No Man's Sky Wins GDC Award, But No-one Was There to Accept it

No Man's Sky Wins GDC Award, But No-one Was There to Accept it

Hello Games, the team behind No Man's Sky, were not expecting to win an award, and thus were not in attendance at the awards ceremony.

Every year, the Games Developers Conference has its "Games Developer's Choice Awards," which is kind of like a GoTY but from actual games developers. Overwatch, fairly predictably, won Game of The Year. Quite unpredictably, however, was No Man's Sky winning the Innovation award. If you're shocked, you're not alone, as even Hello Games, the team behind No Man's Sky, weren't expecting to get an award, and were absent from the awards ceremony. This led to poor host Tim Schafer trying to present an award that no-one would accept.

When Schafer announced that No Man's Sky had won he called out, "Going once... going twice..." but no-one showed up. Later, we learned via the Twitter account of Hello Games code lead Innes McKendrick, that the team had skipped the awards ceremony to get dinner.

McKendrick later said the developer's absence during its award win was "quite embarrassing". Considering the, for lack of a better word, vitriol surrounding the game, which currently sits at a "Mostly Negative" rating on Steam, you wouldn't blame him for not expecting an award.

The Innovation Award, according to the GDC, "recognizes games that demonstrate true innovation, advance the state of the art, and push the boundaries of games as an expressive medium."

Source: GDC, Twitter

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It says a lot about how nonsensical them winning that award was that they thought for certain that they wouldn't win it. Although this is kind of hilarious.

Embarrassing they werent there to receive it? Personally, I find it humbling of them to not bother.

"recognizes games that demonstrate true innovation, advance the state of the art, and push the boundaries of games as an expressive medium."

I was staring at this and wondering how No Man's Sky actually fit the description for winning and then I realised it's because they highlighted the fact that trailers may not represent gameplay anymore, truly pushing the boundaries of games. xD It says a lot when they don't even think their own game was going to considered at the GDC.

Very serious question. What did No Man's Sky actually innovate? I'm...I'm actually struggling to think of anything they did that wasn't done better in another, older game. Was it, was it really just for the size of their universe? Was that all it took to be considered innovative?

Well, they did innovate in ways to con people out of money for a glorified indie game. T'was very satisfying to see all those people who bought into the hype humbled.

"Look, this small game is embaaaaaaaaaaaarassing AAA game development. It tha bes" Yeah, how you like them apples.

Of course the developers conference gave them the award, in their eyes they are poor devs being bullied by those evil consumers, they misled and lied to to skim cash from them, but hey, they did everything in their power and promised a whole lot more beyond that so leave 'em alone.

But they didn't innovate at all? The technology is the same used in freaking Minecraft, just with loading screens in-between.

Innovation isn't really a meaningful concept anymore, is it?

Were they up against other nominees/know that they were nominated? Who did they beat out in this category? I have the game and honestly I've probably spent about 24 hours playing it between launch and the "foundation" update, and not at all in a long time. It wasn't innovative. It has about the same environmental diversity as Minecraft, with next to no enemy diversity, and Ratchet & Clank games have better spaceship battles etc.

There is absolutely nothing innovative about the game other than the complete lack of an ending or much at all to actually do. Noby Noby boy was innovative, and had almost nothing really to do and the whole learning languages thing was already done in FFX among others.

Literally every sliver of content in the game was already done, and done better, years ago. So...yeah I wouldn't have shown up either to accept an award I in no way deserved.

An Innovation award for what? What did that game innovate?
How to build hype for a scam? GDC looks more like a developer circlejerk where awards aren't given for merit.

I think the fact that Hello Games themselves think that they didn't deserve an award shows that... well, they didn't deserve an award.

How are nominees handled anyway? I thought all of them have to agree to being one or something.

I checked what the other nominees were out of curiosity, and they were: Firewatch, The Witness, Pokemon GO and Inside. The honorable mentions were That Dragon, Cancer, The Last Guardian, SUPERHOT, Thumper and Quadrilateral Cowboy.

Now, I've only played NMS, Superhot and Firewatch, but from what I know of the others, it really should have been a contest between Superhot, Thumper and Quad Cowboy. Not really sure how the actual nominees innovated in any way.

But hey, what do I know, I ain' no developer.

Why would NMS win an award for innovation?

Especially when there's wonky neat stuff like Quad Cowboy, or something particularly neat like Superhot?

