What games are you playing?

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 . . . 48 NEXT
 

Finished the single player for Titanfall 2 last night. Really good, and I honestly don't mind the campaign being short. I prefer a 6-8 hour campaign, than a tedious 12-30+ hours. Now I have to get back to playing Astral Chain.

Casual Shinji:

CM156:
Stardew Valley and Breath of the Wild.
I am getting very tired of the weapon degradation in the latter game. It was not a good idea. I know this isn't exactly a new revelation, but I didn't play the game at launch.

A recurring problem with BotW is its bog standard implementation of otherwise interesting mechanics.

- Rain makes surfaces too slippery to climb. That's interesting, how do you circumvent it? You can't, you just wait it out.
- Weapons are breakable. Interesting. That surely means there's ways to prevent that from happening by fighting more efficiently: attacking during dodge slo-mo, only using certain weapons on specific enemies, finding armor that makes them less fragile? No, they just break. *shrug*

The issue with the breakable weapons isn't even that you run out of weapons, since the game showers you in new ones constantly. It's that everytime you find a new weapon you feel compelled to compare it your current supply, how strong and/or degraded any of them are, whether they have any buffs you need to check in the items menu. The more item slots you get and the more weapons you find the more it turns it into this annoying musical chairs. And ontop of that, the speed at which you go through them makes them feel less like swords, battle axes, and spears, and more like attack consumables. There's just no personality or sense of power to these weapons.

OT: I'm playing it again myself, because it is really fucking good. We'll see if I'll actually finish it this time.

I think you've really hit the nail on the head regarding my problem with the game. For example, thunderstorms. If one just happens along, unequip all metal armor and find a hiding spot. That's not fun. And the disposability of weapons doesn't add any enjoyment to the game. Nor does the rain.

Dalisclock:

CM156:
Stardew Valley and Breath of the Wild.
I am getting very tired of the weapon degradation in the latter game. It was not a good idea. I know this isn't exactly a new revelation, but I didn't play the game at launch.

Careful now. The nintendo fanboys don't like it when you criticize BOTW. They went ballistic on Jim Sterling for that exact reason, even though he said he liked the game in pretty much every other respect.

I haven't play Stardew Valley since around the time it launched and I really want to go back to it. Especially now that they've added a choice of layouts for your farm, so you can focus more on the activities you like without having to run all over the map to do so.

Jim and I don't see eye to eye on a lot of things, but he was and is 100% right about BotW.

As for Stardew Valley, my problem is one of progression. I got to the point in Summer of Year 3 where I don't have much to do. My farm is overwhelmingly profitable and I have maxed out my hearts with all the townspeople. My tools are fully upgraded. I'm married to my rock-loving wife. What is there to work towards? Getting those teleporters for the farm? That's such a grind for what I consider to be a minimal reward.

CM156:

As for Stardew Valley, my problem is one of progression. I got to the point in Summer of Year 3 where I don't have much to do. My farm is overwhelmingly profitable and I have maxed out my hearts with all the townspeople. My tools are fully upgraded. I'm married to my rock-loving wife. What is there to work towards? Getting those teleporters for the farm? That's such a grind for what I consider to be a minimal reward.

I think I finished 2 years and by that point I'd gotten married, upgraded the farm as much as I cared to(got the horse stables and everything) and pretty much just stopped. My farm made a ton of profit and I wasn't even using all the land(I think I was using like half of the plot for actual farming, with some cows and chickens and pigs in there as well). Not to mention you can make some nice cash with blueberries. Once you upgrade the community center(or sell it, you heartless bastard), there's not much to do on that front. What's left is to bum around the town doing all the stuff you've been doing and maybe unlocking more dungeons that get harder as you go, if you're into that sort of thing.

There's also apparently a hidden plot about Aliens being related to those artifacts you might have found and given to the museum along the way, but you need to dig pretty deep for that. I admire the fact the game does have such hidden secrets like that for those who go looking but I kinda wanted to move on. The game doesn't really have an endpoint(or at least it didn't when I played it a couple years back), you decide when you're done and stop.

