What games are you playing?

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Bit of a mixed bag for me at the moment. I'm currently putting a lot of time into Forza Horizon 4, but I'm also spending my Thursday evenings helping a few friends through the GTA:O Heists. As a bit of a change of pace I'm also re-running XCom2: War of the Chosen and Battlestar Gallactica: Deadlock. Of course, all of this is merely killing time until RDR2 is released in a few weeks.

Really into Labyrinth of Refrain right now...

Holy shit. That plot touches on things I was not expecting it to and I love it because it's not being at all gratuitous with the subjects that come up in it. I really like when plots just let things happen in it and neither wallow in them nor dismiss them.

Most recently found myself playing the hell out of MGSV: TPP now and loving it more than ever. Imo this is game progression done right, because it is set up logically and yields rewards exponentially. The more you develop, the more effective and efficient your staff gets, leading to much better gear development in much less time. Also, your core abilities and stats as a long-established soldier don't start at zero because "reasons" like so many other games series (The Witcher, God of War, Arkham games, etc.). I'm itching to develop a new arm that has enhanced healing properties and am most curious about how the rocket and sprinting enhancements work for another. Even the travel time is further alleviated via the delivery points, which require the invoice before being able to use them.

Sure it still has that traditional brand of whackiness the series is known for, but it's also a clever take on a formula that was running a bit too lean over time. I also like the idea of replaying individual missions within a larger game world as I see fit, with the overal story arc playing out in the background. If offers the best of both worlds in that you have the element of experiencing the story, but don't have to go through the whole thing again if you don't want to. It's one big play through with the freedom to replay bits and pieces in a more natural way by deploying on dedicated missions, or just roaming the landscape until you run into one.

There is too much to get into of course, and I haven't even finished half the main missions yet apparently as I still don't have the option to develop a nuke. I like that the gameplay took front stage over the story here, because it gives the impression of your actions having more direct effects on events surrounding you during general play, and there are a hell of a lot of ways to play. It's the kind of game where even the most trivial aspects could be entertaining. Listening to tapes found in the field while curating your base and mission details for example, or just taking a stroll to the hangar to see how development is going on a new bipedal tank after some target practice. There is always a change of pace available.

hanselthecaretaker:
Most recently found myself playing the hell out of MGSV: TPP

I started that on PS4. I got through the hospital stuff and it has been very good so far.

My ADD. Jumped over to Zelda BOTW on Wii U. More relaxing that MGS games. I'm just kind of exploring so far. Interesting mechanic that my stuff, so far, breaks after only a few uses. Changes the game play a lot. Other games, like Witcher have things break down but nothing like this.

Gorfias:

hanselthecaretaker:
Most recently found myself playing the hell out of MGSV: TPP

I started that on PS4. I got through the hospital stuff and it has been very good so far.

My ADD. Jumped over to Zelda BOTW on Wii U. More relaxing that MGS games. I'm just kind of exploring so far. Interesting mechanic that my stuff, so far, breaks after only a few uses. Changes the game play a lot. Other games, like Witcher have things break down but nothing like this.

Haven't played the new Zelda, but The Witcher 3 I'm level 10 or 11 in now. I love the sense of discovery and exploration to be had by traveling the landscape in between quests, but even this gem has been overshadowed personally by MGSV. The hospital prologue is entertaining but a bit of a false flag. Once you hit Afghanistan MGSV proper is like a rabbit hole of possibilities. I've only skimmed the surface of FOB stuff, but have a pretty good handle on the main base activities. There is a pretty steady flow of developments now, especially with all the resource containers I've been extracting.

Gorfias:

hanselthecaretaker:
Most recently found myself playing the hell out of MGSV: TPP

I started that on PS4. I got through the hospital stuff and it has been very good so far.

My ADD. Jumped over to Zelda BOTW on Wii U. More relaxing that MGS games. I'm just kind of exploring so far. Interesting mechanic that my stuff, so far, breaks after only a few uses. Changes the game play a lot. Other games, like Witcher have things break down but nothing like this.

What's your route been so far? You go N,S,E,W from the plateau?

@ Cynical Optimist:
I went a bit straight and took a right out of the Plaeau. I got to a temple with little statue people around a larger statue and prayed there. Killed some monsters. Got some bow and arrows. Shot down some honeycomb.
When I use a stick to kill a monster, it typically MIGHT last the entire encounter.
Any repair people that can fix things?
Very early into it but loving it.

