Stranger Things Will Run Four or Five Seasons

Stranger Things Will Run Four or Five Seasons

stranger things

Netflix original series Stranger Things had an explosive first season, and the showrunners have much more planned.

Stranger Things, the Netflix original series about a secret shadow world and a group of kids who stumble upon it, had an explosive first season and was generally very well received. A second season is already in development, and due out this Halloween, but for those of you worried (or perhaps, hoping) that the second season will tie things up, showrunner Matt Duffer has confirmed they are shooting for "four or five" seasons.

"I don't want it to be one of those shows that runs out of gas and they lose it because they're losing interest," Duffer told Entertainment Weekly. "You wanna end when you're on top."

Ron Duffer, expanded on the statement, saying that if there was a reason to continue past five seasons and it served both the audience and the show, they wouldn't say no to extending the series.

He added that "Hopefully you'll come to the end of season 2 and feel fully satisfied and want more but you'll feel like it has come to a conclusion. But also we've laid the ground work for further seasons."

Source: Entertainment Weekly

Permalink

I think 4 seasons would be for the best. 5 seems like an odd number to end on.

And with but a stroke I lost much confidence in the Show.

Seriously, you got off to a good start, follow that up with something good before putting your foot in your mouth.

I wonder if their desire to "change the world by acting" will influence the creation of further seasons.

I liked season one, but this is not a series that needs four seasons.

What I like about Stranger Things is the mystery and alien nature of the subject matter. If they drag it on too long, I think it'll lose a lot of what makes it so interesting. Who knows though, the first season was really good, so I have no reason to doubt that the next seasons won't be either. If they're putting a hard limit on the number of season, then they probably already have a good idea of where they want to take the story.

Why? The first season already felt slightly too long. The upside down isn't THAT interesting.

I'm just disappointed there isn't a more "set" storyline apparently. The attitude seems to be "we have a rough idea where we are going." Some of my favorite shows planned out (if not actually even wrote) storylines for the eventuality that they would have that many seasons. Write-as-you-go can work if you have a good team. But that's also where you can write yourself into a corner (issues like power creep) or go on way past "the good part" (like nearly 5 seasons of the X-Files.)

A great example is Babylon 5. 4 of the seasons had a complete outline that was mostly finished before even the first season aired. Then they got picked up for a 5th season. And very little after that 4th season was any good.

Well, this moved really fast from a show that has the potential of leaving me satisfied, to one that is likely going to run its course way after I lost interest.

I don't see the appeal. First season didn't know what it wanted to be. It was all over the place. First it wanted to be a kids sci-fi show, then a horror show, then a teenage romance drama and a regular adult drama. But absolutely none of the ideas were realized. They were just abandoned almost as soon as they were starting to develop. It's a bad show.

Adam Jensen:
I don't see the appeal. First season didn't know what it wanted to be. It was all over the place. First it wanted to be a kids sci-fi show, then a horror show, then a teenage romance drama and a regular adult drama.

Methinks you've missed the point a little if you think it wanted to be a "teenage romance drama" at any point. Stranger Things draws deep from the well of 70s and 80s horror cinema, and it enjoys subverting or playing with the tropes and expectations that brings up. That's why when the teenagers are getting pissed and having sex at the pool-party, we have been taught to expect that one of the horny, drunk teens is going to be the next victim-- that's how it plays in Friday 13th, and Scream, and dozens of others. That's why in Stranger Things it is Barbara who dies-- the one who isn't drinking, the one who isn't getting laid. It evokes the old scripts but then tips the expectations on their heads.

So too with the "romantic" sub-plot between Nancy and Steve. The sub-plot only even exists in homage to 70s & 80s horror film. We expect her to reject the jocky, bullying Steve, and end up with lonely outsider Jonathan. Teases it, subverts it.

That seen to be quite a stretch. I just hope the future season are well planned out and written too!

Silvanus:

Adam Jensen:
I don't see the appeal. First season didn't know what it wanted to be. It was all over the place. First it wanted to be a kids sci-fi show, then a horror show, then a teenage romance drama and a regular adult drama.

Methinks you've missed the point a little if you think it wanted to be a "teenage romance drama" at any point. Stranger Things draws deep from the well of 70s and 80s horror cinema, and it enjoys subverting or playing with the tropes and expectations that brings up. That's why when the teenagers are getting pissed and having sex at the pool-party, we have been taught to expect that one of the horny, drunk teens is going to be the next victim-- that's how it plays in Friday 13th, and Scream, and dozens of others. That's why in Stranger Things it is Barbara who dies-- the one who isn't drinking, the one who isn't getting laid. It evokes the old scripts but then tips the expectations on their heads.

So too with the "romantic" sub-plot between Nancy and Steve. The sub-plot only even exists in homage to 70s & 80s horror film. We expect her to reject the jocky, bullying Steve, and end up with lonely outsider Jonathan. Teases it, subverts it.

Fine, then it was totally intentional but it was just badly done. Either way it's a bad show IMO.

 

Reply to Thread

Posting on this forum is disabled.