First Trailer for Batman - The Telltale Series Features Advice from Alfred

First Trailer for Batman - The Telltale Series Features Advice from Alfred

Get a first look at what you can expect from Batman - The Telltale Series in this trailer.

Last week, Telltale announced that Batman - The Telltale Series would be released digitally in August. Yesterday, they rolled out a new trailer that shows off the game in action.

You'll get to see Bruce Wayne, get glimpses of the Batcave, and hear Alfred's advice for Bruce. The trailer also includes a number of familiar faces from the world of Batman, including Harvey Dent, Carmine Falcone, and Vicki Vale.

Batman - The Telltale Series is coming in August on digital stores, and will be in stores in September.

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Allow me to quote meself from the other thread:

MC1980:
Well that looks horribly cheap and animates like absolute crap. The sound mixing seems to be completely messed up too, I hope that's only the trailer. And Bat-Baker sounds exactly like I thought he would. He always does. I swear, his bland-o voice is the most immersion breaking thing about every game I play nowadays.

Doesn't help that he really seems to just do his phoned-in-but-presentable-performance if he's working for anyone but Naughty Dog. (Also makes me not give a shit about the character he voices. TFTBL was especially awful with the double combo of up jumped, oversaturated anime voice actors in Troy and Laura Bailey. Worst parts of the game really.)

Always with the iffy Brit voice impersonations in Batman games. Could they really not find a native wandering speaker for once?

Welcome to Telltale, where the story is already made up and choices don't matter.

Nurb:
Welcome to Telltale, where the story is already made up and choices don't matter.

As opposed to any other game, where stories are respectful detailed reconstructions of historic events, and the plot is full of choices that are both relevant and satisfying... Oh, wait.

hermes:

Nurb:
Welcome to Telltale, where the story is already made up and choices don't matter.

As opposed to any other game, where stories are respectful detailed reconstructions of historic events, and the plot is full of choices that are both relevant and satisfying... Oh, wait.

Those other games aren't advertizing themselves as a game where your choices change the story.

Nurb:
Those other games aren't advertizing themselves as a game where your choices change the story.

I'd say you're putting words in Telltale's mouth.

There's no escaping the fact that the constraints of video game design (memory, for instance) make it difficult to create widely branching storylines that include wide-ranging choices with complex ramifications. You're always influencing the liminal events, however, and usually have a binary choice at the end.

Go back to game design as it's expressed in RPGs or even Action Adventure titles. You'll realize you have even less control over the game's flow - and that what little is up to the player in Telltale titles is above the norm. Even Bethesda RPGs come with pre-set narrative elements and rough curves that stay the same no matter which faction you choose to ally yourself with.

Nurb:

hermes:

Nurb:
Welcome to Telltale, where the story is already made up and choices don't matter.

As opposed to any other game, where stories are respectful detailed reconstructions of historic events, and the plot is full of choices that are both relevant and satisfying... Oh, wait.

Those other games aren't advertizing themselves as a game where your choices change the story.

I never really understood that critique.

Do your actions and decisions affect the way other characters react to you? For the most part, yes. Do those reactions change the dynamic of your party, making some things easier or harder? Yes. So they deliver on that front. Sure, there is no line of choices that turns Walking Dead into Left for Dead, let you cure the zombie plague or become the King of Westeros, but that would be a) technically unrealistic expectations, and b) nonsense in terms of the source material.

In general, they create the illusion of choice around your character and his relationship with others, which creates context but doesn't change the plot. Then again, that is true in life too: the idea that no matter the choices you make, things will happen beyond your control. Despite what videogames writing tells you, player agency is not the only driving force of a setting, NPCs don't wait patiently until you solve their problems for them; and even when they seem to be everywhere, some of the settings they have chosen for their games (Game of Thrones, Walking Dead) are very good in terms of being settings where agency for the common folk accounts to almost nothing in the great scheme of things. You are not "the chosen one" and the world doesn't revolt around you, so at most all you can do is the best you can with what you got. That illusion of choice gets broken only if you try to replay it with different choices expecting radical outcomes on each turn, in which case, I think it is more on you for raising the curtain.

Admittedly, this is a weird one, because here you are the god damn Batman, but given that Tales of the Borderlands is the best writing to come out of a game with Borderlands in the title, I am at least, intrigued...

I like how they are actually handling the political and economic side of things this time. Enemies like falconi get too little screentime elsewhere because of the joker. He's a good character but he can't help but feel overused by this point

 

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