YouTube Creators Will Receive Money Earned During Content ID Disputes After New Update

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YouTube Creators Will Receive Money Earned During Content ID Disputes After New Update

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YouTube is updating its Content ID policy to give revenue earned during a dispute to the party that wins the dispute.

YouTube's Content ID system has been criticized for a number of reasons, but one of the biggest was that the video hosting site would turn off revenue for videos that were disputed under the site's Content ID system. This could result in bogus reports causing videos to earn little or nothing for their creators, even though no rules had been broken. YouTube said of the system now, "Currently videos that are claimed and disputed don't earn revenue for anyone, which is an especially frustrating experience for creators if that claim ends up being incorrect while a video racks up views in its first few days"

YouTube is responding to these criticisms with a positive step forward. In a blog post today, they announced a new system that is under development. This new system will take the money earned by a disputed video, and place it into a separate account. Once the claim is adjudicated and settled, the money will be awarded to the party who was found to be in the right.

"We strongly believe in fair use and believe that this improvement to Content ID will make a real difference," said the company in its post.

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YouTube also says they want Content ID to be used properly, and that they have "built a dedicated team to monitor" the service that "restricts feature access and even terminates a partner's access to Content ID tools" in the event of repeated abuse.

It's good to see YouTube responding to these concerns, and hopefully this will help address the issues that content creators have had with the service. Now if they'd just address the other suggestions that Shamus had.

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I'm pretty sure Shamus wasn't the first to bring this up, but it's a first and very important step, to mitigate some of the ridiculous claims that youtubers face.

This solves one of the numerous major problems with YouTube at the moment and is definitely a step in the right direction, but only a step.

A step in the right direction I'll say, this is pretty much going to kill the copyright trolls.

And lo and behold Jim just found a loophole around monetization on his videos.

It's about god damned time. Why it took so long to deal with this is insane.

MiskWisk:
It's about god damned time. Why it took so long to deal with this is insane.

Laws on internet content barely exist is why.

Wonder how much this'll actually bring down the groups that exist entirely to make money off other people's videos with fake content claims that they expect people not to fight.

Now all we need is negative strikes for false claims and we're golden youtube.
What I would pay to see a big company like Nintendo or Sega get a strike against their channel right before a big event and be completely hamstrung because a false claim they submitted got overturned.

Too little too late. I am absolutely out of patience for Youtube. Fixing one of several chronic problems and calling it a day is not good enough.

Nice to see that they are at least trying, While it doesn't fix the system, it will at the very least make it far less crippling to content creators income streams to be on the receiving end of trolls.

This is definitely a step in the right direction. I only hope that more policy changes like this will follow. Too bad things had to get so ugly before Youtube bothered to act, though.

Well, considering the stink many prominent Youtubers created about this, #wheresthefairuse campaign etc etc ect, this was bound to happen.

Mainstream professional youtubers, who comment and use video game footage to support their video deserve the money and should be protected under fair use/review laws. Even Let's players = in specific situations, deserve to get the money.

I feel Youtube has had to do this considering a lot of tubers were moving to Patreon/subscription (jim Sterling, Channel Awesome, Yogscast) others who had it in place already had begun to move closer to it (Total Biscuit/ Jesse Cox/ Dodger etc etc) and it was starting to hurt content addition to youtube and also their income revenue itself.

So, yeah, feel this is "we have to do something..." as google WAS making money off the "official" channels for major companies etc.

Looks like WTFU actually accomplished something. I seem to remember that Nostalgia Critic suggested this very fix as a possible solution to one of Youtube's major problems for content creators and reviewers. He may not have been the first, but I would say that his WTFU campaign is a major reason for this change.

I'll share the sentiment of others. It's about damn time. Now, what about the other issues?

Good for them... though hopefully Youtube will keep to it, so the Copyright Trolls can't do any more harm... *Knocks on wood*

I don't really know what to think about Youtube. They've made a few positive steps like this over the last few years but then seem to randomly swing back in the other direction with no warning.

