What games are you playing?

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Silvanus:
Recently finished & platinumed Spiderman (PS4) and the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney trilogy.

Also went back to complete a bunch of old NES games I hadn't played before: Zelda II and Kirby's Adventure. Goddamn, Zelda II is obtuse and difficult. Would've lost my mind without a walkthrough.

Kirby's Adventure was a delight though.

Zelda 2 is weirdly a lot like Castlevania 2 and Final Fantasy 2, all sequels that tried doing something different and ambitious and just couldn't pull it off.

Dalisclock:

Silvanus:
Recently finished & platinumed Spiderman (PS4) and the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney trilogy.

Also went back to complete a bunch of old NES games I hadn't played before: Zelda II and Kirby's Adventure. Goddamn, Zelda II is obtuse and difficult. Would've lost my mind without a walkthrough.

Kirby's Adventure was a delight though.

Zelda 2 is weirdly a lot like Castlevania 2 and Final Fantasy 2, all sequels that tried doing something different and ambitious and just couldn't pull it off.

Might as well throw Mario 2 in there as well. Also funny how all four of these series were massively redeemed with their third iterations, especially in Zelda's case. Oddly enough it kinda did the same thing as Castlevania IIRC, which was a finer-tuned, enhanced reimagining of the original game.

Silvanus:
Recently finished & platinumed Spiderman (PS4) and the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney trilogy.

Also went back to complete a bunch of old NES games I hadn't played before: Zelda II and Kirby's Adventure. Goddamn, Zelda II is obtuse and difficult. Would've lost my mind without a walkthrough.

Kirby's Adventure was a delight though.

Kirby's Adventure was actually one of the first games I ever beat as a kid. For an NES game it really holds up imo.

hanselthecaretaker:

Dalisclock:

Silvanus:
Recently finished & platinumed Spiderman (PS4) and the Phoenix Wright: Ace Attorney trilogy.

Also went back to complete a bunch of old NES games I hadn't played before: Zelda II and Kirby's Adventure. Goddamn, Zelda II is obtuse and difficult. Would've lost my mind without a walkthrough.

Kirby's Adventure was a delight though.

Zelda 2 is weirdly a lot like Castlevania 2 and Final Fantasy 2, all sequels that tried doing something different and ambitious and just couldn't pull it off.

Might as well throw Mario 2 in there as well. Also funny how all four of these series were massively redeemed with their third iterations, especially in Zelda?s case. Oddly enough it kinda did the same thing as Castlevania IIRC, which was a finer-tuned, enhanced reimagining of the original game.

Matio 2 is a wierd case though, because what was released in the US as Mario 2 was essentially another game that got reskinned and renammed by Nintendo because the Japanese version of Mario 2 was much closer to the first game(to the point of feeling like an expansion rather then a sequel) and apparently much harder.

So yeah. Kinda like why I didn't mention Snakes Revenge as a sequel to Metal Gear, though in that case because Snakes Revenge isn't canon.

Weras, to the best of my knowledge, the other games were meant to be the sequels.

Outward. Still not entirely sold on it gameplay wise. Its definitely trying to do some ambitious things though.

Which is to say I got out of the prologue, walked outside and was immediately trounced and "killed" by a random bandit, and now I'm locked up in a bandit camp. While trying to find or craft a fishing spear.

Sill playing Dauntless too. Solid game really. I'd give them money if the monetization wasn't just literally garbage. Colours for armour that doesn't color well or has limited dye spots making it impossible to actually look decent. Basically irrelevant emotes. Skins that are useless because you have to buy separate orbs each time you want to use one. Actual pay-to-skip stuff which is worthless to people who want to actually play the game. Or the battle pass thing that's mostly just rewarding you a motley mix of the same stuff with more effort involved.

Like an old lover that always haunts, I'm once again playing GZDoom, mainly the redux of my favorite megawad Extermination Day with Brutal V21, but equal time to Doom Tribute project which is a simpler (but still enhanced) revisit of the Doom and Doom2 levels all in one.

City of Brass

Its a rogue like, so only buy if you like repetition. Like a FPS Rogue Legacy but now with whips. Aesthetic is nice but it's just the same for 13 levels.

I'll play it for a few more hours but i think ive seen all I need here.

