Nvidia's GTX 1080 Goes on Sale, Promptly Sells Out Everywhere

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Nvidia's GTX 1080 Goes on Sale, Promptly Sells Out Everywhere

gtx-1080-320

The newest video card from Nvidia is now available, but it's already sold out pretty much everywhere.

If you've been hoping to grab yourself one of Nvidia's new GTX 1080 video cards, you may have missed out on your first chance already. The "Founders Edition" of cards went on sale this morning, and checking a number of retailers, it appears that it's already out of stock basically everywhere.

The new cards have been of great interest to PC gamers, especially after Nvidia's reveal, in which they showed them to be more powerful for gaming than the company's $1,000 Titan cards. The GTX 1080 is priced at $599, with the "Founder's Edition" coming in at $699. The new cards are also more efficient, requiring less power to operate.

No doubt we'll see more stock at retailers soon, but if you were hoping to be one of the first with a GTX 1080 in your PC, it's probably already too late. If you're looking to save a few bucks, you could always wait until June 10, when the GTX 1070 hits stores. You might want to be prepared for it, though, as it's likely to sell out just as fast.

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A top end card that comes just into my price range is nice, but ?400~ is a bit much for a reference card. I'll wait for Gigabyte to jam a triple fan Windforce cooler on it. So long as that comes in under ?500 I'll be a happy bunny.

It's really odd why the "Founder's Edition" (a fancy name for a reference card) is priced $100 higher than the clearly superior AIB cards. It really seems like Nvidia is cashing in on people who are impatient or simply don't know any better.

Reviewers who received a Founder's Edition GTX 1080 in advance have noticed that the card suffers pretty badly from thermal throttling issues. This means that after say 30 minutes of gaming, rising temperatures cause the core clocks to drop (ie. throttling) leading to a significant performance drop. It also suggests that the Founder's Edition will overclock very poorly.

The cheaper AIB cards produced by EVGA, MSI, ASUS, etc will hopefully not have the same issue as they have far better coolers (2-3 axial fans vs. 1 blower fan). Some of the AIB cards even have a second 8-pin power connector, meaning that the card's performance will be far more stable and will overclock far better. If I were in the market for a 1080, I would make sure to get one from a reputable partner company that has 3 axial fans and a 2nd 8-pin power connector.

DX12 performance for the 1080 isn't great either. In some games, we actually see slightly negative performance scaling when shifting from DX11 to DX12 modes. Not that it really matters at resolutions lower than 4K...the card's brute force performance can take on any title at 1080p or 1440p.

Higgs303:
It's really odd why the "Founder's Edition" (a fancy name for a reference card) is priced $100 higher than the clearly superior AIB cards. It really seems like Nvidia is cashing in on people who are impatient or simply don't know any better.

Reviewers who received a Founder's Edition GTX 1080 in advance have noticed that the 1080 Founder's Edition suffers from thermal throttling issues. This means that after say 30 minutes of gaming, rising temperatures cause the core clocks to drop (ie. throttling) leading to a significant performance drop. It also suggests that the Founder's Edition will overclock very poorly.

The cheaper AIB cards produced by EVGA, MSI, ASUS, etc will hopefully not have the same issue as they have far better coolers (2-3 axial fans vs. 1 blower fan). Some of the AIB cards even have a second 8-pin power connector, meaning that the card performance will be far more stable and will overclock far better. If I were in the market for a 1080, I would make sure to get one from a reputable partner company that has 3 axial fans and a 2nd 8-pin power connector.

I'd say your advice is sound in pretty much every generation of video cards. I'd also rant about how early adoption of new tech is almost universally a bad idea. You pay more for less, you are likely to have to deal with greater instability and other technical problems and it can be much harder to find good deals. Video cards are just one of those things that need to be out for some time before I'm willing to invest in the newest toys. The whole idea that someone is a "founder" is silly marketing rhetoric designed to make people feel special for doing something silly.

Gorrath:

Higgs303:
It's really odd why the "Founder's Edition" (a fancy name for a reference card) is priced $100 higher than the clearly superior AIB cards. It really seems like Nvidia is cashing in on people who are impatient or simply don't know any better.