I'm curious about weapon durability in BotW. All I've heard is that stuff breaks all the time, but never more specifically what that stuff really is.

Like, is it a bunch of random scrub weapons that you scavenge from where/whoever, or is even the Master Sword itself this bloody vulnerable?

My point is, there's got to be a limit to the breadth of fragility, no?

@hanselthecaretaker
Yes, although you don't lose the Master Sword, it becomes unusable for a while after 30 swings (60 if there is corruption nearby) and it has to recover itself. Any other weapon and shield you scavenged/found in a chest/bought/stole is gone forever after breaking. The good news is that there is an abundance of weapons to scavenge/find/buy/steal and armed enemies respawn periodically (so there is an infinite supply of weapons).

hanselthecaretaker:
I?m curious about weapon durability in BotW. All I?ve heard is that stuff breaks all the time, but never more specifically what that stuff really is.

Like, is it a bunch of random scrub weapons that you scavenge from where/whoever, or is even the Master Sword itself this bloody vulnerable?

My point is, there?s got to be a limit to the breadth of fragility, no?

Not ostensibly. It takes a while to get the Master Sword. Even then, it takes awhile for it to reform and chews up an entire slot. My advice is to use your first seeds only to level up weapon slots. The sooner you build an arsenal of melee weapons, the better.

Essentially more often than not the weapons are scaled to the enemies you're fighting, which is the good thing. So assuming you have that arsenal to begin with, you'll get more weapons as you target appropriate enemies. Basically the game forces you to make the most efficient use of your weapons, and to instinctually plan when to snatch the enemy's once you dispatch or disarm them.

Weapons have various perks that raise their damage, or grant special qualities like heightened durability .... which is pretty much as it sounds. And there are visual cues and from memory you'll know when to discard a weapon.

There arealso places in the world where you can just find decent weapons lying about. Like whith a reforged Master Sword and a quick traipse through Hyrule Castle you'll end up with some decent Hylian and Sheikah weapons you can use.

You can also create them later on at Robbie's laboratory.

CaitSeith:
@hanselthecaretaker
Yes, although you don't lose the Master Sword, it becomes unusable for a while after 30 swings (60 if there is corruption nearby) and it has to recover itself. Any other weapon and shield you scavenged/found in a chest/bought/stole is gone forever after breaking. The good news is that there is an abundance of weapons to scavenge/find/buy/steal and armed enemies respawn periodically (so there is an infinite supply of weapons).

Addendum_Forthcoming:

hanselthecaretaker:
I?m curious about weapon durability in BotW. All I?ve heard is that stuff breaks all the time, but never more specifically what that stuff really is.

Like, is it a bunch of random scrub weapons that you scavenge from where/whoever, or is even the Master Sword itself this bloody vulnerable?

My point is, there?s got to be a limit to the breadth of fragility, no?

Not ostensibly. It takes a while to get the Master Sword. Even then, it takes awhile for it to reform and chews up an entire slot. My advice is to use your first seeds only to level up weapon slots. The sooner you build an arsenal of melee weapons, the better.

Essentially more often than not the weapons are scaled to the enemies you're fighting, which is the good thing. So assuming you have that arsenal to begin with, you'll get more weapons as you target appropriate enemies. Basically the game forces you to make the most efficient use of your weapons, and to instinctually plan when to snatch the enemy's once you dispatch or disarm them.

Weapons have various perks that raise their damage, or grant special qualities like heightened durability .... which is pretty much as it sounds. And there are visual cues and from memory you'll know when to discard a weapon.

There arealso places in the world where you can just find decent weapons lying about. Like whith a reforged Master Sword and a quick traipse through Hyrule Castle you'll end up with some decent Hylian and Sheikah weapons you can use.

You can also create them later on at Robbie's laboratory.

So scavenging is an exceptionally vital part of the gameplay loop it seems. On one hand I can see how it builds a bit of strategy, but on the other it sounds a bit, well, too busy for the sake of it? Or at the very least detracting from the sense of adventure and valuable item discovery that Zelda games are traditionally known for. If I'm constantly playing musical weapons it also makes it tough to form a bond with any of them.