Free peggle phone vs paid peggle console...why is the paid version the one with the least content, challenge and variety? Getting some real cynical vibes off this, considering the phone version is the only one with a life system that is directly tied to microtransactions. Feeling pretty shortchanged on knowing I could've paid nothing and stuck with a far more complete experience. Sort of.

The Soulsy intuition I've accrued over the last few games served me well last night in Dark Souls 3. I had hit a progression roadblock after the Deep and the only hint I allowed myself was "ladder to swamp". So I figured, what area was already kinda swampy that might lead to more swampiness? Headed to Crucifixion Woods and after some exploring noticed a staircase I never had prior, which led to that much sought after ladder.

Farron Keep is apparently DS3's version of Blighttown and Black Gulch rolled into something ironically more uplifting and aesthetically brighter, considering the game's theme of everything fading away. Got cursed a couple times on my way to lighting one of three flames which undoubtedly leads to something Anor Londo-ish if I'm being presumptive enough. Level 33 now, and it seems tougher to come by than past games, but so far isn't really all that critical in terms of alleviating difficulty. I've played to the Sunken Valley area of Sekiro so it's interesting going back to Souls.

Barring the deflection mechanic and traversal options of the former I'm still digging the feel of DS3. It's still quick, and often more varied with how you can defeat enemies, as well as having more effective supplemental goodies. Plus there are certain mere random enemies that scare the hell outta me in a way that even the giant snake in Sekiro didn't. There is an added feeling of vulnerability in Souls which the limited mobility and stamina system provoke which makes the push and pull of tension and relief more pronounced.

Finally got around to watching the Digimon Cri movies (whoever named them tri was a dirty dirty deceiver) so I'm in full hype mode and what better to do than get into the Cyber Sleuth games! I had them in my backlog for a long while, always wanting for time. Well, it is sure as hell time right now haha. Super excited. I hope Impmon has some role to play as he's a personal fav of mine.

Also recently beat Mad Max, or at least the main story and camps/strongholds. Really wanted to be able to choose running off with Hope and Glory but alas, scripting led me down a tragic path. The core gameplay is fun enough that I didn't feel much open world fatigue, and it's still fun to bang about in due to the awesome physics and presentation, but those collectible scrap icons are far past nauseating to see on the map.

The stupid minefields are even worse, considering the dog can only fit in one of the shittiest cars that you can't even use for fast travel, and getting him to find the mines while randomly driving over swaths of terrain is an exercise in insanity. It'd be nice to have a mod that just collected any mine you happened to drive past in any vehicle, because it's easily the worst part of the game.

Finally started playing The Division 2, and you know, its actually a lot of fun!

Wish I had some friends, though...

Finished my replay of Assassin's Creed 4: Black Flag. It really does hold up beautifully on a second go, and after playing it back to back with AC3(which seems thematically appropriate), there's a much better sense of AC4 just being a better game with much better pacing. With that being said, the tailing missions are still annoying and are used far too often(including ship tailing missions, for some reason) and for all the rot people see in the series now, a lot of it was already present in AC4(Beef gating, resource grinding for upgrades, pointless Modern Day antics), it's just not nearly noticeable among all the piratey action. There's also what feels like a mobile game integrated into the main game, a trading/combat game with ships you capture which has absurdly long mission complete times which require you to play every day to really get the most reward out of it.

It's certainly telling that in order to make the series feel fresh, they pretty much had to go with the story of a scoundrel who is mostly a pirate and for whom the whole assassin/templar conflict is just kind of there on the periphery that he kinda keeps bumbling in and out of. Hell, he got himself inducted into the templars almost by accident and survives as much as he does both through innate talent and a lot of luck, not because he has any idea what he's doing most of the time.

Unfortunately, it has the downside of introducing the idiotic Sage concept into the series, which would drive the next two games along with the Juno thing, in an arc that would get shuffled off to the comics for it's conclusions because nobody was really that interested and ubisoft doesn't know how to properly follow up on plot arcs.

Started replaying Bloodborne again.

I've been talking it up to a friend of mine at work for years now as being my favorite game of the generation. He finally decided to drop money on a PS4 Pro and bought Last of Us remastered, God of War, Bloodborne, and Spider-man on discount from the Sony sale.