Reviewers who received a Founder's Edition GTX 1080 in advance have noticed that the 1080 Founder's Edition suffers from thermal throttling issues. This means that after say 30 minutes of gaming, rising temperatures cause the core clocks to drop (ie. throttling) leading to a significant performance drop. It also suggests that the Founder's Edition will overclock very poorly.

The cheaper AIB cards produced by EVGA, MSI, ASUS, etc will hopefully not have the same issue as they have far better coolers (2-3 axial fans vs. 1 blower fan). Some of the AIB cards even have a second 8-pin power connector, meaning that the card performance will be far more stable and will overclock far better. If I were in the market for a 1080, I would make sure to get one from a reputable partner company that has 3 axial fans and a 2nd 8-pin power connector.

I'd say your advice is sound in pretty much every generation of video cards. I'd also rant about how early adoption of new tech is almost universally a bad idea. You pay more for less, you are likely to have to deal with greater instability and other technical problems and it can be much harder to find good deals. Video cards are just one of those things that need to be out for some time before I'm willing to invest in the newest toys. The whole idea that someone is a "founder" is silly marketing rhetoric designed to make people feel special for doing something silly.

Yea, I definitely agree with your point about early adoption. However, this is the first time a GPU company has actually priced reference cards significantly higher than the partner's cards. Usually, they are priced around $50 cheaper.

Higgs303:

Gorrath:

Higgs303:
It's really odd why the "Founder's Edition" (a fancy name for a reference card) is priced $100 higher than the clearly superior AIB cards. It really seems like Nvidia is cashing in on people who are impatient or simply don't know any better.

Reviewers who received a Founder's Edition GTX 1080 in advance have noticed that the 1080 Founder's Edition suffers from thermal throttling issues. This means that after say 30 minutes of gaming, rising temperatures cause the core clocks to drop (ie. throttling) leading to a significant performance drop. It also suggests that the Founder's Edition will overclock very poorly.

The cheaper AIB cards produced by EVGA, MSI, ASUS, etc will hopefully not have the same issue as they have far better coolers (2-3 axial fans vs. 1 blower fan). Some of the AIB cards even have a second 8-pin power connector, meaning that the card performance will be far more stable and will overclock far better. If I were in the market for a 1080, I would make sure to get one from a reputable partner company that has 3 axial fans and a 2nd 8-pin power connector.

I'd say your advice is sound in pretty much every generation of video cards. I'd also rant about how early adoption of new tech is almost universally a bad idea. You pay more for less, you are likely to have to deal with greater instability and other technical problems and it can be much harder to find good deals. Video cards are just one of those things that need to be out for some time before I'm willing to invest in the newest toys. The whole idea that someone is a "founder" is silly marketing rhetoric designed to make people feel special for doing something silly.

Yea, I definitely agree with your point about early adoption. However, this is the first time a GPU company has actually priced reference cards significantly higher than the partner's cards. Usually, they are priced around $50 cheaper.

Right, which is part of why it's screams gimmick to me. I mean, I'm sure the cards are probably really damned good and will be even better once the kinks get ironed out but, as you say, pricing a reference card higher than what will almost certainly be superior partner cards is especially nonsensical.

Gorrath:
pricing a reference card higher than what will almost certainly be superior partner cards is especially nonsensical.

It makes sense for the following entities: Nvidia , Nvidia zealots, Boutique builders, People with more money than f*ks to give. For the rest, no it doesn't.

Its definitely worth waiting for the partner cards, the founders GTX 1080 has been shown to have a boost clock that is basically useless as the card its the thermal limit very quickly and has to turn the boost off. So a partner card is a no brainer really, they will almost definitely run cooler and thus a bit faster and cost less.

Higgs303:
It's really odd why the "Founder's Edition" (a fancy name for a reference card) is priced $100 higher than the clearly superior AIB cards. It really seems like Nvidia is cashing in on people who are impatient or simply don't know any better.

To some enthusiasts, getting to brag that you have a "Founder's Edition" card on a forum is well worth the extra hundred bucks!