You maxed out all the hearts so you already know about the dark undercurrents to some of the character stories. Apparently you can also pull the dick move, if you choose, of divorcing your spouse, using a spell to wipe their memory so they forget you were ever married and turn your kid(s) into birds so you're free to date someone else. So yeah, it's fantasy, but the implications are kinda creepy.

UPDATED: Apparently there's a new update coming out in the near future that's supposed to add more to do at end of game, including Post-Baby married life. Not sure what that entails but maybe the kid will be able to grow up somewhat?

Playing through Return to Castle Wolfenstein on PS2 for the first time and having a blast.

CM156:

Casual Shinji:

CM156:
Stardew Valley and Breath of the Wild.
I am getting very tired of the weapon degradation in the latter game. It was not a good idea. I know this isn't exactly a new revelation, but I didn't play the game at launch.

A recurring problem with BotW is its bog standard implementation of otherwise interesting mechanics.

- Rain makes surfaces too slippery to climb. That's interesting, how do you circumvent it? You can't, you just wait it out.
- Weapons are breakable. Interesting. That surely means there's ways to prevent that from happening by fighting more efficiently: attacking during dodge slo-mo, only using certain weapons on specific enemies, finding armor that makes them less fragile? No, they just break. *shrug*

The issue with the breakable weapons isn't even that you run out of weapons, since the game showers you in new ones constantly. It's that everytime you find a new weapon you feel compelled to compare it your current supply, how strong and/or degraded any of them are, whether they have any buffs you need to check in the items menu. The more item slots you get and the more weapons you find the more it turns it into this annoying musical chairs. And ontop of that, the speed at which you go through them makes them feel less like swords, battle axes, and spears, and more like attack consumables. There's just no personality or sense of power to these weapons.

OT: I'm playing it again myself, because it is really fucking good. We'll see if I'll actually finish it this time.

I think you've really hit the nail on the head regarding my problem with the game. For example, thunderstorms. If one just happens along, unequip all metal armor and find a hiding spot. That's not fun. And the disposability of weapons doesn't add any enjoyment to the game. Nor does the rain.
I am getting very tired of the weapon degradation in the latter game. It was not a good idea. I know this isn't exactly a new revelation, but I didn't play the game at launch.

[/quote]

Personally I think the rain helped make the world feel 'alive' in as much as precipitation plus day/night plus shifting wind patterns plus temperatures gives a sense of you being in a world that exists as opposed to you being in a world that exists to service you. They did definitely miss the boat on doing stuff with that though, the wind patterns come up rarely for mildly interesting puzzles, day/night just means boring skeleton enemies and precipitation/temp is just a thing you put up with (like in real life I guess). Having to fight to light a fire in the rain is such bullshit when sitting at a fire is the only way to fast-advance time.

Weapon degradation didn't bother me that much since I put basically no stock in most weapons barring bows, right up until I ran into a weapon that I feel absolutely should not be effected by it but still was. Also the wands. I get limited charges, but you can't give me a rod of cold and a rod of heat and not expect me to just want to have them constantly as utility items for traveling the world and adjusting certain temp ranges or lighting the area. I never used them once to attack an enemy, its too damn useful to have a stick that cools you off on hand for the desert.

---

I was playing BL3 but I put it on ice until they finish the sweeping balance changes. I won't complain about them making an effort to improve the gameplay experience, but I don't want to weather those changes in the course of just playing the game. I'll start again when the coast is clear.

Instead I am now, once again, playing Binding of Isaac. I'm waiting for oxygen not included and hypnospace to come on sale to take its place.

I was at the arcade the other day and had the opportunity to try Halo Fireteam Raven.

It is such utter hot garbage. I rather play more Virtua Cop or Gunblade.