He started Bloodborne and started asking me all sorts of questions about it, since it's his first From Software game and they're unintuitive as fuck when you first start out. It's been a few years since the last time I played it, so I decided to pop it back in and start playing again to make sure that I answered his questions accurately.

Man I absolutely love the atmosphere of this game, but after Sekiro even Bloodborne feels a little bit slow and clunky. I don't think I realized just how much faster and more mobile you are in Sekiro.

Just jumping and the removal of a stamina gauge to limit dashing/attacking change the pace completely. BB is fast compared to DS sure but compared to actual action games like DMC or bayonetta it's still slow and Sekiro is now among them as well.

Dirty Hipsters:
Started replaying Bloodborne again.

I've been talking it up to a friend of mine at work for years now as being my favorite game of the generation. He finally decided to drop money on a PS4 Pro and bought Last of Us remastered, God of War, Bloodborne, and Spider-man on discount from the Sony sale.

He started Bloodborne and started asking me all sorts of questions about it, since it's his first From Software game and they're unintuitive as fuck when you first start out. It's been a few years since the last time I played it, so I decided to pop it back in and start playing again to make sure that I answered his questions accurately.

Man I absolutely love the atmosphere of this game, but after Sekiro even Bloodborne feels a little bit slow and clunky. I don't think I realized just how much faster and more mobile you are in Sekiro.

DS3 also feels snappier than Bloodborne to me. The latter almost has a bit of a Gumby-ish feel to the dashes, like your character lurches about a bit. I like that kind of feedback and texture though as it gives the character some weight. DS3 is about as quick as I care for with this style of combat where physics and tactical feedback are a big part of the experience.

Sekiro's movement is almost like a mix of the two to me. He's quick with his sword and movements overall, but the animations can be very deliberate and exaggerated; especially with the grappling. Again, I appreciate these details as they go a long ways towards making characters feel like, well, actual characters.

I've gotten back into Mafia 3 now attempting to finish the story, and aside from the repetitive mission structure I'm digging the location and how well realized the characters are. Rockstar could really take some cues here on the combat for GTA too. While the search mode AI has the cognition of a gnat it's still fun stealthing around with various takedowns. There is a pleasing sense of progression to be had from building up territories and getting various perks to make life easier. Car physics are also handled quite well, falling somewhere between GTA4 & 5. There could really be more to pick from on the radio, but there probably wasn't much to pick from back then, either.

The story and seeing what happens to the various crime bosses is really the hook though. If it keeps holding my interest I might check out the dlc if it's ever on sale again. The official website had a play through suggestion with some nicely detailed bonus maps at the bottom. Love the detail they put in there. It makes me wonder how much better the game could?ve been if they had a smoother development cycle and more time.

Some developer insight, along with what went wrong and a nice write up giving praise where it is due to round things out.

In some ways I'd consider it an underrated game. They definitely nailed some key things like tone, story, and respecting then player's intelligence (barring the AI issues). Overall I'm finding it more playable than any GTA game at least, and more thoroughly entertaining than either of the previous Mafia games.

Playing Breath of the Wild on the Switch. I had forgotten how fragile you are at the beginning. I'm going to be busy for a while...

hanselthecaretaker:

Dirty Hipsters:
Started replaying Bloodborne again.

I've been talking it up to a friend of mine at work for years now as being my favorite game of the generation. He finally decided to drop money on a PS4 Pro and bought Last of Us remastered, God of War, Bloodborne, and Spider-man on discount from the Sony sale.

He started Bloodborne and started asking me all sorts of questions about it, since it's his first From Software game and they're unintuitive as fuck when you first start out. It's been a few years since the last time I played it, so I decided to pop it back in and start playing again to make sure that I answered his questions accurately.

Man I absolutely love the atmosphere of this game, but after Sekiro even Bloodborne feels a little bit slow and clunky. I don't think I realized just how much faster and more mobile you are in Sekiro.

DS3 also feels snappier than Bloodborne to me. The latter almost has a bit of a Gumby-ish feel to the dashes, like your character lurches about a bit. I like that kind of feedback and texture though as it gives the character some weight. DS3 is about as quick as I care for with this style of combat where physics and tactical feedback are a big part of the experience.

Sekiro?s movement is almost like a mix of the two to me. He?s quick with his sword and movements overall, but the animations can be very deliberate and exaggerated; especially with the grappling. Again, I appreciate these details as they go a long ways towards making characters feel like, well, actual characters.

