the most notorious, reviled, and beloved wizards the world had ever seen - and ended up tending bar at an out-of-the-way inn. He masters magic, loves women, plays music, crosses swords, finds treasure and loses it. He gets beaten up a lot, but not half as much as he probably deserves. As far as modern fantasy literature goes, most estimates place it second in popularity only to George R.R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire.

Board games have already been developed based on those the characters play in The Name of the Wind and The Wise Man's Fear. There's no telling what parts of the story a video game would follow, or what might be left out for a film or TV show. How will they portray his music, among other things? My sincere hope is they take a page out of Scott Pilgrim's adaptation and have real-world artists fill in. Imagine Kvothe standing on stage gently strumming his lute, his rapt audience weeping; meanwhile, movie-goers are treated to the Stones' Gimme Shelter. Rothfuss: call me.

Source: Hollywood Reporter

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Oh my, here goes extra pressure to finish the trilogy. :7

He even looks like the bastard child of Georgie R.R. and a burly wizard.
Oh well I guess fantasy epics written by burly begrudging beards are all in at the moment. I'm sure the video-game will be a critical success.

Edit: upon closer inspection, his face portrays an expression of sly pleasure...what dastardly villianous activities happen to be occurring off camera, may I ask?

Xsjadoblayde:
He even looks like the bastard child of Georgie R.R. and John C. Reilly.

Fixed that for you.

The premise for this sounds pretty intriguing. Can anyone here recommend these books? I love ASOIAF and haven't been able to find a series that really lives up to it. Like I tried Wheel of Time but it's just so arduously slow and I don't care about any of the characters except Perrin.

Kontarek:

Xsjadoblayde:
He even looks like the bastard child of Georgie R.R. and John C. Reilly.

Fixed that for you.

The premise for this sounds pretty intriguing. Can anyone here recommend these books? I love ASOIAF and haven't been able to find a series that really lives up to it. Like I tried Wheel of Time but it's just so arduously slow and I don't care about any of the characters except Perrin.

I'm going to be the voice of dissent here.

I've read both of the Kvothe books, and I hate the character. He's a knob. He's your typical super-special know-it-all who can play an instrument, has incredible knowledge retention, impresses everyone, and is just amazing. Rothfuss makes a big deal about how he's incapable with women but he STILL hankers after a gorgeous lass and gets halfway there (who is a main character in the stories, not sure how it'll play out yet).

In terms of their readability - Rothfuss's books seem wooden. As if the author wanted to write fantasy, and forced himself to.
EDIT: I've read ASOIAF and that is good fun. Don't read the Kvothe books unless you have to.

CrimsonBlack:

Kontarek:

Xsjadoblayde:
He even looks like the bastard child of Georgie R.R. and John C. Reilly.

Fixed that for you.

The premise for this sounds pretty intriguing. Can anyone here recommend these books? I love ASOIAF and haven't been able to find a series that really lives up to it. Like I tried Wheel of Time but it's just so arduously slow and I don't care about any of the characters except Perrin.

I'm going to be the voice of dissent here.

I've read both of the Kvothe books, and I hate the character. He's a knob. He's your typical super-special know-it-all who can play an instrument, has incredible knowledge retention, impresses everyone, and is just amazing. Rothfuss makes a big deal about how he's incapable with women but he STILL hankers after a gorgeous lass and gets halfway there (who is a main character in the stories, not sure how it'll play out yet).

In terms of their readability - Rothfuss's books seem wooden. As if the author wanted to write fantasy, and forced himself to.
EDIT: I've read ASOIAF and that is good fun. Don't read the Kvothe books unless you have to.

Quoted for truth, the first book was ok, but the second was a constant circlejerk festival about how fucking amazing Kovthe is. That a setting that seemed to be done with came back in full force certainly didn´t help my opinion and there is no way in hell that can be a trilogy seeing how little has actually been shown and achieved on the first two books.

Kontarek:
The premise for this sounds pretty intriguing. Can anyone here recommend these books? I love ASOIAF and haven't been able to find a series that really lives up to it. Like I tried Wheel of Time but it's just so arduously slow and I don't care about any of the characters except Perrin.

