New Elder Scrolls Online: Morrowind Video Takes You to Vvardenfell, PC System Requirements Announced

New Elder Scrolls Online: Morrowind Video Takes You to Vvardenfell, PC System Requirements Announced

There's a new trailer out for The Elder Scrolls Online: Morrowind that takes you to Vvardenfell, and the PC system requirements have been announced.

The Elder Scrolls Online is taking players back to Morrowind next month, and a new trailer is showing off the island of Vvardenfell. The events of the MMO take place 700 years prior to those of The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind.

The official description reads in part, "Play alone and become the mighty savior of Morrowind or group with friends to quest as a powerful unit through familiar locations such as the Ashlands, Tel Mora, or the Bitter Coast. Create a Warden, the new player class, to start your Elder Scrolls adventure anew and unleash devastating nature-based magic or bring your veteran character from other lands and continue your journey through Tamriel."

Want to know if you've got enough PC to run it? Zenimax Online has released the PC system requirements on the game's official website. Here they are:

Minimum Requirements:

  • OS: Windows 7 32-bit
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 540 or AMD A6-3620
  • RAM: 3GB
  • HDD: 85GB
  • VIDEO CARD: DirectX 11 compliant video card with 1 GB of RAM (NVIDIA GeForce 460 / AMD Radeon 6850) or higher

Recommended Requirements:

  • OS: Windows 7 64-bit
  • CPU: Intel Core i5 2300 or AMD FX4350
  • RAM: 8GB
  • HDD: 85GB
  • VIDEO CARD: DirectX 11 compliant video card with 2 GB of RAM (NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 or AMD Radeon HD 7850) or higher

These are the same system requirements that The Elder Scrolls Online currently has, so if you're playing the game fine right now, you should be good to go when the Morrowind expansion launches for PC, PS4, Xbox One, and Mac on June 6.

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Oh, wow! What a great opportunity to replay the original!

Yeah... just makes me want to replay the original.

Rastrelly:
Oh, wow! What a great opportunity to replay the original!

Ah yes... the original..

..about that.

evilthecat:

Rastrelly:
Oh, wow! What a great opportunity to replay the original!

Ah yes... the original..

..about that.

You have convinced me to buy 10 more copies of the game. In all seriousness, it was a fantastic, and wonky game. Alchemy, and stacking alcohol buffs was how I beat almalexia.

evilthecat:

Rastrelly:
Oh, wow! What a great opportunity to replay the original!

Ah yes... the original..

..about that.

Yeah, one of the things that makes it so awesome. What did you want to convey?

Rastrelly:

evilthecat:

Rastrelly:
Oh, wow! What a great opportunity to replay the original!

Ah yes... the original..

..about that.

Yeah, one of the things that makes it so awesome. What did you want to convey?

Heh, yeah the game was full of bugs and frustrations - but playing on PC you also have access to mods and such that fix a lot of the problems. Honestly, the ways you could exploit the spells and alchemy, who cares? It's pretty great that a game would give you that level of freedom.

SmugFrog:

Rastrelly:

evilthecat:

Ah yes... the original..

..about that.

Yeah, one of the things that makes it so awesome. What did you want to convey?

Heh, yeah the game was full of bugs and frustrations - but playing on PC you also have access to mods and such that fix a lot of the problems. Honestly, the ways you could exploit the spells and alchemy, who cares? It's pretty great that a game would give you that level of freedom.

Heh, I even experimented with my own rebalances )) Currently waiting for the epic Fullrest Repack 2.0 mod, it's going to be AWESOME.

Rastrelly:
Yeah, one of the things that makes it so awesome. What did you want to convey?

It's broken.

It's outright broken. Virtually every system doesn't work properly, down to the most basic and fundamental. It is, quite simply, one of the worst designed roleplaying games ever made.

In a world building and narrative sense, though, it's really good (certainly the best elder scrolls game) so people have retrospectively interpreted these huge design issues as "awesome" or charming as if they were ever intentional. It's not intentional that you can render the game impossible to complete by roiding yourself up with potions and hitting the final boss too hard, it's just that noone put that through QA. It's not intentional that you can crash the client by running too fast, it's just that noone bothered to gate your running speed to the limit the engine could actually tolerate.

Big Rigs: Over the Road Racing is not the greatest game of all time because the developers forgot to cap maximum speed while driving in reverse, meaning you can accelerate to 12.3 undecillion mph by driving backwards before the game just bugs out and causes you to win. This isn't "awesome" design, it's just bad design.

evilthecat:

Rastrelly:
Yeah, one of the things that makes it so awesome. What did you want to convey?

It's broken.

It's outright broken. Virtually every system doesn't work properly, down to the most basic and fundamental. It is, quite simply, one of the worst designed roleplaying games ever made.

In a world building and narrative sense, though, it's really good (certainly the best elder scrolls game) so people have retrospectively interpreted these huge design issues as "awesome" or charming as if they were ever intentional. It's not intentional that you can render the game impossible to complete by roiding yourself up with potions and hitting the final boss too hard, it's just that noone put that through QA. It's not intentional that you can crash the client by running too fast, it's just that noone bothered to gate your running speed to the limit the engine could actually tolerate.