For me the big thing is that in Sekiro you can animation cancel your attack with a block in the first few frames of the attack start up if you realize the attack is unsafe, and getting my muscle memory away from that is proving to be a little trickier than I anticipated. I'm also forgetting to take advantage of i-frames. The really unfortunate thing is that if I decide to go back to Sekiro and finish getting all the endings this will probably completely mess me up again.

Dirty Hipsters:

hanselthecaretaker:

Dirty Hipsters:
Started replaying Bloodborne again.

I've been talking it up to a friend of mine at work for years now as being my favorite game of the generation. He finally decided to drop money on a PS4 Pro and bought Last of Us remastered, God of War, Bloodborne, and Spider-man on discount from the Sony sale.

He started Bloodborne and started asking me all sorts of questions about it, since it's his first From Software game and they're unintuitive as fuck when you first start out. It's been a few years since the last time I played it, so I decided to pop it back in and start playing again to make sure that I answered his questions accurately.

Man I absolutely love the atmosphere of this game, but after Sekiro even Bloodborne feels a little bit slow and clunky. I don't think I realized just how much faster and more mobile you are in Sekiro.

DS3 also feels snappier than Bloodborne to me. The latter almost has a bit of a Gumby-ish feel to the dashes, like your character lurches about a bit. I like that kind of feedback and texture though as it gives the character some weight. DS3 is about as quick as I care for with this style of combat where physics and tactical feedback are a big part of the experience.

Sekiro?s movement is almost like a mix of the two to me. He?s quick with his sword and movements overall, but the animations can be very deliberate and exaggerated; especially with the grappling. Again, I appreciate these details as they go a long ways towards making characters feel like, well, actual characters.

For me the big thing is that in Sekiro you can animation cancel your attack with a block in the first few frames of the attack start up if you realize the attack is unsafe, and getting my muscle memory away from that is proving to be a little trickier than I anticipated. I'm also forgetting to take advantage of i-frames. The really unfortunate thing is that if I decide to go back to Sekiro and finish getting all the endings this will probably completely mess me up again.

Yeah, I forgot about cancels. They're a welcomed change though and again they fit the character of Sekiro's increased focus on action more than in SoulsBorne, where committing to attacks and watching stamina helped make them more than the average bear.

The feint is useful in various ways. You can do it preemptively to make an enemy whiff a parry attempt, not just last minute block an incoming attack.

Played and beat Watchdogs again recently. It's basically just as I remember it. The story is as boring as ever, but hacking someone's grenade to blow them up is always entertaining. Well, except when they throw it at a target that has to be kept alive. I had an okay time with it.

Now I'm on to Watchdogs 2 and I'm reminded why I dropped it after a few hours. It doesn't feel like anything in the game has any direction. While I don't mind the more lighthearted tone, even some of the main missions just feel like side missions. The game just feels a little too whimsical and like it's trying way too hard with the main cast.

I do like the greater options with hacking available in 2. The game got way too easy once I unlocked the ability to start gang wars, but maybe something down the line will balance it out. Otherwise, my answer to every problem is clear.

Captain Marvelous:
Played and beat Watchdogs again recently. It's basically just as I remember it. The story is as boring as ever, but hacking someone's grenade to blow them up is always entertaining. Well, except when they throw it at a target that has to be kept alive. I had an okay time with it.

Now I'm on to Watchdogs 2 and I'm reminded why I dropped it after a few hours. It doesn't feel like anything in the game has any direction. While I don't mind the more lighthearted tone, even some of the main missions just feel like side missions. The game just feels a little too whimsical and like it's trying way too hard with the main cast.

I do like the greater options with hacking available in 2. The game got way too easy once I unlocked the ability to start gang wars, but maybe something down the line will balance it out. Otherwise, my answer to every problem is clear.