Maybe I've got too much SoulsBorne on the brain. From the sounds of some of the other gameplay mechanics like cooking, climbing, gliding, harnessing the elements, etc. it could more than compensate for that tedium.

hanselthecaretaker:

So scavenging is an exceptionally vital part of the gameplay loop it seems. On one hand I can see how it builds a bit of strategy, but on the other it sounds a bit, well, too busy for the sake of it? Or at the very least detracting from the sense of adventure and valuable item discovery that Zelda games are traditionally known for. If I?m constantly playing musical weapons it also makes it tough to form a bond with any of them.

Maybe I?ve got too much SoulsBorne on the brain. From the sounds of some of the other gameplay mechanics like cooking, climbing, gliding, harnessing the elements, etc. it could more than compensate for that tedium.

I used to think it was pretty tedious early game, but once you get past the plateau the biggest problem I had with weapons was not their durability, it was how they scaled and how the damage system works. It was utterly borked. Basically the biggest challenge comkes from choosing not to wear good armour.

All in all BTOW's combat system is pretty fucking fun. And it's fun in ways that it's not just a diverse set of weapons with amazing versatility and qualities ... but how the environment works in tandem with it. Like you can be a massive troll, and use shock arrows in a storm to attract lightning and take out a group of them. Doesn't always work, hilarious when it does.

I love Soulsborne combat, but then again it's a different game to BOTW and it's unfair to compare it in the same way it's not a meaningful comparison to compare Warriors combat systems with a side-scrolling beat 'em up. There's stuff you simply can't do in Soulsborne than you can in BOTW.... though Soulsborne games at least get the fucking damage systems right.

I would say by the time you get off the plateau and get to experience the bewildering array of different weapons out there that BotW's durability mechanic actually begins to click.

It makes sense why they did it, and it truly feels amazing to toss your near broken breatsword in a monster's face, leap over to collect their spear, dodge out of the way at the perfect moment and perform a flurry attack. Because every weapon handles differently, the true master of the game is going to be the one that plans out how they'll dish out the hurt, and pre planning just what to do when they collect the enemy's weapon prior getting into combat itself ...

In Bloodborne it is practically hardwired into the game that every weapon is viable from start to finish. In BotW ... every type of weapon is viable from start to finish, but its viability demands that you learn how to use each and every weapon type.

It's like ... Soulsborne is kind of like Star Wars lightsabers compared to BotW's Jackie Chan and how he uses his environment. Jackie Chan turns absolutely everything, the environment itself, into a weapon that he fluidly uses in his choreography. Soulsborne is more like some dedicated duel where the weapon you use is ostensibly whatever you're most comfortable with.

So I would say BotW does adventure better than Soulsborne due to its durability system... and arguably it even does traditional action better becuse the game punishes you for not familiarizing yourself with every weapon and monster type.

In Breath of the Wild the combat is faster and frenetic, using multiple weapon types and instinctually knowing when to throw a weapon into an enemy's face to collect theirs to attack with it in turn. And when you pull off the perfect string of combos, and weapon changeouts wjhen attacking a large group of enemies untouched ... BotW feels amazing.

Particularly when you've manipulated the environment itself to attack your enemies.

Addendum_Forthcoming:

hanselthecaretaker:

So scavenging is an exceptionally vital part of the gameplay loop it seems. On one hand I can see how it builds a bit of strategy, but on the other it sounds a bit, well, too busy for the sake of it? Or at the very least detracting from the sense of adventure and valuable item discovery that Zelda games are traditionally known for. If I?m constantly playing musical weapons it also makes it tough to form a bond with any of them.

Maybe I?ve got too much SoulsBorne on the brain. From the sounds of some of the other gameplay mechanics like cooking, climbing, gliding, harnessing the elements, etc. it could more than compensate for that tedium.

I used to think it was pretty tedious early game, but once you get past the plateau the biggest problem I had with weapons was not their durability, it was how they scaled and how the damage system works. It was utterly borked. Basically the biggest challenge comkes from choosing not to wear good armour.

All in all BTOW's combat system is pretty fucking fun. And it's fun in ways that it's not just a diverse set of weapons with amazing versatility and qualities ... but how the environment works in tandem with it. Like you can be a massive troll, and use shock arrows in a storm to attract lightning and take out a group of them. Doesn't always work, hilarious when it does.

