What games are you playing?

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 . . . 54 NEXT
 

The Ninja Warriors Once Again. The Ninja Saviors stateside. I beat the game already, but my main problem with the game is that to play new characters, you have to beat the game twice. Instead of unlocking them from the start. I hate artificial padding games. We know the game is short, but don't advertiser new character lock them behind beating a game, most hardcore fans have played multiple time. There is no saving between stages either, but it's not that big a deal for me. You can still select stages for time attack since they got rid of scoring entirely.

Sorry to start off negative, but this is a great game. One of the best remakes of an SNES classic. I got mine on the Switch to make it feel more appropriate. Each character has their own move sets and new moves added making it play similarly, but differently from the SNES version. The combat give most of the characters interesting juggles and air combos to experiment with. Why was there not a training. The input commands are like Final Fight and Street Fighter-lite. Easy to know; semi difficult to master. There is a co-op mode, but both players share the same life bar. So it requires both players to be at the top of their game. I recommend this game if you're in to old school brawlers from the 16 bit and arcade days.

Super Robot Wars Endless Fronter EXCEED recently had its fan translation completed. So I'm playing it for a second time.

I was a big fan of the first game which got localized, but the second game unfortunately never was. I think it was released close to the end of the DS' life and such is the fate of many games. I did finish the Japanese version of the game - it had a UI translation for the longest time so that and a combination of gamefaqs was good enough to figure it out. But now there's a proper full translation so it is time for round 2.

I honestly had more patience for spectacle back in the day. The combat system is essentially just timing attacks which are quite lengthy combos and the general objective is to juggle the opponent. The animations are fancy and nice, but it is a very drawn out way to just deliver damage and spend a turn. I find myself getting tired of the game after an hour or two, so I'm taking it quite slowly. Back in the day I'd be happy to zone out and play such games for 4-5 hours straight.

I was also playing Super Robot Wars V, but I kinda lost interest after 20 odd missions or so. Again, I had more patience for these sorta games back then.

Digimon Cyber Sleuth is also finally out, so I guess I'll be halting EXCEED to try that out...

So I beat Gears 5. Pretty good. Very good actually. In fact, it's the best game I've played in the series since Gears 2, and it even surpasses that game in a number of areas.

Right now, I'm playing Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare. And before you get the insults ready, I'll say in my defence that this is the first CoD game I've played since Final Front, so it's a new thing for me. That said, the game is...okay. Not quite "painfully average," but "okay." The gameplay is okay. The characters are okay. The story is, at best, okay. It does everything more or less competently, but doesn't really shine anywhere, and I'm reminded of better games and stories when playing it. Sci-fi shooter with an aesthetic rooted in modern militaries? I can go to Halo for that. Choosing targets via a star map with Brian Bloom? I can play StarCraft II for that. Story based on tensions between Mars and Earth reaching boiling point? I've got The Expanse for that.

(Seriously, the game wants to remind you at every turn that the SDF is EEVILLL.)

Like, it's okay, but if this is the stuff that's being released on a yearly basis, I can see why so many people are fatigued with the CoD series.

Hawki:

Right now, I'm playing Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare. And before you get the insults ready, I'll say in my defence that this is the first CoD game I've played since Final Front, so it's a new thing for me. That said, the game is...okay. Not quite "painfully average," but "okay." The gameplay is okay. The characters are okay. The story is, at best, okay. It does everything more or less competently, but doesn't really shine anywhere, and I'm reminded of better games and stories when playing it. Sci-fi shooter with an aesthetic rooted in modern militaries? I can go to Halo for that. Choosing targets via a star map with Brian Bloom? I can play StarCraft II for that. Story based on tensions between Mars and Earth reaching boiling point? I've got The Expanse for that.

(Seriously, the game wants to remind you at every turn that the SDF is EEVILLL.)

Like, it's okay, but if this is the stuff that's being released on a yearly basis, I can see why so many people are fatigued with the CoD series.

I liked some of the missions in IW and generally liked the concept of getting to do side missions in between the main ones, with a mix of fighter combat(as shallow as that is) and on foot ground action.

It's just everything else felt rather "eh". Jon Snow was a rather craptacular villain, who pretty much just shouts at the camera a lot. The plot was fucking stupid as hell, even for one of these sort of games. I get they wanted to do Carrier ops and ground combat and space fighter dogfights, but having them all be the same guy is fucking nuts and makes no sense. Hell, this series is well known for having you play mutiple characters in a campaign(the game itself even does so in the intro) to show the story from different POVs so why not have them being 3 different character you leap back and forth from?