The Rogue Wolf:

Higgs303:
It's really odd why the "Founder's Edition" (a fancy name for a reference card) is priced $100 higher than the clearly superior AIB cards. It really seems like Nvidia is cashing in on people who are impatient or simply don't know any better.

To some enthusiasts, getting to brag that you have a "Founder's Edition" card on a forum is well worth the extra hundred bucks!

Judging by some of the PC enthusiast forums I peruse, bragging about owning a FE is only going to get you viciously mocked...though what doesn't when it comes to some of those dudes.

Or - OR... I could get two second hand 780ti at half that price and run smoothly anything that will come out for the next six to seven years, perhaps excluding VR.

Are the 980s cheaper yet?

The Rogue Wolf:

Higgs303:
It's really odd why the "Founder's Edition" (a fancy name for a reference card) is priced $100 higher than the clearly superior AIB cards. It really seems like Nvidia is cashing in on people who are impatient or simply don't know any better.

To some enthusiasts, getting to brag that you have a "Founder's Edition" card on a forum is well worth the extra hundred bucks!

Actually... that would get you mocked. Hard.
*And deserved*

Nurb:
Are the 980s cheaper yet?

Based on what I know of economics, 980s will be cheaper when the supply of 1080s catches up with demand. Then it will be hard to sell 980s at their current price, and their price will go down.

Businesses usually only drop prices when forced to.

There are retailers selling the card for $1,000 now.

Bad Jim:

Nurb:
Are the 980s cheaper yet?

Based on what I know of economics, 980s will be cheaper when the supply of 1080s catches up with demand. Then it will be hard to sell 980s at their current price, and their price will go down.

Businesses usually only drop prices when forced to.

Used ones will get cheaper but they don't do price reductions typically on the old models, they just stop restocking the retail channels and let stock run out on its own. At best you might find a small rebate. This is how it is always been for these parts.

Zulnam:
Or - OR... I could get two second hand 780ti at half that price and run smoothly anything that will come out for the next six to seven years, perhaps excluding VR.

Considering that Kepler has not so good tessellation performance, the 780Ti only has 3GB of VRAM and that SLI support seems to be getting worse, I'd be hesitant to call this statement anything more than a pipe dream.

ffronw:
Nvidia's GTX 1080 Goes on Sale, Promptly Sells Out Everywhere

Translation. nVidia deliberately understocks card to create illusion of high demand and scarcity.. COme on, this is oldest trick in the book. Not like it matters, I mean by december well be hearing about the next great card they have.

$600?!

And people bitch about console exclusive games when they can buy a PS4 for $350 to play them ...

I pre-ordered the ROG Strix edition the minute you could on the 27th so hopefully I should get it on the day. I really didn't want a card that thermal throttles and was ?100 extra, it looks like a pretty good card though and it still has the 2nd 6pin connector which is nice because my PSU happens to carry both the 8pin and 6 pin on the same connectors.

http://www.asus.com/Graphics-Cards/ROG-STRIX-GTX1080-O8G-GAMING/?_ga=1.25149625.2020857147.1464428433

I'm still stuck with my R9 270...

Should I just wait now, or is there a good card to upgrade to that won't break the bank?

marioandsonic:
I'm still stuck with my R9 270...

Should I just wait now, or is there a good card to upgrade to that won't break the bank?

The upcoming R9 480 series and GTX 1060 should be in the $200-300 price range. The R9 470 series has also been confirmed and should be priced in the $150-200 range. All three cards should be on the market by late summer. I would wait for these cards to launch, it would be a shame to spend money on an older gen card only to have a much faster one launch a few weeks later for the same price.

deadish:
$600?!

And people bitch about console exclusive games when they can buy a PS4 for $350 to play them ...

PS4 games run like trash, though. This doesn't.

Higgs303:

marioandsonic:
I'm still stuck with my R9 270...

Should I just wait now, or is there a good card to upgrade to that won't break the bank?

The upcoming R9 480 series and GTX 1060 should be in the $200-300 price range. The R9 470 series has also been confirmed and should be priced in the $150-200 range. All three cards should be on the market by late summer. I would wait for these cards to launch, it would be a shame to spend money on an older gen card only to have a much faster one launch a few weeks later for the same price.