I love Soulsborne combat, but then again it's a different game to BOTW and it's unfair to compare it in the same way it's not a meaningful comparison to compare Warriors combat systems with a side-scrolling beat 'em up. There's stuff you simply can't do in Soulsborne than you can in BOTW.... though Soulsborne games at least get the fucking damage systems right.

I would say by the time you get off the plateau and get to experience the bewildering array of different weapons out there that BotW's durability mechanic actually begins to click.

It makes sense why they did it, and it truly feels amazing to toss your near broken breatsword in a monster's face, leap over to collect their spear, dodge out of the way at the perfect moment and perform a flurry attack. Because every weapon handles differently, the true master of the game is going to be the one that plans out how they'll dish out the hurt, and pre planning just what to do when they collect the enemy's weapon prior getting into combat itself ...

In Bloodborne it is practically hardwired into the game that every weapon is viable from start to finish. In BotW ... every type of weapon is viable from start to finish, but its viability demands that you learn how to use each and every weapon type.

It's like ... Soulsborne is kind of like Star Wars lightsabers compared to BotW's Jackie Chan and how he uses his environment. Jackie Chan turns absolutely everything, the environment itself, into a weapon that he fluidly uses in his choreography. Soulsborne is more like some dedicated duel where the weapon you use is ostensibly whatever you're most comfortable with.

So I would say BotW does adventure better than Soulsborne due to its durability system... and arguably it even does traditional action better becuse the game punishes you for not familiarizing yourself with every weapon and monster type.

In Breath of the Wild the combat is faster and frenetic, using multiple weapon types and instinctually knowing when to throw a weapon into an enemy's face to collect theirs to attack with it in turn. And when you pull off the perfect string of combos, and weapon changeouts wjhen attacking a large group of enemies untouched ... BotW feels amazing.

Particularly when you've manipulated the environment itself to attack your enemies.

Well shit. I guess this is why I should never doubt Nintendo when it comes to game design; at least on the whole.

Am doing the Hollow Knight. And am relieved to say it's all quite wonderful really, except those moments I'm swearing at the screen. Or am I merely swearing at my own incompetence? Could be both, as am mostly shit at games. Was growing quite self-conscious that if I didn't love too many of the popular things lately, it would come off as just trying to be contrarian, so when praise started heaping up on this, I did worry about becoming disappointed, then compulsively blurting that disappointment to something other than the nearest mildew-covered wall or confuddled unfed cat.

Have to say, making the arthropod world plushy-friendly is a charming achievement in of itself. And the platforming that could easily have becoming a fiddly nightmare is actually tight with pleasant feedback. Love the detailed art in the world and the addictive exploration entwines with it well.

hanselthecaretaker:

Well shit. I guess this is why I should never doubt Nintendo when it comes to game design; at least on the whole.

If Zelda fixed its healing and damage mechanics, it would merited crazy-stupid good praise. It nails feel and tone. Like ... it's a post-apocalypse you can get legitimately lost in. A world of majestic little secrets everywhere. And it just nails that feel of 'beautifully sombre'.

And all these little nuances of people that legitimately feel like they're simply just trying to make the best of a deteriorating situation...

If they could have married that exploration, that tone, that feel and combine it with better healing and damage mechanics it wouldbe a 10/10 for me. Just the best game you could have in that genre. If only Nintendo released .... I don't know, some form of patched or mechanic where damage and armur didn't just negate eachother, but you have weapon damage and armour as if maybe a percentage as opposed to a fixed value that simply directly negates that damage value, and limited healing items to once per minute ... that would perfect.

It's really weird that they went with the damage system they did.

So it has major flaws. But at its core it's a phenomenally well put together game. Just ... you know, flaws. And its only a handful of flaws ... but they're there and they're pretty big ones.

Addendum_Forthcoming:

hanselthecaretaker:

Well shit. I guess this is why I should never doubt Nintendo when it comes to game design; at least on the whole.

If Zelda fixed its healing and damage mechanics, it would merited crazy-stupid good praise. It nails feel and tone. Like ... it's a post-apocalypse you can get legitimately lost in. A world of majestic little secrets everywhere. And it just nails that feel of 'beautifully sombre'.

And all these little nuances of people that legitimately feel like they're simply just trying to make the best of a deteriorating situation...