Not to mention the whole issue of "We had to make great sacrifices" really falls apart when the big reason those sacrifices are happening is everyone's incredibly stupid decisions throughout the plot. The entire fleet on Fleet Week at the same time despite War nearly upon them? Yep. Sacrificing your only carrier to capture another carrier which you then sacrifice on a suicide rush to Mars? Yep. Setting a trap for the bad guys which ends up backfiring because you never bothered to clear the bombs from your own HQ they planted there during the last attack? Double yep.

Also, IIRC, the entire game apparently takes place in one day. Not even joking. Which makes it even more bizarre and stupid.

I swear, the game is like a crash course on how to get everyone killed by making poor decisions and then not seeing the irony in it at all.

That's right, never mind spoilers...

Dalisclock:

I liked some of the missions in IW and generally liked the concept of getting to do side missions in between the main ones, with a mix of fighter combat(as shallow as that is)

Supposedly, some reviewer said that the space combat was deep enough to carry a game by itself. If this is true, I'd like to know what the reviewer was smoking.

It's just everything else felt rather "eh". Jon Snow was a rather craptacular villain, who pretty much just shouts at the camera a lot.

"Mars aeterunum." "Death is no disgrace." "Surrender and prepare to be executed."

Oh God, shut up!

Thing about Kotch is that from what I've played so far, there's a tonne of potential with his character. Reading the personnel files, I get the sense that the reason he hates Earth is that he's been raised to hate Earth, going to the academy, instilled with SDF values, etc. There's a potential tragedy with his character there, because if nothing else, he's intelligent (at least by conciet of the plot, he has to be to pull off an attack on Earth), but is simply in a society where from day 1 you're told "Earth is bad, destroy Earth." Unfortunately, it's potential that's not been fulfilled so far, and I'm guessing isn't.

I get they wanted to do Carrier ops and ground combat and space fighter dogfights, but having them all be the same guy is fucking nuts and makes no sense. Hell, this series is well known for having you play mutiple characters in a campaign(the game itself even does so in the intro) to show the story from different POVs so why not have them being 3 different character you leap back and forth from?

Not that I can comment with that much authority, but hasn't CoD steadily focused on fewer characters per game as time goes on? The series started out with the idea of "play as a regular soldier in WWII." Then, ever since Modern Warfare, it's become more character-centric, with said characters usually being special forces soldiers. So in that sense, that Reyes is the only character you play as for almost all of the game isn't really a dealbreaker in of itself for me, but I really feel the game suffers from a lack of an SDF perspective. We're otherwise left with a bunch of faceless bad guys who, regardless of whatever legitimate grievances they have with Earth, are presented as being so murderous and bloodthirsty that it becomes a moot point. They're bad people who do bad things. And while I can buy that living on Mars could generate a different, harsher culture than Earth, the end result is that they're cardboard cutouts.

But as for Reyes being the commander of Retribution, plus a pilot, plus a ground soldier? TBH, I'm not as miffed by that contrivance as I might be otherwise. It's at least stated that the ship is low on personnel, so I can buy that Reyes needs to step in. I mean, Wing Commander IV and Mass Effect got away with the idea of "Blair/Shepard doesn't know what delegation means, so he gets to go on these missions in addition to commanding the ship, never mind chain of command if he gets killed." Still, it's a contrivance all the same.

Also, IIRC, the entire game apparently takes place in one day. Not even joking. Which makes it even more bizarre and stupid.

So I've read, and from what I've seen in the game, that appears to be the case. Honestly, I have no idea as to why. From an in-universe perspective, I've no idea how the crew of 'Retribution' is supposed to do all these operations in the timespan of 24 hours because not only would there need to be planning, but you'd need to give soldiers time to rest between ops. Heck, how long is Reyes out cold after Titan? And from an out of universe perspective, if it is a concious choice to make the game take place over so short a time, I'm left to ask, why? How does that elevate the narrative? The M.O. is presented as "keep SDF busy while the fleet rebuilds," so either a fleet can be rebuilt in 24 hours, or there was never any need to rebuild said fleet.

Hawki:
So I beat Gears 5. Pretty good. Very good actually. In fact, it's the best game I've played in the series since Gears 2, and it even surpasses that game in a number of areas.