EvilRoy:
Personally I think the rain helped make the world feel 'alive' in as much as precipitation plus day/night plus shifting wind patterns plus temperatures gives a sense of you being in a world that exists as opposed to you being in a world that exists to service you. They did definitely miss the boat on doing stuff with that though, the wind patterns come up rarely for mildly interesting puzzles, day/night just means boring skeleton enemies and precipitation/temp is just a thing you put up with (like in real life I guess). Having to fight to light a fire in the rain is such bullshit when sitting at a fire is the only way to fast-advance time.

They could've made it so that you could use either Flints or some other ore to make climbing spikes. You could then use that not only during the rain but during regular clmibing as well. As soon as you're close to running out of stamina, or are ready to slip, you could jam a spike into the surface you're climbing for a steady hold and to regain stamina. During the rain this would mean you'd have to use a spike every couple of feet. This could then give you the option: Do I use up a bunch of ore in order to climb this rockwall that's either way to high or slippery, or do I try to find my way around or wait it out. They could even put a limit on the amount of spikes you can use during a 24 hour period, so as not have players put 200 spikes in one wall for example.

Wings012:
I was at the arcade the other day and had the opportunity to try Halo Fireteam Raven.

It is such utter hot garbage. I rather play more Virtua Cop or Gunblade.

I did not even know they made Halo rail shooter. How do you even fuck that up? Speaking of Gunblade, I got the LA Machine Gun/NY Gunblade compilation pack for Wii. I will probably pop that in again.

Still playing Trials of Mana. Finally upgraded my classes and got some cool magic and special moves. But there was a scene that cracked me up...

Recently got the Kingdom Hearts edition that collects every game up to KH3. Was thinking about starting Final Mix tonight but I've been overthinking the sword-shield-staff decision for a while now so I'm already worn out before I've even started.

CoCage:

Wings012:
I was at the arcade the other day and had the opportunity to try Halo Fireteam Raven.

It is such utter hot garbage. I rather play more Virtua Cop or Gunblade.

I did not even know they made Halo rail shooter. How do you even fuck that up? Speaking of Gunblade, I got the LA Machine Gun/NY Gunblade compilation pack for Wii. I will probably pop that in again.

There's some Fireteam Raven footage on youtube and it's very obviously terrible if you compare it to footage from other rail shooters.

It's basically incredibly insipid and monotonous. Slow moving very static camera. Enemies kinda plod along, are absolute bullet sponges. There's no way to really prevent them from hitting you, being the bullet sponges they are.

Whereas in Gunblade, there's the very obvious method of shooting missiles down. In Time Crisis, there's the cover system. In games like Virtua Cop or HoTD, enemies either die or stunlock easily so it's a matter of speed and accuracy.

Fireteam raven is just you hosing bullets into slow meat sponges and they inevitably manage to shoot you. So you trade blows and throw enough credits into the game until you win rather than it being skill based. It's a fixed mount gun with a crosshair so it's not like there's a whole lot of skill required - not that it even matters due to enemy design. I just played one life bar and didn't bother continuing. The double widescreen with up to 4 players seems novel at first I suppose but it's such a bleh experience.

Wings012:

CoCage:

Wings012:
I was at the arcade the other day and had the opportunity to try Halo Fireteam Raven.

It is such utter hot garbage. I rather play more Virtua Cop or Gunblade.

I did not even know they made Halo rail shooter. How do you even fuck that up? Speaking of Gunblade, I got the LA Machine Gun/NY Gunblade compilation pack for Wii. I will probably pop that in again.

There's some Fireteam Raven footage on youtube and it's very obviously terrible if you compare it to footage from other rail shooters.

It's basically incredibly insipid and monotonous. Slow moving very static camera. Enemies kinda plod along, are absolute bullet sponges. There's no way to really prevent them from hitting you, being the bullet sponges they are.

Whereas in Gunblade, there's the very obvious method of shooting missiles down. In Time Crisis, there's the cover system. In games like Virtua Cop or HoTD, enemies either die or stunlock easily so it's a matter of speed and accuracy.