If they could have married that exploration, that tone, that feel and combine it with better healing and damage mechanics it wouldbe a 10/10 for me. Just the best game you could have in that genre. If only Nintendo released .... I don't know, some form of patched or mechanic where damage and armur didn't just negate eachother, but you have weapon damage and armour as if maybe a percentage as opposed to a fixed value that simply directly negates that damage value, and limited healing items to once per minute ... that would perfect.

It's really weird that they went with the damage system they did.

So it has major flaws. But at its core it's a phenomenally well put together game. Just ... you know, flaws. And its only a handful of flaws ... but they're there and they're pretty big ones.

In those cases it would be a boon to console gaming if user feedback was taken into greater consideration for game updates. Like with all the data collecting companies do, maybe establishing a patching framework weighted towards hours a user puts into a game and the stronger a consensus there is on what needs to be fixed, it gets fixed. PC gaming is great for this via the modding community itself, but imagine if that was coupled with the official support of the development team. You'd think it would be a good recruiting strategy for some of these companies.

Anyways, dammit...with such descriptive praise I'm really considering getting a Switch now, but wondering if I should wait for the inevitable upgraded model. Also never played Twilight Princess or Skyward Sword yet either.

I'm some 24hrs into the new Assassins's Creed Odyssey game and I'm loving it. I don't get why everyone says there's tons of grind, I'm leveling up left and right! I'm on roughly lvl25-26, so that's a little more than 1 hour per level, and that's way faster than Diablo or WOW ever was. Shit that's like 2 story missions and 2 contract or side-quest missions per level. That's not grind, that's the game!
The only thing that's annoying is that through the main story and a few side quests I've gotten dozens of quest. One quest was just 'go kill 6 different monsters, each ten levels higher than the last, and it'll take you all game and your quest box is filled with half a dozen quests you're too low level for'
and then I got one or two more like that and my quest box is just swamped with high level quests. Current level quests are fine, and there's no real grind. Just the game to play.

My gaming PC, sadly, is on life support and may never come back. :( Thus, my PS3 has gone back to being the main game machine in the house instead of just the Netflix machine, and I'm using the chance to play some titles I never got around to, starting with Stick of Truth.

My backup PC can still do a few games too, though, so I'm getting in some Streets of Rage Remake when Netflix or Food Network takes priority on the tv.

Fist of the Northstar: Lost Paradise - The best 3D FotN game ever made. A million times better than those Dynasty Warriors spin-off games.

House of the Dead: Overkill - I finally played this for the first time a couple of weeks ago, and it is hilarious. The reason why I did not get this when it first launched was because I felt it was too short for $50. I kept telling myself to get it when the price dropped, but I was constantly putting it off. The humor is on point and funny, and aruuably has the best story out of any HotD game. I still stand by what I said, as this game should have been around the $35-40 mark.

Going through the post-game content in Super Mario Odyssey (and, holy crap! It's a lot). I mastered a couple of pretty useful jump combos that make navigating through the worlds much faster through shortcuts I never realized I could take before (it also makes the Koopa Freerunning Races a lot easier, even the Master Cups).

Silentpony:
I'm some 24hrs into the new Assassins's Creed Odyssey game and I'm loving it. I don't get why everyone says there's tons of grind, I'm leveling up left and right! I'm on roughly lvl25-26, so that's a little more than 1 hour per level, and that's way faster than Diablo or WOW ever was. Shit that's like 2 story missions and 2 contract or side-quest missions per level. That's not grind, that's the game!
The only thing that's annoying is that through the main story and a few side quests I've gotten dozens of quest. One quest was just 'go kill 6 different monsters, each ten levels higher than the last, and it'll take you all game and your quest box is filled with half a dozen quests you're too low level for'
and then I got one or two more like that and my quest box is just swamped with high level quests. Current level quests are fine, and there's no real grind. Just the game to play.

Really depends on the quality of the content and how its distributed.

I mean, Origins wasn't lacking for quests to do, but they started getting spread pretty thin on the effort level in the middle sections of the game, getting into very mediocre tasks, or reusing the same location half a dozen times.

Which is fine in your open world, you can have the meat largely centered around the mainline story with less substance in the background world. But with the level systems they had in the game, you had to slog around in that mid-tier stuff in between the more consistent parts.