In what way? If it's weight, intesnity, and small details, Gears 5 lacks that. Gears 5 lacks weight and intensity

Not to rain your parade. If it's the best game to you, go right ahead. I think Gears 2 or 3 are still the best in the series, and I am not even a hardcore fan of the series. To me, Vanquish is the best cover shooter ever, but that is getting off topic.

I beat Ninja Saviors again to unlock Raiden. And my God he is tough to use. He might be huge, but it's hard to control a sloooww giant robot, fighting multiple tiny enemies. I don't want to imagine what co-op is like with this character. Something like this needs a lot of practice. Right now I am playing hard mode with Ninja since he is my favorite. From what I noticed, the only difference from Normal mode is more enemies spawn or appears around certain bosses, and they do slightly more damage. Otherwise, it's mostly the same as Normal mode.

CoCage:

In what way? If it's weight, intesnity, and small details, Gears 5 lacks that. Gears 5 lacks weight and intensity

Not to rain your parade. If it's the best game to you, go right ahead. I think Gears 2 or 3 are still the best in the series, and I am not even a hardcore fan of the series.

Well, I said that Gears 5 was the best in the series since Gears 2. Gears 2 still takes the #1 spot. But that aside, if the purpose of the video is to show that Gears 2 is more gory than Gears 5, I'm not going to argue that. But that's not really a dealbreaker - gore isn't make or break in any franchise (and if its' a question of intensity, the game's plenty intense at times). But I guess if I were to sum up why Gears 5 is so high up, I can try boiling it down to the following areas:

-Gears 4 played it safe, Gears 5 feels like an evolution of the series (this is a broad statement, but it's a feeling that permeates the game)

-It's got one of the strongest plots in the series.

-Does great work with character banter. This has generally been a strength in the series, but here, it goes the extra mile, whether it's breaking J.D. down, or building Kait and Del up, and introducing Fahz - a character you hate at the start, but like by the end (he's more or less the game's equivalent of Baird).

-Jack is back, and with upgrades/abilities and personality (yes, he has a personality, and he's awesome, even if he's technically a mute). When I talked about evolution, the ability to use Jack as a support for various situations gives the gameplay a lot more depth.

-The open world segments are actually a lot of fun. I was dubious that they could be pulled off in a TPS, but nope, they actually do it. Regardless of how the segments are beautiful and reinforce that Sera is a living world with different environments, they're fun to navigate, and the objectives aren't filler. It's basically how open world should be in a game like this.

-Multiplayer is fun, or at least Escape mode is (honestly, Gears multiplayer's never been my thing outside Horde).

In spite of all this, I'd still rank Gears 2 higher, because among other things, Gears 5, for all its strengths, retreads a lot of the same ground as Gears 2. We literally revisit old locations (Ephyra*, New Hope), and the plot arc is fairly similar, in that not only are we delving into the origins of the Locust (again), but the flow of the plot is fairly similar as well. Replace the Riftworm with the Kraken, replace Jacinto with Settlement 1, consider how both games represent an escalation from the previous one (Gears 1/4 are both small scale), and Gears 5 is wearing its influence on its shoulder. Also, good as the open world segments are, they can drag a bit at times, whereas Gears 2 keeps moving.

*Yes, I know Ephyra is from Gears 1, but it's here, and it's literally pointed out that you're retreading old ground. It's fanservice done right, in that it's fanservice that's relevant to the plot thematically, but fanservice all the same.

Hawki:

CoCage:

In what way? If it's weight, intesnity, and small details, Gears 5 lacks that. Gears 5 lacks weight and intensity

Not to rain your parade. If it's the best game to you, go right ahead. I think Gears 2 or 3 are still the best in the series, and I am not even a hardcore fan of the series.

Well, I said that Gears 5 was the best in the series since Gears 2. Gears 2 still takes the #1 spot. But that aside, if the purpose of the video is to show that Gears 2 is more gory than Gears 5, I'm not going to argue that. But that's not really a dealbreaker - gore isn't make or break in any franchise (and if its' a question of intensity, the game's plenty intense at times). But I guess if I were to sum up why Gears 5 is so high up, I can try boiling it down to the following areas:

-Gears 4 played it safe, Gears 5 feels like an evolution of the series (this is a broad statement, but it's a feeling that permeates the game)

-It's got one of the strongest plots in the series.