I'm a huge fan of the series, especially the first book. Its style is highly poetic - both in terms of flowery language, and rhythm of speech. It's an extremely well thought out world, but kept vague in the way a first-person narrator should - he even makes currency exciting, and the hero goes through such highs and lows of poverty and largesse that you're rooting for him when he finds a penny. The best thing in the books are the stories that characters tell. Each culture, nation, and person has their own view of history or myth, and there are kernels of truth in each fairy tale you hear. If you've ever read Watership Down, I'd compare the tales in Kingkiller to Dandelion's stories of El-Arairah

It's filled with hundreds of, for lack of a better term, Easter eggs - little factoids about the world or the characters that are of no meaning to the story, and difficult to truly discern, but are very rewarding when you see the pieces come together (Spoilers: I'm thinking of the poem that Kvothe is reprimanded for saying in the first book, is related to a character in the second; the way that two certain peoples' names are so alike they must be connected, but no one seems to notice or care; etc, etc). You can read from cover to cover and never notice if you don't want to, but a deeper reading gives you gifts. "Holy crap! So he knew about X from the very beginning!" or "Wait - he told a story in a which a woman with that name went to this city and - gasp!"

I was really put off from reading it because I'd heard all the things people are saying about it - it's one super-awesome-amazing guy's journey, written by a basement-dwellin troll who doesn't understand dating and yet his character is the best sexer in history. I got over all that pretty quickly. Not only is it ok for characters like that to exist, and for you to like him - imagine what Theseus' autobiography might look like - but Kvothe is ultimately a sympathetic character. His older self, telling the story, is a bitter, defeated man, revelling in how great he used to be, knowing it all came crashing down probably especially thanks to his own arrogance.

Anyways. I really like it!

Thanks for the replies guys.

The fact that you're told from the beginning that this character ultimately ends up as a broken old man might be enough for me to tolerate his general dickery throughout the story. I'll give the first book like a hundred pages or so and see if I'm still interested.

Hmm, might have to check it out. Still waiting on the Mistborn movie and videogame, though.

This is great news!
Now I hope they do not fuck up like the idiots that made GoT Season 5.

Best news now would be a Witcher TV series based only on the books... and maybe Abbercrombie getting a sweet deal.

Loved the first book, it was really fun in a Harry Potter meets Game of Thrones sort of way.. But the second was terrible in my opinion.

I'll read the third, just for completeness sake, I reckon.

Name of the Wind would be horrible as a movie, unless it's some kind of side story. The primary strength of the series is how steeped in mythology the setting is, and the many different form of the same myths. That's hard to do all of in a single film.

I only hope he learned from what happened to Robert Jordan and put some safe guards for himself into the contract.

CrimsonBlack:

EDIT: I've read ASOIAF and that is good fun. Don't read the Kvothe books unless you have to.

Wow... I've never heard, seen, felt, smelt or even tasted anything but glowing reviews for The Kingkiller Chronicle. In the circles I run in, Rothfuss is nothing short of a literary genius with the fantasy genre. You can see proof of his skill in how quickly his popularity rose following the publishing of Name of the Wind. The guy skyrocketed out of nowhere and now shares panels with the best despite having only published 2 books, a novella and a short story. I honestly don't know how to react to someone *not* liking his work.

Anyway, I can't recommend Kingkiller Chronicle enough. Read the blurb on the back of Name of the Wind and if that doesn't describe a character you want to see moving through the world, then maybe it's not for you. The books outright tell you everything that will happen to the protagonist, both how amazing he will be and how sad and miserable he'll become despite it, and then makes you want to read the story anyway.

/Just my 2 cents.
//I love his beard.
///I love his voice more ^^

The books are enjoyable to read. The main characters may be this super-amazing-know-it-all but it's a fun story to read through anyway. And it's not like he's perfect either. I noticed throughout the books just how much of an idiot the main character is when it comes to money. He's constantly poor and as soon he gets some money he immediatly spends it on something he doesn't need, which in turn lets him continue his glorious tradition of being constantly in trouble because he's poor.

