Sword Coast Legends Developer n-Space Shuts Down

Sword Coast Legends Developer n-Space Shuts Down

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The developer of the recent Dungeons & Dragons game Sword Coast Legends has closed down.

n-Space was started in 1994 by Erick S. Dyke, Dan O'Leary, and Sean Purcell, who met while all three worked at GE Aerospace. Over the years, they've ported Call of Duty games to DS, developed Marvel: Ultimate Alliance 2, and most recently made Sword Coast Legends.

Ben Leary was an artist at the studio, and he posted a long message on Twitter about the closure. In it, he praised the efforts made to keep the company open, and lamented the fact that they were unsuccessful. You can read the full text of the tweet embedded below.

While Sword Coast Legends may not have been a smash hit, it was still good enough to garner three and a half stars from then-Escapist Managing Editor John Keefer. Regardless of how you felt about it, it always sad when a studio, especially one with such a solid track record, is closed down.

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Three and a half stars is quite generous, it's got some serious design flaws. Like for example the fact that only the characters with the PC get xp, so some will inevitably fall behind in levels and become useless during the course of the game. And the simplified saving system, which means you only get one slot that is constantly overwritten by autosave. No going back to earlier save if you hit a glitch, which very nearly cost me at least 20 hours of progress. And that's before even getting into the the debate about the controversial "adaptation" of D&D rules and limited selection of races/classes.

All this is very disappointing, because I very much wanted it to succeed. So much so that I actually pre-purchased, against my better judgment. Which means they still owe me a campaign DLC. Now what are the chances of actually getting that now?

Oh well, them's the gambler's breaks.

Sorry to hear about the closing of a studio and job losses. The game to me was unimpressive, it opened early on with lots of fan fair for the ramp up to release but as I got a closer look at the game there were several issues that could not be ignored.

I really wanted to like the game but opted instead to hold off and wait until after release to see what the full game actually looks and plays like.

I admitedly barely played Sword Coast at all, but it's still somewhat on my to-play list. Like many others I was intrigued by what initially appeared to be a cross between Baldur's Gate and Neverwinter Nights, which is frankly something that I've always wanted but fear I'll never see. The game's relative failure might very well be the last nail in the coffin of the sadly underdeveloped concept of a computer D&D toolbox.

The game's pre-order came with a statuette. Statistically, no game that has come with something like that has ever been good, or done well.

Personally i cant find a fuck to give.

I mean, this is a studio that spent most of its time producing ports and movie tie-in shovelware, while its own original IPs lie either forgotten or ill-remembered.

Nobody going to mention Geist?

It's the most interesting game they ever made, it was cool even if it hasn't aged well I still enjoyed it a lot RIP nSPACE.

gigastar:
Personally i cant find a fuck to give.

I mean, this is a studio that spent most of its time producing ports and movie tie-in shovelware, while its own original IPs lie either forgotten or ill-remembered.

Don't know if I agree, I respect them quite a lot, much like Sillicon Knights after making a cool cult-classic game with Nintendo they started having financial trouble so they survived by making mostly pretty decent ports of other games until they finally had enough to work in a game they actually wanted to make (Sword Coast Legends) and the gamble didn't pay-off, it was a lot less stupid than Sillicon Knights and at least they made their bet on the game they already had the license for rather than on a sequel of a game that belonged to another company, and they didn't create Too Human so that's something at least.

No love for games that made me excited for something that isn't. Still waiting for a straight up DnD core rules in video game form. Closest was Neverwinter Nights.

Saelune:
No love for games that made me excited for something that isn't. Still waiting for a straight up DnD core rules in video game form. Closest was Neverwinter Nights.

The Temple of Elemental Evil, circa 2003. D&D 3.5 almost verbatim, turn based and all.

ToEE's static graphics belie it's age; it's all painted backgrounds everywhere, probably inspired by Baldur's Gate. Animations OTOH can be generously referred to as sparse.

It's 6 bucks on GOG and comes pre-patched; do NOT patch the GOG version. That said, the official patches barely begin to touch the swarm of bugs. You'll need the Circle of Eight modpack to get this thing to run right, and installation is painless. Just don't put ToEE into the default folder, vintage games and Program Files don't play nice.
http://www.moddb.com/mods/circle-of-eight-modpack

That's not to say it's perfect. Modders didn't include high level feats when they raised the level cap, so Barbarians and dual wielding kinda suck. There's also a short list of unfixable bugs that you can easily steer around:
http://www.co8.org/forum/showthread.php?t=7737

Don't let Atari's buggy trainwreck of an initial release dissuade you, and don't let my warnings scare you away. As long as you don't mind saving manually, and even then only out of combat, the game runs as well as most fully patched retail releases. A decade(!) of work by dozens of fans went into these fixes, and it shows.

 

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