Sounds good. Maybe I'll buy one of those once they come out, though I'm a bit hesitant to buy a card as soon as it comes out...

Amir Kondori:

Bad Jim:

Nurb:
Are the 980s cheaper yet?

Based on what I know of economics, 980s will be cheaper when the supply of 1080s catches up with demand. Then it will be hard to sell 980s at their current price, and their price will go down.

Businesses usually only drop prices when forced to.

Used ones will get cheaper but they don't do price reductions typically on the old models, they just stop restocking the retail channels and let stock run out on its own. At best you might find a small rebate. This is how it is always been for these parts.

This. I often go to http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html, newegg.com and microcenter.com to compare and I just do not ever see the GTX cards go down in price. They just stop being available new. I do recall seeing an Ebay sale of two GTX 570s for a total price of $80. That is a bargain, but when you think of how much power it is to run them when you could just get a new GTX 970 that can do DX 12, if you are that much an enthusiast, spend the extra money.

Gundam GP01:

deadish:
$600?!

And people bitch about console exclusive games when they can buy a PS4 for $350 to play them ...

PS4 games run like trash, though. This doesn't.

But damn, $600 for a component, not even an entire system ...

Don't know about some of your guys but I ain't made of cash.

deadish:

Gundam GP01:

deadish:
$600?!

And people bitch about console exclusive games when they can buy a PS4 for $350 to play them ...

PS4 games run like trash, though. This doesn't.

But damn, $600 for a component, not even an entire system ...

Don't know about some of your guys but I ain't made of cash.

You do realize you do not need Gimpvideas' new overpriced GPU in order to play games better than a PS4?

Part of why I am a PC Gamers (as is most of Eastern Europe) is due to the lower cost. PC Gaming is just cheaper, consoles are for rich Westerners ...

Gorrath:

Right, which is part of why it's screams gimmick to me. I mean, I'm sure the cards are probably really damned good and will be even better once the kinks get ironed out but, as you say, pricing a reference card higher than what will almost certainly be superior partner cards is especially nonsensical.

Not really. They do that as to not undercut their broad partners. As for why they are going to keep the references card available I'm not too sure why but I'm glade they are. There are people who prefer them and more options are always a plus.

Magmarock:

Gorrath:

Right, which is part of why it's screams gimmick to me. I mean, I'm sure the cards are probably really damned good and will be even better once the kinks get ironed out but, as you say, pricing a reference card higher than what will almost certainly be superior partner cards is especially nonsensical.

Not really. They do that as to not undercut their broad partners. As for why they are going to keep the references card available I'm not too sure why but I'm glade they are. There are people who prefer them and more options are always a plus.

No, they do that so that they fall somewhere in the middle of the pack depending on what offerings come from the partner cards. Calling it "founder's edition" is the gimmicky part of this since the 1080 offering from nvidia is just your typical reference card re-branded for marketing reasons. This re-branding is unusual as is the price increase. I, like the person I responded to, have seen reference cards usually priced toward the low end of the pack, not the middle. Somewhere around $50 cheaper than most of the AIB offerings.

I'm none too fond of this and the confusion it caused since there seems to have been no real reason for it. While I agree that, generally speaking, having more options tends to be better, introducing options that needlessly cause confusion and that don't add anything isn't a good option. While it's not a universal truth, AIB cards are generally going to, at the very least, have superior cooling options than the reference card and for a sizeable discount this time around.

You say some prefer the reference versions but I can't imagine why. I could see preferring a reference version to some specific AIB types or manufacturers, but to the whole field? Why on Earth would anyone pay 100 bucks over MSRP for a card that will have worse cooling and probably less overclocking capacity and other options like additional onboard memory? Sure, not everyone overclocks, but if you don't care about that and thus don't need the superior power input and cooling options, you'd still be paying more for the reference card than for an AIB with same/similar specs.

Can you think of any reason someone would prefer an almost assured performance drop in a higher priced reference card over the field of AIBs? What is the reasoning behind this except maybe looks?