Fireteam raven is just you hosing bullets into slow meat sponges and they inevitably manage to shoot you. So you trade blows and throw enough credits into the game until you win rather than it being skill based. It's a fixed mount gun with a crosshair so it's not like there's a whole lot of skill required - not that it even matters due to enemy design. I just played one life bar and didn't bother continuing. The double widescreen with up to 4 players seems novel at first I suppose but it's such a bleh experience.

All of it sounds horrible and waste of a good 4 player experience. Usually some light gun games went up to three players, which was rare enough. This is a game either Sega/AM2 should have developed or Namco.

Finished Celeste(at least up through Chapter 7 and the epilogue). Platformers aren't normally my thing(with a few exceptions like LIMBO, INSIDE and Little Nightmares) but Celeste grabbed me early and just worked. Despite the high difficulty in the base game(and even more if you go for the collectables, the B sides and the bonus levels), the fact it's easy to just try again until you get it helped a lot with making it accessible. I also appreciated the assist mode in the game, which I tried to use only when I needed it, often to add an extra dash or to bump the game speed down a little bit to give me a few extra seconds to react.

Aside from the tight, well designed platforming, the game works because it uses Madeleines character arc part of the climb up the mountain(which the platforming is an abstraction of) and her need to deal with her darker feelings and emotions in a productive way.

I'm not sure if I'm going to go back and collect the hearts in order to access chapter 8. I'd like to see if\t but I might just be done with the game right now. Chapter 9 is apparently for experts only(and requires a ton of work to even unlock) so I'll probably just youtube that to see it without spending days in self imposed masochism.

7 mountains/ 21 strawberries

Still playing Trials of Mana. I must be getting near the end now; but, my god! Changing to the third class is a pain. Not only you need to reach level 38; but you also need to farm a specific item for the class you want to upgrade to, which is random and you may end up with loads items for the classes you don't want. At the end I said f*** this, and went with the classes I already had items for, because if I kept leveling up during the farming I wouldn't get the chance to learn the late-game spells.

Red Dead Redemption 2 Online is possibly the best way to play the game now. The gameplay mechanics are more responsive and a lot of the SP's more methodical animations for things like skinning animals and looting have been streamlined. There is also a ton more gear available to customize your character in a way that would make SoulsBorne games blush. Even my horse is pretty tricked out.

For anyone interested, the Outlaw Pass is also 100% worth the grind if you don't have enough gold bars yet. Playing regularly, it ends up paying dividends with all the gear, daily item replenishments, RDO $ and gold bars you get back. I'm not even part of a permanent posse but could see how that would be appealing for different aspects. Playing solo in a way might even be better though, considering the servers still have some stability issues the more people are on. Still, I've only gotten disconnected a handful of times after about 40 or so hours with it so far. With defensive mode it's rare to ever get griefed too. Probably has happened even less times than disconnects.

Since I last posted, I've played through Astral Chain (which I mostly loved, though the ersatz platforming was usually quite bad), Link's Awakening remake (which I enjoyed, but it was not worth the pricetag) and Blasphemous.

I want to get the Platinum trophy for Blasphemous, but I think I'll wait until they patch in NG+ and a boss-rush mode (both of which were Kickstarter stretch goals, so we should see them at some point). Otherwise that trophy's gonna be a drag.

Having just finished replaying Resident Evil 4, I'm now moving on to Shinji Mikami's subsequent title, God Hand. I have played it before, but not that much of it, only the first world. This time, I'm hoping to actually finish the game. Luckily, dying in the game doesn't mean dying in real life.

Finished replaying INSIDE.

INSIDE holds up very well on a 2nd play-through and actually goes a little faster because I kinda remembered the solution to many of the puzzles(aside from a few where I forgot like one little detail and got stuck until I remembered "Oh, that's right...."). Most of what makes it work(other then the organic puzzles) is the use of the environment to tell a story(albeit a very cryptic one). Like LIMBO, there is no dialogue or narration and the only text you get starting the game is the title. You just get dropped into a forest with no context or explanation and have no choice but to move right. Which leads you to a massive city/facility which has an incredibly dystopian feel to it, both due to how abandoned and desolate much of it is and how it's clear some kind of disturbing activities are going on there.