RaikuFA:
And lo and behold Jim just found a loophole around monetization on his videos.

That's a loophole in Content ID, a different problem entirely
It also dose not let you get money from ads, it just stops anyone from getting money from ads.

good, it's about time they started unfucking themselves.

Smilomaniac:
I'm pretty sure Shamus wasn't the first to bring this up, but it's a first and very important step, to mitigate some of the ridiculous claims that youtubers face.

Plenty of people have brought it up in various forms. Shamus just had an Escapist article on it so why not make a link of opportunity when it comes up? If ffronw has the "forum reflexes" feat, he could make as many links of opportunity a round as the relevant stat bonus.

This is a long time coming and now people can't penalize videos that espouse social or political views they disagree with quite so readily. Thwarting copyright trolls and making the system more balanced is welcome. Should have been done ages ago but better late than never in this particular case.

Rednog:
Now all we need is negative strikes for false claims and we're golden youtube.
What I would pay to see a big company like Nintendo or Sega get a strike against their channel right before a big event and be completely hamstrung because a false claim they submitted got overturned.

"YouTube will also says they want Content ID to be used properly, and that they have "built a dedicated team to monitor" the service that "restricts feature access and even terminates a partner's access to Content ID tools" in the event of repeated abuse."

I don't know if that's exactly what you were thinking, but it sounds like Youtube is working on tracking down the most blatant abuse. I don't know how successful they will be, especially in light of their existing track record, but this is all a solid move in the right direction. I just hope it actually sticks.

That's certainly good news, glad to hear that YouTube is finally stepping up to the plate like it should have been doing all along.

In other news: Doug Walker's "Where's The Fair Use?" campaign is apparently gaining a lot of traction.

Posted 2 hours ago (as of writing):

ffronw:
YouTube will also says they want Content ID to be used properly

This is a typo I sometimes make when writing. Look, guys, I know it's impossible to write anything without making typos, but that's what EDITORS are for. That's what PROOFREADING is for. You aren't writing novels, you're writing articles that tend to be less than 100 words, but it seems like every other article I read has at least one typo like this. It comes across as unprofessional and surely you have the ability to avoid this far more often than you do.

On topic, all I can say is that at least this is a start. Given that the person filing the claim can't make any money unless they win the claim, this should reduce a noticeable number of illegitimate copyright claims. Let's see if they keep it up, or if Hollywood and the RIAA pulls out the horsewhips and beat them back into submission.

Pfft. A band-aid, nothing more. There's nothing here about the 'strike' system, and THAT's the one that needs changing above all. Youtube desperately needs to unfuck itself insofar as users who hand out false copyright takedown notices (such as censorship-happy hack developers, Nintendo, Konami etc) have to feel some sort of punishment for that behaviour.

RJ Dalton:

ffronw:
YouTube will also says they want Content ID to be used properly

This is a typo I sometimes make when writing. Look, guys, I know it's impossible to write anything without making typos, but that's what EDITORS are for. That's what PROOFREADING is for. You aren't writing novels, you're writing articles that tend to be less than 100 words, but it seems like every other article I read has at least one typo like this. It comes across as unprofessional and surely you have the ability to avoid this far more often than you do.

Keep pointing them out. I read every article a couple of times, but sometimes my brain just ignores the typos anyway.

Thanks for finding it.

Good but the progress must be followed up. There's still a lot of abuse on the site.

Well, it's a start...

Rednog:
Now all we need is negative strikes for false claims and we're golden youtube.
What I would pay to see a big company like Nintendo or Sega get a strike against their channel right before a big event and be completely hamstrung because a false claim they submitted got overturned.

It won't work for someone as big as Nintendo, but it may stop someone like The Fine Bros. At the end of the day, the issues are still settled in the court, and youtube can't afford to fight the entire entertainment industry, even if their in the right.