WD2 really kind of smoothed out some rough edges and obviously made the hacking toybox a little more diverse. But yeah, it does seem to have come at a cost of uh, more or less any idea of level design or extensive sequences to utilize those elements within. Even some of the more interesting novelty stuff like using the drawbridges to jump ontop of the train in WD1 suffered, and most encounters are incredibly bite sized zones (that oft get reused for side content, or online co-op missions)

WD1 obvously has some glaring issues stemming from its apparent origin as a Driver game that got retooled into a franchise based on focus testing reception of the hacking gimmick or whatever. But by and large it has an obviously greater attention to craftmanship for a lot of the provided content. Where things feel designed and have purpose to them (even the characters outside of Aiden's bland monotone stereotype are generally pretty well done)

Just beat Baldur's Gate EE: Siege of Dragonspear. It was alright I suppose.

That said, that old controversy about the transgendered character? Yeah so, I didn't even realize I ever met the character, so I looked them up. I remember the character, but not them 'shoving their trannyness in my face'. For a supposed 'SJW Agenda' DLC, it did little in that, I mean unless they hate that there is a non-evil Goblin companion who honestly, was my favorite new character. M'Khiin was cool.

Anyways, need to go back and get all the achievements I missed, then move on to Baldur's Gate II EE. My hope is to finish that before BG3 comes out.

Captain Marvelous:
WD2 talk.

Yeah, I don't see there being a main mission in WD2. It's a bunch of side mission. They even do this with the team finale, where there is a combined but definitely separate effort. While I don't think this is great for cohesiveness, I think it was interesting way of approaching it. It's like an episodic game but the episodes run concurrently.

People are looking at WD: Legion and wondering how that's going to work. Id dare say, similar to the structure in WD2. For better or worse.

Saelune:
Just beat Baldur's Gate EE: Siege of Dragonspear. It was alright I suppose.

That said, that old controversy about the transgendered character? Yeah so, I didn't even realize I ever met the character, so I looked them up. I remember the character, but not them 'shoving their trannyness in my face'. For a supposed 'SJW Agenda' DLC, it did little in that, I mean unless they hate that there is a non-evil Goblin companion who honestly, was my favorite new character. M'Khiin was cool.

Anyways, need to go back and get all the achievements I missed, then move on to Baldur's Gate II EE. My hope is to finish that before BG3 comes out.

That's all I remember hearing about game was the Trans "controversy". I honestly don't know anything about it beyond that and the fact it's a piece of Balders game made 2 decades after the main game.

If I ever replay Balders gate, maybe I'll try it. Then again, my CRPG backlog is awful right now since I want to play Pillars of Eternity 1+2 and Divinity Original Sin 1+2.

The Monster Hunter expansion has its Beta running now on the PS4, so checking that out. You don't need the base game to play the beta/demo either, if anything was looking to try it out. I already pre-ordered mine, but its nice to drop in and get the old hunt on again (and will no doubt be entirely unhelpful in getting further in Dauntless afterward)

Picked up Underworld Ascendant (the 25 year later sequel to the Ultima Underworlds), but haven't had the opportunity to really delve into it as yet.

Outward continues to simultaneously be sort of annoying but ultimately also kind of challenge free, or at least penalty free. I may have to cave in and find some kind of combat guide, because despite the defensive play being Souls-style (which is to say, ludicrous iframe easy rolls), actually keeping your degrading stamina up long enough to kill an enemy back seems to be an oblique process.

I recently replayed Yoku's Island Express to get platinum trophy 21. Woo hoo! I would highly recommend this game to anyone who likes Metroidvanias and pinball. Its a cute little game that you can probably pick up really cheap now and will take you a good few hours to find everything.

I have been alternating between playing Uncharted 2 and Breath of the Wild. The difference between Uncharted 1 and 2 is quite noticeable. The combat is more fun than in the first game, it not throwing waves of enemies at you for each encounter. And everything feels a lot smoother and fluid now, the first game was a little clunky feeling in retrospect. The game is showing its age a bit, even in this re-released version, but it is still fun. However, I am finding it a bit easy on normal, I'm putting this down to getting the platinum trophy for the PS3 version. Or the fact that I have played it so many times. Maybe I ought to restart it on hard.

Breath of the Wild is still fun. The sense of scale and adventure is amazing, the whole "hey, what's that over there..." never gets old. Currently stuck on Death Mountain trying to get to the Divine Beast there, it would be easier if that stupid Goron didn't have to come with me or he could climb mountains. I'll figure it out.