What makes it so unsettling is that it's never clear what is going on, you just have to extrapolate based on what you see during the 3 hr run of the game(and then there's a secret ending which adds a little more context but creates further questions). It feels like a better realized version of LIMBO on every level(while I liked LIMBO, it felt more surreal and dreamlike then anything else, whereas INSIDE feels like a disturbingly grounded Sci-Fi nightmare).?

I was kinda surprised that the part I dreaded the most(the underwater section with the "mermaid") surprisingly isn't nearly as much of the game as I remembered it being the last time I played it around the time it came out. There's like one section where it's really a threat, but I spent a significant portion of the game dreading it(particularly whenever I had to go swimming) because I couldn't remember exactly when the thing shows up and trying to drown the boy.

7 Black Mesas / 3 CUBEs

Playing Borderlands 3, and and its alright.

The gunplay is definitely better, but the story is just a dud.

Going from Handsome Jack - one of my favourite villains in just about anything ever - to these Calypso twins, is just... sad.

I could say that maybe im just not into meme humour anymore, but I still find BL2 funny, and I recently played Tales from the Borderlands with my girlfriend, and that was a great time, so I can only conclude that the writing has just taken a bad turn into mediocrity.

Still love the loot grind, though.

Dying Light. It's Dead Island. That's my review.

Silvanus:
Since I last posted, I've played through Astral Chain (which I mostly loved, though the ersatz platforming was usually quite bad), Link's Awakening remake (which I enjoyed, but it was not worth the pricetag) and Blasphemous.

I want to get the Platinum trophy for Blasphemous, but I think I'll wait until they patch in NG+ and a boss-rush mode (both of which were Kickstarter stretch goals, so we should see them at some point). Otherwise that trophy's gonna be a drag.

Still in the middle of Astral Chain. I just finished the chapter where you get the dog legion and it is fun so far even if the camera can be frustrating at times. About how long is this game, anyway? I feel like I have hardly unlocked any of the cosmetic rewards despite feeling like I have already played a lot of it.

Finished Collection of Mana's Trials of Mana. Not bad, but it has several flaws that I already mentioned in previous posts: the main menu and stock items menu are slow; and the bosses are damage sponges (and as everything pauses whenever a spell or a special attack is made, the boss battles take way longer than they should be).

Control

Alan Wake 2.0. Didn't play Quantum Break so that actually might be 2.0

This was sold to me as how Jedi should really be fighting. Because lightsabers are really stupid when you can force throw items at people. It is incredibly awesome to levitate above a battleground and rain grenades, filing cabinets and forklifts at the enemy. Even your weapon is cool. A shapeshifter gun that can be changed to suit your needs.

The whole place has a Twin Peaks vibe, particularly the character. It a group that house artifacts, which feel like they're from Warehouse 13 (except nothing is tied to a historical figure.) The building is being serverly affected by the artifacts so sometimes it shapeshifts the building, meaning, at times, you are walking on the roof

Also Dyna-mite. Almost as funny as drunk Witcher parties

9/10

Fappy:

Still in the middle of Astral Chain. I just finished the chapter where you get the dog legion and it is fun so far even if the camera can be frustrating at times. About how long is this game, anyway? I feel like I have hardly unlocked any of the cosmetic rewards despite feeling like I have already played a lot of it.

Took me 25 hours for a playthrough. By the time I finished, though, I still had hardly any of the cosmetic rewards. They must be tied to specific goals/ side missions or higher difficulties.

Bioshock Infinite: And I didn't like it too much.

Far Cry 1: The game busted my balls and it had no ending.

FEAR Extraction Point: No point in playing Perseus Mandate.

Still playing Valkyria Chronicles 3. I'm at chapter 10, which should be about halfway if the other VC games are anything to go by.