Big Rigs: Over the Road Racing is not the greatest game of all time because the developers forgot to cap maximum speed while driving in reverse, meaning you can accelerate to 12.3 undecillion mph by driving backwards before the game just bugs out and causes you to win. This isn't "awesome" design, it's just bad design.

Yes, and newer TES games are so much better, with literally EVERY. SINGLE. THING. gated off, handed to you, built to match you and basically to never surprise. Morrowind has flaws, but they are topped by its setting, story, surroundings and overall complexity, that those flaws become barely noticeable. And also, no one - literally NO ONE makes you use gamebreaking features but you yourself. It's a roleplaying game FFS, do some roleplaying! Try being a dagger-wielding wizard wearing only robes, try being a naked psycho hitting everyone with bare fists, try playing a stealthy ninja with shurikens and katana. And there are tons of fixes and rebalances for almost all main issues, up to and including the Morrowind Code Patch, that actually fixes internal coding issues of the game, and soon-incoming OpenMW which is quite playable already. Morrowind was an extremely ambitious game, as well as Daggerfall before, and of course they are fucking broken - they could not be NOT broken. If they were - they'd never be so epic and enjoyable, ublike later installments, much more stable and balanced, but having even less soul then Dwemer Animunculi.

Rastrelly:
Yes, and newer TES games are so much better, with literally EVERY. SINGLE. THING. gated off, handed to you, built to match you and basically to never surprise.

Right, but that has nothing to do with any of the systems. As I pointed out, Morrowind deserves to be celebrated for its excellent world building, narrative and atmosphere, it also deserves to be mercilessly mocked for its horrific design decisions and bizarre and nonsensical systems.

Rastrelly:
literally NO ONE makes you use gamebreaking features but you yourself.

Short of modding the game, yes you do. You still have to use the absurdly anti-fun stamina system. You still have to use a levelling system which disproportionately rewards unintuitive skill grinding over actually playing the game. Unless you want to gate off huge sections of the game, you still have to use the insane magic system which turns every mage into a narcoleptic (or potion-chugger, which brings us back to broken alchemy) while also making magic useless because you can simply make a magic item to do the same thing without wasting the arbitrarily scarce magicka. "But it's a roleplaying game" doesn't work when roleplaying requires you to constantly fight against the game's own bizarre systems.

And the fact that mods can fix these things indicates that these issues have nothing to do with the ambitious nature of the game. They are simply bad design decisions.

evilthecat:

Rastrelly:
Yes, and newer TES games are so much better, with literally EVERY. SINGLE. THING. gated off, handed to you, built to match you and basically to never surprise.

Right, but that has nothing to do with any of the systems. As I pointed out, Morrowind deserves to be celebrated for its excellent world building, narrative and atmosphere, it also deserves to be mercilessly mocked for its horrific design decisions and bizarre and nonsensical systems.

Rastrelly:
literally NO ONE makes you use gamebreaking features but you yourself.

Short of modding the game, yes you do. You still have to use the absurdly anti-fun stamina system. You still have to use a levelling system which disproportionately rewards unintuitive skill grinding over actually playing the game. Unless you want to gate off huge sections of the game, you still have to use the insane magic system which turns every mage into a narcoleptic (or potion-chugger, which brings us back to broken alchemy) while also making magic useless because you can simply make a magic item to do the same thing without wasting the arbitrarily scarce magicka. "But it's a roleplaying game" doesn't work when roleplaying requires you to constantly fight against the game's own bizarre systems.

And the fact that mods can fix these things indicates that these issues have nothing to do with the ambitious nature of the game. They are simply bad design decisions.

Cannot agree. Look, I played Morrowind for over 10 years now (yeah, kinda late to the party). All those components are absolutely overlookable or overblown. Say, stamina: yes, when you run, you spend it. So, what's the solution? 1) Pump up athletics. High-level athletics skill makes you a marathon machine. 2) Keep stamina potions or stamina regen spells ready. Second option is even better - free restoration XP. Pretty much that's it. Unintuitive skill grinding? Only if you're playing with some 'insane difficulty mod'. In all other cases grind whatever you want, there's no unplayable build. You'll inevitably get to high stats sooner or later. On normal difficulty level you can just ignore all and any leveling tactics and play however you want, even werewolves, Karstaag and Lord Hircine himself will die like children. The game is built around the idea of how weak you are at the start, you just have to overcome it, grind some money on preferably peaceful quests ()but not necessarily - killing off dem pro assassins works too), teach yourself some skills and then go into wilderness.

Oh, and on ambitions: maaaan, again, try to make a mod once. Not a simple mod - something ambitious. Like a full-blown fortress with guards, quests and stuff. You'll see where it will lead. The game is extremely huge, especially for much smaller and less experienced Beth at the time. And consider this - at the beginning they were doing what Tamriel Rebuilt team will need about 3 or 4 more years to finish. They just had to stop the development instead of finishing it properly.

 

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