Also, because I surprisingly had some money left over from the music festival I went to last weekend, I decided to buy myself the game I should have bought months ago. Resident Evil 2 Remake. I only started playing it last night, but so far so good. The main complaint has followed over from the demo is that Leon's gun has all the stopping power of a mouse flicking bogies. I feel safe in the knowledge that if I committed a crime in Racoon City and there wasn't a zombie apocalypse happening, I wouldn't have to worry about the police as their guns do nothing.

I imagine it'll look a bit like this:

But yeah, so far the game is good, its creepy and gross and the zombies actually feel like a threat again.

Trying to play Crash Team Racing: Nitro Fueled online. 90% of the time either everyone disconnects or the game freezes at the lobby. Hopefully they fix this soon.

Otherwise I'm just playing through adventure mode trying to unlock as much stuff as possible until online becomes stable.

I've been attempting to get 100% Gold challenge completion in Dead Rising 2 Off The Record; also having built up a big enough backlog I finally started playing Life is Strange: Before the Storm (I decided I'm going to do the series in story order, not release order). I actually don't hate it.

The news that Shenmue 1 and 2 have just come out on Gamepass may turn my head though... Dyo-san!

Crash team racing: ooooh no, why do I sense post-launch microtransactions looming ominously with this one? Is it the impressively short adventure mode that can be completed in one half of an evening along with the suspiciously generous promise of free DLC content? Is it the way that most of its functionality is online and even the adventure has to remind me that I can't win the shitty online-bucks or whatever they are when I finish a race offline? Is it the passing mention of "e-sports" like a hastily dropped comment about open relationship on honeymoon night? Is it the main menu tab dedicated to what am assuming must be a cosmetics store but can't confirm due to it not saying anything other than "NO NETWORK, LOSER!" when I click on it (the accompanying picture is that of highly pimped up karts though). Maybe it's the 40-odd page EULA followed by another 30 page document to sign before the game would ever consider letting me play at all?

Or is it Activision?

I think they're gonna screw this one. Pity really, as an honest enjoyable Mario kart substitute with a couple of nice extras, this is pretty damn close.

Finished Death's Gambit a little while ago. Now playing Octopath Traveler, and I'm just over halfway through. Both really good.

hanselthecaretaker:
Plus there are certain mere random enemies that scare the hell outta me in a way that even the giant snake in Sekiro didn?t.

Which ones, out of interest?

Seth Carter:
Snippity-doo-daa

Yeah, combat encounters are very bland in WD2. The amount of power the game gives the player is pretty ridiculous. I've beaten the game now and most encounters were solved by either starting a gang war or using the non-lethal weapons, which are 1hko with proper upgrades, then killing the downed enemies after.

Jordi Chin is still my favorite character in Watch Dogs. I wished I was playing as him instead of Aiden, whose tragic story I just didn't give a damn about. The characters in 2 are certainly weaker. They have their charming points, but overall they're definitely weaker than the characters in 1. The game had a very anime FRIENDSHIP! feeling to it.

trunkage:
Snippity-day

Yeah, this does concern me a little. WD2 does provide a fun playground, but it feels like there's very little of substance to do and it never feels like I'm doing anything impressive. At the very least WD1 had a decent amount of drama to put weight behind Aiden's actions. In WD2 I was just bound to the whims of some self-righteous activists with a body count that could make Nathan Drake blush. Which is weird because Marcus and Wrench have pretty good reasons for fighting the system, but it isn't treated with any real gravitas, aside from one moment with Wrench. If we're basically playing as every NPC that probably won't change.



I just beat Gears of War Ultimate Edition co-op with my uncle. It was a lot of fun, but the teleporting to catch up to the lead character was annoying and the final boss was disappointing. Our fault for playing on Normal I guess. It's a shame I won't be able to play 2 or 3 since they aren't on PC, but 4 is for some damn reason.

I started FF7 and it's a lot better than I assumed it would be. The timer-based combat seems like it'll get annoying at some point but for now it's simple enough. I've only just gotten to the bar for the first time and I assume I'll be attacking the another reactor soon.

The waiting game

Captain Marvelous:

I started FF7 and it's a lot better than I assumed it would be. The timer-based combat seems like it'll get annoying at some point but for now it's simple enough. I've only just gotten to the bar for the first time and I assume I'll be attacking the another reactor soon.

Ah the sweet summer child.

I mean, clearly the entry has its fans, but yeah, get back to us after you leave Midgar.

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