Hell, didn't Pony Island come out last year? THAT was fucking innovative!

chrystallix:
Very serious question. What did No Man's Sky actually innovate? I'm...I'm actually struggling to think of anything they did that wasn't done better in another, older game. Was it, was it really just for the size of their universe? Was that all it took to be considered innovative?

ragnarokz:
But they didn't innovate at all? The technology is the same used in freaking Minecraft, just with loading screens in-between.

Innovation isn't really a meaningful concept anymore, is it?

aegix drakan:
Why would NMS win an award for innovation?

Especially when there's wonky neat stuff like Quad Cowboy, or something particularly neat like Superhot?

Hell, didn't Pony Island come out last year? THAT was fucking innovative!

Ok, you know how NMS has a lot of huge sized planets, 18 quintillion according to the wiki,across several galaxies? That's why.
The problem is that the planet's are all pretty much the same after a while, the gameplay gets boring after a few hours, and that they lied about a lot of things about what's in the game.

ryan_cs:

Ok, you know how NMS has a lot of huge sized planets, 18 quintillion according to the wiki,across several galaxies? That's why.

So it wins an award for innovation by being...3D Starbound, but with less to do?

That seems backwards for an innovation award.

Yeah, Quad Cowboy should have won. NMS COULD have won had the environments simply been a whole lot better generated but whatever.

aegix drakan:

ryan_cs:

Ok, you know how NMS has a lot of huge sized planets, 18 quintillion according to the wiki,across several galaxies? That's why.

So it wins an award for innovation by being...3D Starbound, but with less to do?

That seems backwards for an innovation award.

Well, Starbound only has around 13 quadrillion planets, NMS is literaly several magnitude bigger than Starbound, AND it's also in 3D.

This article talks about the largest game worlds, part of it talks about how NMS generates that many worlds. It's probably not be 100% how NMS handles it, but you might still find the article interesting:
http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=33711

ryan_cs:

aegix drakan:

ryan_cs:

Ok, you know how NMS has a lot of huge sized planets, 18 quintillion according to the wiki,across several galaxies? That's why.

So it wins an award for innovation by being...3D Starbound, but with less to do?

That seems backwards for an innovation award.

Well, Starbound only has around 13 quadrillion planets, NMS is literaly several magnitude bigger than Starbound, AND it's also in 3D.

This article talks about the largest game worlds, part of it talks about how NMS generates that many worlds. It's probably not be 100% how NMS handles it, but you might still find the article interesting:
http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=33711

Eehhhhh, I guess. But size doesn't impress me. What matters is what you do with it.

Like Evhochron Legacy is freaking massive, and unlike Elite Dangerous, you can literally fly with your default engines to faraway planets if you want. But it's still big empty space, with procedurally generated worlds.

Minecraft is freakin' massive, but if everything was the same big grassy plains with no variety, it would be incredibly dull.

I guess if it found some innovative way to handle procedural generation to make so many worlds, that's great, but size no longer impresses me after my experience with Evochron and Elite. Size is meaningless if all it does it make everything samey.

ryan_cs:

aegix drakan:

ryan_cs:

Ok, you know how NMS has a lot of huge sized planets, 18 quintillion according to the wiki,across several galaxies? That's why.

So it wins an award for innovation by being...3D Starbound, but with less to do?

That seems backwards for an innovation award.

Well, Starbound only has around 13 quadrillion planets, NMS is literaly several magnitude bigger than Starbound, AND it's also in 3D.

This article talks about the largest game worlds, part of it talks about how NMS generates that many worlds. It's probably not be 100% how NMS handles it, but you might still find the article interesting:
http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=33711

The technical impressiveness of the size of No Man's Sky kind of stumbles a bit once you realize that the game only ever physically contains a single star system at a time. And actually breaks if you try to escape the skybox for long enough.

aegix drakan:

ryan_cs:

aegix drakan:

So it wins an award for innovation by being...3D Starbound, but with less to do?

That seems backwards for an innovation award.

Well, Starbound only has around 13 quadrillion planets, NMS is literaly several magnitude bigger than Starbound, AND it's also in 3D.

This article talks about the largest game worlds, part of it talks about how NMS generates that many worlds. It's probably not be 100% how NMS handles it, but you might still find the article interesting:
http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=33711

Eehhhhh, I guess. But size doesn't impress me. What matters is what you do with it.

Like Evhochron Legacy is freaking massive, and unlike Elite Dangerous, you can literally fly with your default engines to faraway planets if you want. But it's still big empty space, with procedurally generated worlds.

Minecraft is freakin' massive, but if everything was the same big grassy plains with no variety, it would be incredibly dull.