MonsterCrit:

ffronw:
Nvidia's GTX 1080 Goes on Sale, Promptly Sells Out Everywhere

Translation. nVidia deliberately understocks card to create illusion of high demand and scarcity.. COme on, this is oldest trick in the book. Not like it matters, I mean by december well be hearing about the next great card they have.

New architecture releases are always like this, the flagship cards always sell like hot cakes. Nvidia has been purposefully creating hype for Pascal for months as well as pushing Global Foundries to produce and ship as many chips on the new 16nm process as possible. It's the first new architecture in two years meaning that they have no reason not to ship as many as possible because resellers sure as hell won't have any trouble moving stock.

And yes, there is likely going to be a 1080Ti announced by the end of the year, but also second generation Pascal will probably be unveiled within 6-8 months.

Looks like some of the AIB cards are suffering from thermal throttling and/or voltage issues as well. The ASUS ROG Strix can only be pushed 48 MHz beyond factory settings before becoming unstable. That said, the new DDR5X memory does have excellent overclocking potential. The Strix only has a 8-pin plus a 6-pin power connector, so if you want to do any overclocking (and you should if you are willing to pay that much money for a GPU) you should perhaps limit your choices to models with 2 8-pin connectors. The Zotac Amp Extreme looks the most promising IMO.

Looks like Nvidia was being rather underhanded when they demoed an air-cooled GTX 1080 with the core clock set above 2100 MHz. CEO Huang even went on to claim that it could be pushed even further. So far even the best cooled cards are having trouble staying above 2000-2050 MHz. This is what happens when the competition (AMD) can't get their act together and the market moves towards a monopoly: contempt for consumers. Polaris and Vega better be damn good products otherwise AMD is going to be AMDead.

http://videocardz.com/60631/asus-rog-strix-geforce-gtx-1080-offers-poor-overclocking

This was expected. Sadly most of them sold to price scalpers, expect to see higher price versions on ebay and the like.

Higgs303:

Reviewers who received a Founder's Edition GTX 1080 in advance have noticed that the card suffers pretty badly from thermal throttling issues. This means that after say 30 minutes of gaming, rising temperatures cause the core clocks to drop (ie. throttling) leading to a significant performance drop. It also suggests that the Founder's Edition will overclock very poorly.

Did they? I read the PCper tests and they seem to claim otherwise, with stock settings the clock speeds stabilized at above advertised on bellow specification thermal temperatures. They did have some limitation in overclocking, but we dont know if thats standard given that reviewers got ONLY founder edition cards so there is nothing to compare it to.

Personally im waiting for the partners versions because FE is most definatelly price scalping, but they are not inherently worse than reference.

DX12 performance for the 1080 isn't great either. In some games, we actually see slightly negative performance scaling when shifting from DX11 to DX12 modes. Not that it really matters at resolutions lower than 4K...the card's brute force performance can take on any title at 1080p or 1440p.

We also see the same thing on other cards though, so the card is not the fault here but rather the game design.

Zulnam:
Or - OR... I could get two second hand 780ti at half that price and run smoothly anything that will come out for the next six to seven years, perhaps excluding VR.

and deal with horrible SLI support, outdated tech design that game developers wont account for and cooling problems?

MonsterCrit:

Translation. nVidia deliberately understocks card to create illusion of high demand and scarcity.. COme on, this is oldest trick in the book. Not like it matters, I mean by december well be hearing about the next great card they have.

given the amount of release sales for this kind of thing, it would be quite hard to stock enough, especially given the large cost investment upfront (its not like cds where you can print them for couple cents and stock thousands in a truck).

Gorrath:

Magmarock:

Gorrath:

Right, which is part of why it's screams gimmick to me. I mean, I'm sure the cards are probably really damned good and will be even better once the kinks get ironed out but, as you say, pricing a reference card higher than what will almost certainly be superior partner cards is especially nonsensical.

Not really. They do that as to not undercut their broad partners. As for why they are going to keep the references card available I'm not too sure why but I'm glade they are. There are people who prefer them and more options are always a plus.