If you can deal with a Mary "I swear I'm not a Mary Sue" Sue character then the books are really fun to read. It's your typical fantasy world trip, but with amazing attention to detail and a grounded mix of realism and mythology.

noobiemcfoob:

Wow... I've never heard, seen, felt, smelt or even tasted anything but glowing reviews for The Kingkiller Chronicle. In the circles I run in, Rothfuss is nothing short of a literary genius with the fantasy genre. You can see proof of his skill in how quickly his popularity rose following the publishing of Name of the Wind. The guy skyrocketed out of nowhere and now shares panels with the best despite having only published 2 books, a novella and a short story. I honestly don't know how to react to someone *not* liking his work.

Anyway, I can't recommend Kingkiller Chronicle enough. Read the blurb on the back of Name of the Wind and if that doesn't describe a character you want to see moving through the world, then maybe it's not for you. The books outright tell you everything that will happen to the protagonist, both how amazing he will be and how sad and miserable he'll become despite it, and then makes you want to read the story anyway.

/Just my 2 cents.
//I love his beard.
///I love his voice more ^^

I'm with CrimsonBlack on this one. The writing is perfectly good, the actual prose is great, but I did not find the books an interesting read. The main character's impossibly perfect set of skills and the absurd amount of love and affection he receives for them is frustrating enough to read through even before you have to put up with things like the tracking of every penny in the character's pocket. Honestly, it started to feel like I was reading a handbook on account for the lower classes at one point. Then there's the fact that the plot is lifted more or less complete out of A Wizard of Earthsea. I don't mind the copying, every Wizard-centric story of the last 40 years has cribbed something from A Wizard of Earthsea, the problem is that he's taking three books to get to the point that actually makes the Earthsea story interesting. It's the fall, the hubris that causes it, and the lessons learned and redemption sought that make that story. Instead, Rothfuss has chosen to focus on the least interesting part of the story, the golden age, where by necessity nothing of interest can happen because we know what the story's big moment is going to be and the main character can't be allowed to learn or develop too much until that point has been reached.

I can attest to the beard and voice being awesome though.

Only read the first Kingkiller Chronicle novel, but it was enough to turn me off reading more. What I can remember most is that:

-The protagonist is a tool.

-Many of his teachers are tools, and we're expected to be happy when they're put in their place.

-Worldbuilding is minimal

-The side characters aren't much better.

-Did I mention that the main character is a tool?

I read it a few years ago, and it's amazing how much I DON'T remember bar how much I disliked the main character. I'll give it some credit in that it doesn't have any of the usual fantasy tropes (e.g. dragons exist, but they're kind of pathetic creatures), but I'm not sure if that's enough. A Song of Ice and Fire is still compelling by its lonesome even if it didn't subvert fantasy expectations.

Oh, and I'm glad someone's mentioned Mistborn. Only read the first installment so far, but it's a book I highly recomend.

Razhem:

Quoted for truth, the first book was ok, but the second was a constant circlejerk festival about how fucking amazing Kovthe is. That a setting that seemed to be done with came back in full force certainly didn´t help my opinion and there is no way in hell that can be a trilogy seeing how little has actually been shown and achieved on the first two books.

maybe the tv show will be his origin story, thats basically what the first two books were anyway, and the film will be the 3rd book, a fair bit is going to happen in that after all

it could work out well no need to spend half the film setting up all the stuff you need to know, have time to tell what needs to be told, then have the big epic spectacle that films deliver. of course it might all fall to crap and tumble down around their ears hard to say but will be an interesting ride never the less.

Ukomba:
I only hope he learned from what happened to Robert Jordan and put some safe guards for himself into the contract.

there has been something going on with WoT rights? i dont really keep up with that side of things with books. hope noting half formed gets pushed out of a door just out of spite.

Fantasy authors tend to have their perks. George R.R. Martin really likes food, Steven Erikson likes fat chicks, etc etc. With Rothfus while I overall really enjoyed it he seems to have some sort of anime harem thing going on.