-Does great work with character banter. This has generally been a strength in the series, but here, it goes the extra mile, whether it's breaking J.D. down, or building Kait and Del up, and introducing Fahz - a character you hate at the start, but like by the end (he's more or less the game's equivalent of Baird).

-Jack is back, and with upgrades/abilities and personality (yes, he has a personality, and he's awesome, even if he's technically a mute). When I talked about evolution, the ability to use Jack as a support for various situations gives the gameplay a lot more depth.

-The open world segments are actually a lot of fun. I was dubious that they could be pulled off in a TPS, but nope, they actually do it. Regardless of how the segments are beautiful and reinforce that Sera is a living world with different environments, they're fun to navigate, and the objectives aren't filler. It's basically how open world should be in a game like this.

-Multiplayer is fun, or at least Escape mode is (honestly, Gears multiplayer's never been my thing outside Horde).

In spite of all this, I'd still rank Gears 2 higher, because among other things, Gears 5, for all its strengths, retreads a lot of the same ground as Gears 2. We literally revisit old locations (Ephyra*, New Hope), and the plot arc is fairly similar, in that not only are we delving into the origins of the Locust (again), but the flow of the plot is fairly similar as well. Replace the Riftworm with the Kraken, replace Jacinto with Settlement 1, consider how both games represent an escalation from the previous one (Gears 1/4 are both small scale), and Gears 5 is wearing its influence on its shoulder. Also, good as the open world segments are, they can drag a bit at times, whereas Gears 2 keeps moving.

*Yes, I know Ephyra is from Gears 1, but it's here, and it's literally pointed out that you're retreading old ground. It's fanservice done right, in that it's fanservice that's relevant to the plot thematically, but fanservice all the same.

No probs, just wanted to hear a different perspective

After a bit under 70 hours I got the true ending in Code Vein. The game is incredibly underrated based on the reviews it got. It does what it sets out to do with the gameplay that allows you to combine something like 250 unique skills in builds of 12 (8 active, 4 passive) to make your own playstyle out of countless permutations but also delivers a touching story experience with some really epic events. I really enjoy how out there some of the skills are, such as for example the skill that makes you able to do moves even without any stamina at the cost of HP or the skill that makes projectiles appear every time you properly dodge (basically having invincibility frames save you from a hit) and we can't forget the whole "parrying refreshes your stamina bar" thingy too. These are just some of the standouts. Oh and magic feels really powerful in this game too, especially the spells which set out a bunch of projectiles that peroidically shoot out as you move around. It just feels fun.

The best thing about it all is that it definitely isn't going to be the last for the series, as the ending basically sequel baits you as hard as everything without having it detract at all from how satisfying it is to finally put an end to this story.

So now with that behind me, I can finally immerse myself in a huge Jrpg. Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel 2 (ps4 remake) in particular. The third game in the series is coming out soon and I had put off replaying 2 so that I can play 3 right after it since I've waited for 3 to come out for a good 5 years (ever since the JP release of sen 2 came out basically) so lets just say that's a good 200~ hours of Jrpg goodness to look forward to. Can't wait! :D

Dreiko:
After a bit under 70 hours I got the true ending in Code Vein. The game is incredibly underrated based on the reviews it got. It does what it sets out to do with the gameplay that allows you to combine something like 250 unique skills in builds of 12 (8 active, 4 passive) to make your own playstyle out of countless permutations but also delivers a touching story experience with some really epic events. I really enjoy how out there some of the skills are, such as for example the skill that makes you able to do moves even without any stamina at the cost of HP or the skill that makes projectiles appear every time you properly dodge (basically having invincibility frames save you from a hit) and we can't forget the whole "parrying refreshes your stamina bar" thingy too. These are just some of the standouts. Oh and magic feels really powerful in this game too, especially the spells which set out a bunch of projectiles that peroidically shoot out as you move around. It just feels fun.

The best thing about it all is that it definitely isn't going to be the last for the series, as the ending basically sequel baits you as hard as everything without having it detract at all from how satisfying it is to finally put an end to this story.