SNIP

Could you please keep your reply's short I've not read the entire thing I've got things to do. Why people prefer the FE cards; I don't know I'm not one of them. I'm sure Google will shed some light on that though. Also there's really not that much to be confused by. They called their references models founders editions and are going to keep it available for sale during the period. As for the reason they named it that; I dunno Probably just to give it a title instead of a generic term or something.

Strazdas:
This was expected. Sadly most of them sold to price scalpers, expect to see higher price versions on ebay and the like.

Higgs303:

Reviewers who received a Founder's Edition GTX 1080 in advance have noticed that the card suffers pretty badly from thermal throttling issues. This means that after say 30 minutes of gaming, rising temperatures cause the core clocks to drop (ie. throttling) leading to a significant performance drop. It also suggests that the Founder's Edition will overclock very poorly.

Did they? I read the PCper tests and they seem to claim otherwise, with stock settings the clock speeds stabilized at above advertised on bellow specification thermal temperatures. They did have some limitation in overclocking, but we dont know if thats standard given that reviewers got ONLY founder edition cards so there is nothing to compare it to.

Personally im waiting for the partners versions because FE is most definatelly price scalping, but they are not inherently worse than reference.

DX12 performance for the 1080 isn't great either. In some games, we actually see slightly negative performance scaling when shifting from DX11 to DX12 modes. Not that it really matters at resolutions lower than 4K...the card's brute force performance can take on any title at 1080p or 1440p.

We also see the same thing on other cards though, so the card is not the fault here but rather the game design.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OXUo1S55ZUM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=myDYnofz_JE&feature=youtu.be

Not surprisingly, the temps rise very quickly on the FE reference cards, but above 82 degrees they begin throttling core clocks below advertised speeds. The FE isn't a disaster, but it's hardly a product that is worth an additional $100. The thermal throttling issue and poor overclocking potential makes Nvidia's pricing all the more perplexing. When have reference cards ever been more expensive rather than cheaper? No explanation makes sense other than Nvidia is relying on hype to sell an inferior product for a premium.

I do think many AIB cards will show significant improvements in stability and overclock potential, they always do, but early reviews suggest they will need to add a 2nd 8-pin and a large heatsink setup.

As for DX12, Pascal shows no real difference in performance scaling over Maxwell. When your competitor does seem to be making notable improvements on much older cards, no significant FPS gain b/w Dx11 and DX12 with a brand new architecture is not terribly impressive. I still hear rumors of some sort of preemption driver coming down the Nvidia pipeline, so maybe this will all change.

Higgs303:
Looks like some of the AIB cards are suffering from thermal throttling and/or voltage issues as well. The ASUS ROG Strix can only be pushed 48 MHz beyond factory settings before becoming unstable. That said, the new DDR5X memory does have excellent overclocking potential. The Strix only has a 8-pin plus a 6-pin power connector, so if you want to do any overclocking (and you should if you are willing to pay that much money for a GPU) you should perhaps limit your choices to models with 2 8-pin connectors. The Zotac Amp Extreme looks the most promising IMO.

Looks like Nvidia was being rather underhanded when they demoed an air-cooled GTX 1080 with the core clock set above 2100 MHz. CEO Huang even went on to claim that it could be pushed even further. So far even the best cooled cards are having trouble staying above 2000-2050 MHz. This is what happens when the competition (AMD) can't get their act together and the market moves towards a monopoly: contempt for consumers. Polaris and Vega better be damn good products otherwise AMD is going to be AMDead.

http://videocardz.com/60631/asus-rog-strix-geforce-gtx-1080-offers-poor-overclocking

I too hope AMD gets their shit together. I am not and have never been a fan of their cards but I do want serious competition in the space. nVidia has seriously annoyed me on many occasions but their tech is usually the best. AMD at least keeps nVidia competitive even if that doesn't always translate to nVidia also being on the up and up with everything they do. I'd love to now only see AMD thrive, I also want to see a major third option emerge. The problem is just that this is an enthusiast market and one where it can be easy to see who's on top with a quick visit to places like Tom's Hardware.

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