Anyways I'm not sure what they could do for a movie but I love the news for a TV series. If I could be a Hollywood producer this would be my pick for a TV adaption. Some fantasy series would just isn't going to fit either format, primarily from being to expensive for a TV show or too long for a movie, but I'd say Name of the Wind fits in just right for a TV adaption.

Now my top pick for a movie? Give me Brandon Sanderson Mistborn trilogy please! Mistborn would be way to expensive for a TV show, but the books are short enough that you should be able to fit each one into a movie.

Hey, Lionsgate, that company I hate that makes bad movies, got the rights to a beloved (mostly) book series
Can't
Wait
What do you mean "sarcastic"
I can only be sincere

CrimsonBlack:
I'm going to be the voice of dissent here.

I've read both of the Kvothe books, and I hate the character. He's a knob. He's your typical super-special know-it-all who can play an instrument, has incredible knowledge retention, impresses everyone, and is just amazing. Rothfuss makes a big deal about how he's incapable with women but he STILL hankers after a gorgeous lass and gets halfway there (who is a main character in the stories, not sure how it'll play out yet).

In terms of their readability - Rothfuss's books seem wooden. As if the author wanted to write fantasy, and forced himself to.
EDIT: I've read ASOIAF and that is good fun. Don't read the Kvothe books unless you have to.

That's kind of the point of heroic fantasy books. They're always about the exceptional adventures of an exceptional individual. The Kingkiller Chronicles actually deconstructs this; we know from the very beginning that the whole thing comes crashing down at some point, probably because of something stupid that Kvothe did. His luck (and make no mistake, Kvothe is very, very lucky) will eventually run out, and he winds up a fugitive who has lost everything he has ever loved, cared about, and worked for in the space of about a decade. He's only 24 or so in the framing story.

That being said, lots of unnecessary sex is a huge turn-off for me, and the last third of the second book falls into that trap. I also don't feel like he places enough emphasis on Kvothe's flaws (the guy's far from perfect), but I'm very interested in seeing in how everything in Kvothe's world goes horribly, horribly wrong.

Still...I didn't care for ASOIAF because of the writing style, to be honest. George R.R. Martin's history as a screenwriter shows in his writing style, in that the books feel like a gigantic screenplay. Having loads and loads of characters and frequently jumping around makes it difficult to put names to characters.

I love the books and I really wanted to see a TV adaptation but with movies in the mix, I'm a little concerned. How exactly is this supposed to work? Are they going to rush through the story in the movie and then flesh out the in between stuff in the series? I doubt they'll make it a requirement to watch both in order to understand the story.
Wait and see, I guess. Good news anyway. If it sucks I'll just read the books again.

The game adaptation is actually fantastic news though. Seeing how he's a big fan of games like Planescape: Torment and is in fact writing one the characters in Tides of Numenara I expect he'll be more involved than it's usual for a game adaptation. I'd be really surprised if this isn't going to be an RPG. I'd say get Obsidian on that, but they're happy doing their own thing for the first time right now.

EH never read the books, that short description alone puts me off. Maybe I'm wrong but it sounds like yet another asshole protagonist who sleeps around a lot and I'm sick of that shit. I'm just glad it tends be obvious when you have one of those in the first chapter. Dose it also have a love triangle or worse? Are the books brilliant enough in other ways to make up for that?

DementedSheep:
EH never read the books, that short description alone puts me off. Maybe I'm wrong but it sounds like yet another asshole protagonist who sleeps around a lot and I'm sick of that shit. I'm just glad it tends be obvious when you have one of those in the first chapter. Dose it also have a love triangle or worse? Are the books brilliant enough in other ways to make up for that?

The first chapter isn't anything like that, it's actually very poetic and does a good job sucking you in. It's in the latter end of the 2nd book that Kvothe transforms from awkward virgin teenager to sex machine. Not that this is ever the focus or it ever gets smutty.

Kontarek:

The premise for this sounds pretty intriguing. Can anyone here recommend these books? I love ASOIAF and haven't been able to find a series that really lives up to it. Like I tried Wheel of Time but it's just so arduously slow and I don't care about any of the characters except Perrin.