Fox12:
Well, it's a start...

Rednog:
Now all we need is negative strikes for false claims and we're golden youtube.
What I would pay to see a big company like Nintendo or Sega get a strike against their channel right before a big event and be completely hamstrung because a false claim they submitted got overturned.

It won't work for someone as big as Nintendo, but it may stop someone like The Fine Bros. At the end of the day, the issues are still settled in the court, and youtube can't afford to fight the entire entertainment industry, even if their in the right.

Actually, if they are in the right, then the courts will over turn the entertainment industries cases as frivolous. What are those companies going to do? FORCE Youtube to take down stuff? Stop uploading stuff on Youtube? Yeah right, Youtube has so much market share that the relationship is very equal. Keep in mind they aren't fighting Youtube, they're fighting Google, the people who have one of the most well used search engines on the planet. Ten lines of code and that company's links are now at the bottom of the list.

Giving strikes to false claimants, like big developers won't happen. YouTubes needs the sliver of their ad revenue just as much as the developer needs YouTube to push it's product. Eliminating the three strike system would be enough, and YouTube would (on a case by case basis) manually ban repeat offenders who are found to be in true violation.

Youtube actually domes something positive? i should watch out for flying pigs today.

Though its still very far from being a good system. And i can still singlehandedly take down entire channels by making false claims if i wanted to, because youtube does not check any of the stuff until an appeal is made. And i can keep ALL of your videos perpetually in copyright claim hell by repeated claims that will get released 30 days later. I may not be able to make money of it now but i can still ruin channels this way. and i shouldnt be able to.

Still doesn't adress the fact that these claims can be made just to mess with people, and doesn't at all adress false DMCA claims but it's a good first step.

Funny enough the latest Jimquisition is on just this topic. Jim found that by cherry picking multiple snippets of content he knew for a fact would be flagged by content ID by multiple claimants, he can ensure none of them can monetise his content since if there are multiple claims apparently none of them can control it.

This is a small but positive step, but I don't think it's enough. The system is so utterly absurd as it stands, by treating everyone as guilty until proven innocent.

On a semi-related topic:

One of my videos on YouTube was flagged for content when I first uploaded it. It was something much like the Hitler rant videos i.e. what is actually being said and the subtitles displayed are nowhere near exact and is being used to parody an event/game etc.

I translated someone elses subtitled video into English. This video contained footage/sound from LOTR where Gandalf rides to meet Saruman. The subtitles the original uploader put on the video was parodying an event in this game.

I found a russian dub of this scene and put up a translation of the subtitles from the original uploader. Not monetised or anything.

Warner (and yes the actual people) have claimed it and have set it so money goes to them (good luck with that since I have made the video private since that claim came in).

So what we have here is a video containing footage and audio from a movie, with 'creative' subtitles parodying a third party's product.

I dont know really where I stand here...

A good start, but they also need to do a percentage distribution. If a copyrighted song plays for 20 seconds in a 5 minute video, that shouldn't result in 100% of the revenue going to the copyright holder, but they do deserve some.

ffronw:
YouTube said of the system now, "Currently videos that are claimed and disputed don't earn revenue for anyone

Well that's obviously not true - they still earn revenue for YouTube. Which is, of course, why they didn't bother doing anything about it before.

This is a step in the right direction, but I think there are still a few potential problems that leave open the possibility of abuse by copyright claimants.

The biggest problem is that it doesn't cost anything to issue copyright claims , and that no matter the validity of the claim it takes loads of time for the dispute to settle. So now we will hopefully get less copyright trolls that leaches off content creators, but this doesn't resolve the problem of copyright holders (often using crappy software) issuing mass/automatic claims and stopping content creators from getting any money.

So better, but still not great. I think to truly protect the rights of the legitimate content creator, there needs to be a penalty in place to stop abuser of the claims system, not just holding the money until the dispute is settled.

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