I'm of two minds about it. On one hand I feel it improves on several aspects of VC2. I like how you can freely switch a characters' class on the fly to whatever you want. Got a surplus of Scouts and need more Stormtroopers? Just make some. It also prevents character from being locked into a role, which I felt was kind of annoying in VC2 and its half-dozen subclasses per main class, half of which tended to not be very useful in practice. I like the overal more serious tone of the game. It's still very anime, but commanding a penal legion that doesn't exist on paper is much preferable to the high school hijinks of VC2. Also, a bunch of cowards, deserters, criminals and other disgraced ne'er-do-wells makes for more interesting characters.

On the other hand, the limitations of the PSP really hamper it. Mission scope was small in VC2, divided as they were into 3-5 interconnected smaller chunks drawn from a roster of maybe two dozen, which get re-used in various configurations, and VC3 is the same. I'm also pretty sure at least half the map chunks are recycled from VC2. Not to mention there's only 4 or 5 different mission objectives, mostly "kill all enemies" and "capture x camps". In short, 90% of missions play out very similarly and repetition sets in quickly.

I don't hate VC3, it's fun in short half hour bursts and I overall like it a little more than VC2. With the much better VC4 still relatively fresh in my memory tho, its shortcomings are all the more apparent. I'll finish it, but I doubt I'll ever want to replay it.

I wonder if the series still has a future. None of the first 3 games had particularly good sales, but VC1's rerelease on Steam seems to have done relatively well though. I've seen some indications VC4 didn't do brilliantly either, tho I guess that depends on Sega's sales expectations. And Valkyria Revolution? Don't think I've ever seen a copy of that.

Played Little Nightmares. Not bad. It's a puzzle-platformer similar to Inside (but with enough budget to afford being able to walk in more directions than just left and right) with a horror theme. Dark, atmospheric, creepy and full of deformed people, it's an ok game; but perfect for Halloween.

With BL3 on hold pending balancing stopping and my wrist resting I picked up Oxygen Not Included. I didnt care for Don't Starve as I felt the game was an endless uphill struggle with no real footholds, but ONI (made by the same people) feels a lot more do-able to me. There are clear points where you can develop near-zero sum recycling sustaining systems, and on the starter worlds you usually have the resources you need to establish yourself and step back to let your duplicants destress and figure out next steps so it isnt a constant desperate struggle.

The duplicants are emotive and intetesting and, with few exceptions, not idiots. They try to avoid doing stuff that will get them killed or trapped unless something goes wrong or you force them.

I'm finding the replay comes from the sheer variety of stuff to learn and carry out. Get established, wait why is everyone always sick. Time to learn water and air sanitation. Start dreaming of spaceflight and oh no! Your base is hitting a mean tempurature of 28 degrees C (unpleasant). Time to learn temp management. Get the temp under control and start digging a missle silo, whoops CO2 is pooling really badly and creating asphyxiation risks for the dupes. Time to learn ventilation. A few of these in a row and I start over with a better picture of my global base strategy.

The nicest thing I've been finding is that in spite of the complexity the game is surprisingly intuitive. If the water is unsafe to drink, boil it. The base is too hot, build coolers, too cold, build heaters. It isnt necessarily easy to reasearch each solution, gather resources, and figure out how to efficiently carry it out, but I always know "what" needs to happen next even if the "how" will take some pondering.

Johnny Novgorod:
Dying Light. It's Dead Island. That's my review.

That was a pretty short review. Kind of dead. Care to en-lighten us? I mean, no man is an island.

Hawki:

Johnny Novgorod:
Dying Light. It's Dead Island. That's my review.

That was a pretty short review. Kind of dead. Care to en-lighten us? I mean, no man is an island.

image

I'm actually enjoying it quite a bit. Just got the bow and the grappling hook so now it's 90% Dead Island, 5% Far Cry, 5% Just Cause. I like that the zombies don't just sponge up damage like in Dead Island and a well-placed arrow or bullet to the head takes them out. The other two "unique" mechanics are the parkour, which is a marginal improvement on Dead Island's platforming but gets better as you get the XP, and the nighttime gameplay, which makes zombies scary again for a change.