It's told from a first person perspective so you shouldn't go in expecting all the politcal drama and scheming that ASOIAF has. It's a very different series. Out of all the authors I've read, Rothfuss probably has my favourite writing style. It's hard to describe, but for me, he could be writing about the most mundane things and it'll still be incredibly interesting.

The magic system of the world is really well thought out and goes into enough explanation so that you can actually understand how Kvothe pulls off some of his more impressive feats.

While the initial tone of the book is quite dark, I'd say it's actually a good deal brighter than ASOIAF. There's a lot of humor and Rothfuss doesn't usually linger on the more depressing events. The series also has a lot more mystery to it.

The Name of the Wind is probably one of my favourite books ever and I'd highly recommend giving it a shot. Especially since I too enjoy ASOIAF and also didn't really like The Wheel of Time series (though I stuck it out for 6 books before finally giving up).

Hawki:

-Worldbuilding is minimal

While I don't entirely agree with the "Main character is a tool" bit, I can understand that.

This part I've got to adamantly disagree with. I recently reread the series and it's got a plethora of details in it. In addition, it does something that I really like and haven't seem much of anywhere else. Just about every story and tale you get from the past is unreliable. Some facts are true, some are false, and you get a lot of stories that seem to be about the same thing, but tell it from different perspectives. Some even outright contradict each other.

If I had to say anything about the worldbuilding, it's that it's minimalist. It doesn't dish out lots to you, but it gives you a lot to infer off of. The second book digs a lot deeper into the worldbuilding though, so you left a little early to get the bulk of it.

DementedSheep:
EH never read the books, that short description alone puts me off. Maybe I'm wrong but it sounds like yet another asshole protagonist who sleeps around a lot and I'm sick of that shit. I'm just glad it tends be obvious when you have one of those in the first chapter. Dose it also have a love triangle or worse? Are the books brilliant enough in other ways to make up for that?

Just like the other guy said, there's none of that in the first book. Later in the second book it gets a little bit (or a lot of bit) mary-sue-ish, and he sleeps around a lot, but you get the impression that this is just him jumping too hard into a world that he just discovered, and it bites him in the ass, hard (Not literally).

There's a lot of good in the series. Like, a lot that's very good. The first book is pretty solid all around, and the second book has some of my highest and lowest points for the series. I'd say it's well worth reading. As I mentioned earlier, it's got some very interesting storytelling, it's got some funny moments, and it's got some interesting characters. It's got a very atypical romance, in a good way. And no love triangles.

Kontarek:

Xsjadoblayde:
He even looks like the bastard child of Georgie R.R. and John C. Reilly.

Fixed that for you.

The premise for this sounds pretty intriguing. Can anyone here recommend these books? I love ASOIAF and haven't been able to find a series that really lives up to it. Like I tried Wheel of Time but it's just so arduously slow and I don't care about any of the characters except Perrin.

If you loved ASOIAF and are looking for something comparable the best bet is probably Joe Abercrombie, starting with his first book The Blade Itself of the First Law trilogy.

Synopsis:

A little less epic in scope, but a very similar character POV style with no real good guys or bad guys.

Actually if you want a preview they started adapting it as a web comic a few years ago, though it's only partway through the first book and has long been on hiatus. Good way to get a primer for the series though: http://www.firstlawcomic.com/

rodneyy:

there has been something going on with WoT rights? i dont really keep up with that side of things with books. hope noting half formed gets pushed out of a door just out of spite.

Well the company holding the rights to an adaption of the series has done absolutly nothing with it. Earlier this year the right would have expired, but the company pushed out a horrible, horrible "first episode" of a tv series out a day before the rights would have expired and got to keep the rights. The "first episode" aired basically at midnight on an unknown channel, because they knew it was sh*t and just wanted noone to actually watch it. But it's on the internet now and WoT fans are not pleased.

You can read up on it here:
http://io9.com/the-real-story-about-that-wheel-of-time-pilot-that-aire-1684773094

Amaror:

rodneyy:

there has been something going on with WoT rights? i dont really keep up with that side of things with books. hope noting half formed gets pushed out of a door just out of spite.