I guess if it found some innovative way to handle procedural generation to make so many worlds, that's great, but size no longer impresses me after my experience with Evochron and Elite. Size is meaningless if all it does it make everything samey.

Yeah, I prefer a compact world with a lot of interesting things to do.

ryan_cs:

aegix drakan:

ryan_cs:

Ok, you know how NMS has a lot of huge sized planets, 18 quintillion according to the wiki,across several galaxies? That's why.

So it wins an award for innovation by being...3D Starbound, but with less to do?

That seems backwards for an innovation award.

Well, Starbound only has around 13 quadrillion planets, NMS is literaly several magnitude bigger than Starbound, AND it's also in 3D.

This article talks about the largest game worlds, part of it talks about how NMS generates that many worlds. It's probably not be 100% how NMS handles it, but you might still find the article interesting:
http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=33711

That really doesn't mean much of anything though. The developers simply let their extremely basic (based on how very, very similar all the worlds are) procedural generation program run for awhile longer. Instead of "for(i=0;i<5;i++)", NMS did "for(i=0;i<500;i++)." Something innovative would have been if said generation formula actually did produce the widely varied results that both the devs and trailers promised pre-release. More isn't innovative when it's simply another go-around of the algorithm.

Sounds like the developer community wanted to throw them a pity award and even Hello Games knew they didn't deserve it.

ryan_cs:

aegix drakan:

ryan_cs:

Ok, you know how NMS has a lot of huge sized planets, 18 quintillion according to the wiki,across several galaxies? That's why.

So it wins an award for innovation by being...3D Starbound, but with less to do?

That seems backwards for an innovation award.

Well, Starbound only has around 13 quadrillion planets, NMS is literaly several magnitude bigger than Starbound, AND it's also in 3D.

This article talks about the largest game worlds, part of it talks about how NMS generates that many worlds. It's probably not be 100% how NMS handles it, but you might still find the article interesting:
http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=33711

Isn't this kind of like giving the "Most Innovative Chef"-award to the guy who serves his soup in a water barrel instead of a soupbowl?

Mangod:

ryan_cs:

aegix drakan:

So it wins an award for innovation by being...3D Starbound, but with less to do?

That seems backwards for an innovation award.

Well, Starbound only has around 13 quadrillion planets, NMS is literaly several magnitude bigger than Starbound, AND it's also in 3D.

This article talks about the largest game worlds, part of it talks about how NMS generates that many worlds. It's probably not be 100% how NMS handles it, but you might still find the article interesting:
http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=33711

Isn't this kind of like giving the "Most Innovative Chef"-award to the guy who serves his soup in a water barrel instead of a soupbowl?

Bland soup, at that. I'd've given it to any other developer who put real work into their game. Hell, I'd've given it to The Last Guardian as a congratulatory "Nice work guys... You made it! Nobody thought you'd finish the game, but here you are and it's gorgeous!". Years of work and damn but they delivered. Ah well.

Maybe Hello Games could hire someone to bring the award to their office. AND THEN THEY'D GET A LESSON ON HOW TO DELIVER ho ho ho ho ho.

MC1980:
Well, they did innovate in ways to con people out of money for a glorified indie game.

Nah. Broken Age did that. And its ironic as hell that Tim Schafer is the host of the GDC.

Maybe they were there but they just couldn't see them.

AzrealMaximillion:

MC1980:
Well, they did innovate in ways to con people out of money for a glorified indie game.

Nah. Broken Age did that. And its ironic as hell that Tim Schafer is the host of the GDC.

Thanks for reminding me of the TS DownComing...

VincentX3:
Maybe they were there but they just couldn't see them.

they wereally there. Just the chance of actually seeing them was so small nobody could

Innovation on how to like in interviews and misrepresent their product maybe.

They don't deserve it, no matter what else they accomplished.

Is this considered being a poor sport?

I mean, noting the absence implies they were invited, which means that they made the decision not to attend the ceremony because they weren't going to win anything. I know we have some pretty mixed opinions about the merit of these ceremonies existing to start with....but it still strikes me as being a poor sport.

I guess the only thing they innovated was in polishing a turd.

The Rogue Wolf:
Maybe Hello Games could hire someone to bring the award to their office. AND THEN THEY'D GET A LESSON ON HOW TO DELIVER ho ho ho ho ho.

I nominate you for Burn of The Year.

How the hell did they win a GDC award? No Man's Sky was just another $15-20 indie survival game charged as a full priced AAA title. It did nothing, but build false hype and waste everyone's time.

Man SPORE did a better procedural generation galaxy than No Man's Sky.

Innovation award. Okay, if you say so...

 

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