The most recent Destiny expansion would be another case. It has a lot of stuttering in the level curves even in the main storyline quests. And the second half (post-story or whatever) is right off the rails with slogging through repeat content for ages to get back on to things (exacerbated by the godawful mess that is Destiny's (attempt at a) levelling system)

Seth Carter:

Silentpony:
I'm some 24hrs into the new Assassins's Creed Odyssey game and I'm loving it. I don't get why everyone says there's tons of grind, I'm leveling up left and right! I'm on roughly lvl25-26, so that's a little more than 1 hour per level, and that's way faster than Diablo or WOW ever was. Shit that's like 2 story missions and 2 contract or side-quest missions per level. That's not grind, that's the game!
The only thing that's annoying is that through the main story and a few side quests I've gotten dozens of quest. One quest was just 'go kill 6 different monsters, each ten levels higher than the last, and it'll take you all game and your quest box is filled with half a dozen quests you're too low level for'
and then I got one or two more like that and my quest box is just swamped with high level quests. Current level quests are fine, and there's no real grind. Just the game to play.

Really depends on the quality of the content and how its distributed.

I mean, Origins wasn't lacking for quests to do, but they started getting spread pretty thin on the effort level in the middle sections of the game, getting into very mediocre tasks, or reusing the same location half a dozen times.

Which is fine in your open world, you can have the meat largely centered around the mainline story with less substance in the background world. But with the level systems they had in the game, you had to slog around in that mid-tier stuff in between the more consistent parts.

The most recent Destiny expansion would be another case. It has a lot of stuttering in the level curves even in the main storyline quests. And the second half (post-story or whatever) is right off the rails with slogging through repeat content for ages to get back on to things (exacerbated by the godawful mess that is Destiny's (attempt at a) levelling system)

See I'm a big fan of Homer's Epics so all the 'grinding' works great for me. Because its just part of the hero's story, and I don't see it as grinding. Besides if you explore the countryside you can find small side quests without having to go to the notice board for endless 'kill the bandit' quests

Right now I am playing:

1. Wandersong - Very good game so far with a lot of variety which you can do with your singing. Also the characters are well developed.
2. Sea Bed - A Yuri VN which even if sometimes is boring as fuck, it have a nice mystery for a drama theme story.
3. Neighbor - A Horror VN which I think is very short. After 2 hours I already know the main mystery of the game.
4. Lucy Got Problems - An Erotic VN which surprisingly it have a lot of choices to make.

Plans to play next:

1. UnderHero.
2. CrossCode.
3. God's Basement.
4. The Hex.
5. Oppai Caf? ~Oyako de Cos Chichi~
6. Magikiras

CaitSeith:
Going through the post-game content in Super Mario Odyssey (and, holy crap! It's a lot). I mastered a couple of pretty useful jump combos that make navigating through the worlds much faster through shortcuts I never realized I could take before (it also makes the Koopa Freerunning Races a lot easier, even the Master Cups).

The throw hat jump was tricky at first but super helpful. I got down to the last ten stars before getting sick and tired of it.

Currently playing Valkyria Chronicles 4, interspersed with the occassional session of OneShot. Having a good time. Oh, and still playing Monster Hunter World whenever my mates are on and they're not playing codblops4.

Might pick up either Timespinners or Donut Country on of these days.

I tried Friday the 13th since it's a free download on PSN this month. I only had time for a few minutes, playing as a counselor. Aside from getting used to the stiff, budget-feeling controls and awkward contextual icon interactions the game seems to succeed on building tension, especially if you're stranded from the other counselors. They've also done a great job recreating the atmosphere from the movies, and perhaps even surpassing it due to the interaction of the game medium.

I've heard playing as Jason is more fun, but I don't think that's entirely true. More empowering perhaps, but being scared shitless is kinda the point of the game too.

Resident Evil 4 got the sudden urge to play it again and decided this time I was gonna do it all Story, Professional mode and conquer mercenaries for the hand cannon.

Mercenaries is proving to be a nightmare, just got done with Leon on all 4 maps.

Also Playing Pokemon Ultra moon, post game game training, breeding eggs, shiny hunting and attempts to conquer the battle tree, highest streak is 37 sometimes I feel the game will just give you the worlds shortest straw and you will come across that one team that just counters yours completely.

Finishing up Assassins Creed: Syndicate. Main story is done and I'm finishing up the interesting side missions before I finish up with the Jack the Ripper DLC.