Well the company holding the rights to an adaption of the series has done absolutly nothing with it. Earlier this year the right would have expired, but the company pushed out a horrible, horrible "first episode" of a tv series out a day before the rights would have expired and got to keep the rights. The "first episode" aired basically at midnight on an unknown channel, because they knew it was sh*t and just wanted noone to actually watch it. But it's on the internet now and WoT fans are not pleased.

You can read up on it here:
http://io9.com/the-real-story-about-that-wheel-of-time-pilot-that-aire-1684773094

thanks for the info.

thats all rather sad but guess thats what happens when you put a load of sociopaths and lawyers in charge of creative works of art.

Rothfuss is a joke, his prose are rather good but his story telling and characters are all lacking in both depth and personality. I know why he's having such a hard time finishing the books. It's because he has no idea how to deliver on all the promises he's given his fans.

I expect his tv show and movie to be sword of truth quality given the material any directors/script writers will have to work with.

Azahul:

noobiemcfoob:

Wow... I've never heard, seen, felt, smelt or even tasted anything but glowing reviews for The Kingkiller Chronicle. In the circles I run in, Rothfuss is nothing short of a literary genius with the fantasy genre. You can see proof of his skill in how quickly his popularity rose following the publishing of Name of the Wind. The guy skyrocketed out of nowhere and now shares panels with the best despite having only published 2 books, a novella and a short story. I honestly don't know how to react to someone *not* liking his work.

Anyway, I can't recommend Kingkiller Chronicle enough. Read the blurb on the back of Name of the Wind and if that doesn't describe a character you want to see moving through the world, then maybe it's not for you. The books outright tell you everything that will happen to the protagonist, both how amazing he will be and how sad and miserable he'll become despite it, and then makes you want to read the story anyway.

/Just my 2 cents.
//I love his beard.
///I love his voice more ^^

I can attest to the beard and voice being awesome though.

I agree with how annoying the accounting is. The amount of time Rothfuss dedicates to adding up the pennies is irritating.

Also, his beard may be awesome, but his voice is not. This is coming from a British person - he has the most bland American accent. When you said you love his voice, I went and looked up an interview on youtube... not impressed. Bring me a writer who sounds like Jeremy Irons, and I'll be impressed. :D

Hawki:

Oh, and I'm glad someone's mentioned Mistborn. Only read the first installment so far, but it's a book I highly recomend.

I second this and highly recommend you read the other two books in the trilogy. If you want good world building, Mistborn Trilogy has got it.

Verrik:

Hawki:

Oh, and I'm glad someone's mentioned Mistborn. Only read the first installment so far, but it's a book I highly recomend.

I second this and highly recommend you read the other two books in the trilogy. If you want good world building, Mistborn Trilogy has got it.

And Sanderson's big epic series The Stormlight Archives (book 1: The Way of Kings, book 2: Words of Radiance, book 3 due next year and 10 planned in total) is even better! Except for the sake of this discussion it's way to big to fit in a movie and would be way to expensive to produce for TV.

Right now Sanderson is my favourite fantasy author surpassing GRRM, the guys still young and just a machine at writing. Love the way he worked his way up, started with a good standalone novel Elantris, then moved on and really established himself with a modest sized trilogy in Mistborn, and after that now that he's a famous author he starts working on the big 10 book epic series he'd been planning from the start. Now there's no need to compromise with book 1, the Way of Kings is a full sized 1000+ page epic with top notch production value. It's the only series I go and buy the full hardcover copy of just for the great artwork.

Verrik:

Hawki:

Oh, and I'm glad someone's mentioned Mistborn. Only read the first installment so far, but it's a book I highly recomend.

I second this and highly recommend you read the other two books in the trilogy. If you want good world building, Mistborn Trilogy has got it.

I've bought the second book, just haven't got round to reading it yet. The last fantasy novel I read was First King of Shannara, which has not only put me off Terry Brooks, but the fantasy genre as a whole right now. Taken a detour with The Martian, but whether I plough into another fantasy novel so soon is another matter. That, and I'm actually reading the novelization of Pacific Rim.

Yes, you have a right to raise an eyebrow.

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