CaitSeith:
Played Little Nightmares. Not bad. It's a puzzle-platformer similar to Inside (but with enough budget to afford being able to walk in more directions than just left and right) with a horror theme. Dark, atmospheric, creepy and full of deformed people, it's an ok game; but perfect for Halloween.

I'm replaying that right now. I really like INSIDE, but I feel it's a better game then INSIDE is, with the need to deal with the z axis(Sort of) providing a little bit more of a complication to a lot of puzzles then INSIDE or LIMBO. It also a feels like a lot of the puzzles are a bit more organic then INSIDE and I appreciate having roughly one main theme/villian per area as well as the pacing where you get a chance to breathe between tense/frantic bits.

Also, the Janitor might be more of the most disturbing human-like monsters I can think of. He's just so off in so many ways.

Samtemdo8:

Far Cry 1: The game busted my balls and it had no ending.

FC1 feels like it kinda runs out of steam near the end. And dropping you in a forest full of mutants with a rifle and one magazine with little chance to get more ammo(in a game where one mutant can easily soak up a magazine)? That was just brutal. Especially in a game where stealth feels hit and miss most of the time.

I think I ended up just running as fast as I could to the water and hoping not to die.

Dalisclock:

CaitSeith:
Played Little Nightmares. Not bad. It's a puzzle-platformer similar to Inside (but with enough budget to afford being able to walk in more directions than just left and right) with a horror theme. Dark, atmospheric, creepy and full of deformed people, it's an ok game; but perfect for Halloween.

I'm replaying that right now. I really like INSIDE, but I feel it's a better game then INSIDE is, with the need to deal with the z axis(Sort of) providing a little bit more of a complication to a lot of puzzles then INSIDE or LIMBO. It also a feels like a lot of the puzzles are a bit more organic then INSIDE and I appreciate having roughly one main theme/villian per area as well as the pacing where you get a chance to breathe between tense/frantic bits.

Also, the Janitor might be more of the most disturbing human-like monsters I can think of. He's just so off in so many ways.

I don't know, ignoring that Little Nightmares is a bit too keen on "homaging" Spirited Away, I can't say the 3D platforming with a 2D camera was that intuitive. When I messed up in Inside it felt like it was my fault, when I messed up in Little Nightmares it felt like it was because the camera didn't give me the proper view to navigate.

Casual Shinji:

Dalisclock:

CaitSeith:
Played Little Nightmares. Not bad. It's a puzzle-platformer similar to Inside (but with enough budget to afford being able to walk in more directions than just left and right) with a horror theme. Dark, atmospheric, creepy and full of deformed people, it's an ok game; but perfect for Halloween.

I'm replaying that right now. I really like INSIDE, but I feel it's a better game then INSIDE is, with the need to deal with the z axis(Sort of) providing a little bit more of a complication to a lot of puzzles then INSIDE or LIMBO. It also a feels like a lot of the puzzles are a bit more organic then INSIDE and I appreciate having roughly one main theme/villian per area as well as the pacing where you get a chance to breathe between tense/frantic bits.

Also, the Janitor might be more of the most disturbing human-like monsters I can think of. He's just so off in so many ways.

I don't know, ignoring that Little Nightmares is a bit too keen on "homaging" Spirited Away, I can't say the 3D platforming with a 2D camera was that intuitive. When I messed up in Inside it felt like it was my fault, when I messed up in Little Nightmares it felt like it was because the camera didn't give me the proper view to navigate.

Yeah. More than once the chase sequences ended in epic failure by hitting the escape route's frame.

OT: I'm playing Ni No Kuni in the Switch. The artwork inside the Wizard's Companion makes me pretty nostalgic (it reminds me of the old D&D manuals)

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 . . . 48 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here