It's wierd that I did enjoy it like I've enjoyed most of this series(except Unity which I still can't bring myself to buy, no matter how cheap it gets) but it also feels so incredibly....Safe. It pretends to have commentary on Capitalism and the Gilded Age but then tiptoes around it in the most inoffensive way possible, settling on evil, bland industrialists and pretty much nothing beyond that. They took the City conquest mechanic they've already used in half the series and tweaked it. The Frye Twins are mostly likeable but not terribly interesting, other then having daddy issues they keep bringing up(wait, that's not interesting either). I can only remember 3 of the Villians: Starrick(for being in all the cutscenes twirling his mustache and pretending he's Bill the Butcher from Gangs of New York), Lucy(for being the Dragon and the sole lady in the top hierarchy) and Max Roth, who honestly was far more interesting then most of the characters in the story and really needed to be in the game a lot more. Hell, an AC game playing as Max Roth would be fancinating.

London is beautiful in all it's stinky, industrial age glory and the grappling hook is fun to play with(and almost makes the game too easy because it's so easy to escape from any trouble) but I honestly can't remember most of the plot despite having just played it, that's how generic it feels(I can remember big chunks of AC2,AC3 and AC4 though). I just remember the big assassination missions, because those feel like they had real effort put into them.

I was playing Valkyria Chronicles 4, which I adore. I was a little disappointed to find it was a lot like the original, but then my brain told me to shut up, this was the sequel I had been after for years. It's a bit slow to begin with, like I said in the VC4 thread, but then The Siegval Line happened and blew me away.

I was happy playing my way through that, but then my brother got me Spider-Man for my birthday. What a twat right? (Not really bro, not that you would see this). So I decided to stock that on and that has kept me addicted for the last couple of weeks. The combat takes some getting used to, it's not as polished as the Arkham games and Spider-Man spent a lot of time face planting into walls. But it's good fun. A couple of missions have got on my nerves, the save the fish and catch the pigeons ones come to mind, but I'm still having fun. The game kind of reminds me of iNFamous with the way that the game is paced for some reason. Maybe its because in the first part of the game you are fighting nothing but grunts and then after a certain point they are tougher and I imagine in the final third they will be tougher still. I know this sounds like every game ever, but if you've played iNFamous then you should know what I mean.

The other thing I noticed is that Spider-Man straight up murders people. People bitch and moan about Nathan Drake pulling that one guard off the roof, despite the fact that the guard can be seen swimming away to safety afterwards. In this, you can melee people off of a building or hit them with an area of attack move and they will go flying off the building. Sometimes Spider-Man will stick the falling enemy to the building, but most of the time they just plummet to their deaths. And no one mentions this, not even Jamison. That's not to mention his stealth move when he smashes the goons skull against a steel beam to knock them out. Tell me they are walking away after that.

Anyway, Red Dead 2 is out next week and I'm thinking about not getting it. I have enough to play at the moment thanks.

For such a high profile game like Red Dead: Redemption 2, it's kinda baffling why the reviews are embargoed til the day before release.

Oh well, everyone knows it'll have a 95+ Meta regardless.

Assassin's Creed Rogue. I've owned the game on PC for about 2 years now and just never started playing it until a few days ago and I'm really enjoying it so far. After I finish AC: Rogue I plan to start playing Rise of the Tomb Raider which is another game I've owned for about a year now and haven't played yet.

So, I reached the third post-game world (called the Darker Side) in Super Mario Odyssey and got my ass handed to me. I got so frustrated that I just rage quit the game and put some Dark Souls instead. So, yeah. Now I?m playing Dark Souls on the Switch.

If you didn't already, try it - give Pathfinder: kingmaker a chance (2nd chance, at launch was buuuuuuuugy as hell).
The game is absolutely amazing. Feels like good old times of original Baldur's Gate and Fallout, dam' I'd even say it has Betrayal at Krondor tinge (book chapters). Simply exquisite.

Soulcalibur 6. Which is now an odd mix of a fighting game and JRPG (there is still just the regular fighting game modes of course).

Which has been entertaining thus far (up to chapter 3 of the create-a-character campaign, haven't tried out the story mode with the general characters because the tutorial was in the custom one). Though I have no idea what half the stats on my gear are.

Replayed Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag to 100% main missions, now I'm screwing about on multiplayer.

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