So now with that behind me, I can finally immerse myself in a huge Jrpg. Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel 2 (ps4 remake) in particular. The third game in the series is coming out soon and I had put off replaying 2 so that I can play 3 right after it since I've waited for 3 to come out for a good 5 years (ever since the JP release of sen 2 came out basically) so lets just say that's a good 200~ hours of Jrpg goodness to look forward to. Can't wait! :D

I just started Code Vein last night after finishing Astral Chain. I only managed to get past the first boss so far since I spent like 2 hours in the character creator lol.

Been on a RDR2 kick for the last couple months now, about half online but went back to the story mode. It's probably secured a spot in my top 5 games of all time and I'm not even half way through chapter 4 yet, judging by the others' lengths. One thing I really love is how not only are the missions the most interesting and varied Rockstar has done, but the peripheral content is equally engaging and to me has yet to feel tedious.

A big factor in that goes to how steamlined the inventory system is. I'm about 50% complete with at least as many hours and have not once had to "manage" it. At most I'm looking for a particular item which is usually easy to find. Another thing is that outside of the story mode, the activities are mostly elective, meaning you take part if you feel like it rather than being forced to. Usually stuff like camp chores are worth the core perks for the minute or so they take.

The game's attention to detail is really what keeps me playing though, from gameplay nuances to incidentals. Not my footage, but damn look at those physics.

Fappy:

Dreiko:
After a bit under 70 hours I got the true ending in Code Vein. The game is incredibly underrated based on the reviews it got. It does what it sets out to do with the gameplay that allows you to combine something like 250 unique skills in builds of 12 (8 active, 4 passive) to make your own playstyle out of countless permutations but also delivers a touching story experience with some really epic events. I really enjoy how out there some of the skills are, such as for example the skill that makes you able to do moves even without any stamina at the cost of HP or the skill that makes projectiles appear every time you properly dodge (basically having invincibility frames save you from a hit) and we can't forget the whole "parrying refreshes your stamina bar" thingy too. These are just some of the standouts. Oh and magic feels really powerful in this game too, especially the spells which set out a bunch of projectiles that peroidically shoot out as you move around. It just feels fun.

The best thing about it all is that it definitely isn't going to be the last for the series, as the ending basically sequel baits you as hard as everything without having it detract at all from how satisfying it is to finally put an end to this story.

So now with that behind me, I can finally immerse myself in a huge Jrpg. Legend of Heroes: Trails of Cold Steel 2 (ps4 remake) in particular. The third game in the series is coming out soon and I had put off replaying 2 so that I can play 3 right after it since I've waited for 3 to come out for a good 5 years (ever since the JP release of sen 2 came out basically) so lets just say that's a good 200~ hours of Jrpg goodness to look forward to. Can't wait! :D

I just started Code Vein last night after finishing Astral Chain. I only managed to get past the first boss so far since I spent like 2 hours in the character creator lol.

Oh man, don't get me started. That thing is very intricate lol. Here's my guy btw:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wU5twvJ17gQ

(the hound blood veils remind me too much of Hellsing so I made him like the bound Alucard that Integra found :P)

Total War: Warhammer II at long f***ing last... surprised my craptop can even handle it... -.-

Yay for steam sales...

And EXCEED is on the backburner. I've sunk 10+ hours into Cyber Sleuth. Haven't really been progressing much. I've been dicking around a lot, farming up digimon scan data. Definitely went a bit overboard, I have more digimon than I know what to do with. And if I want a specific digimon, I think it is more productive to go up and down the digivolution pathways in an attempt to reach your desired result while also gaining ABI and increasing my max level cap. Than raising so goddamn many. Though you do need to have discovered a specific digimon before you can devolve into it, so I guess all my scan farming had at least contributed to that.

I still remember my Digimon World 2 end game party of MetalSeadramon, Imperialdramon and WarGreymon. I wonder if I want to repeat that. Or should I just submit to my base desires and build a harem of Lilithmon and whoever else?

Wings012:
And EXCEED is on the backburner. I've sunk 10+ hours into Cyber Sleuth. Haven't really been progressing much. I've been dicking around a lot, farming up digimon scan data. Definitely went a bit overboard, I have more digimon than I know what to do with. And if I want a specific digimon, I think it is more productive to go up and down the digivolution pathways in an attempt to reach your desired result while also gaining ABI and increasing my max level cap. Than raising so goddamn many. Though you do need to have discovered a specific digimon before you can devolve into it, so I guess all my scan farming had at least contributed to that.

I still remember my Digimon World 2 end game party of MetalSeadramon, Imperialdramon and WarGreymon. I wonder if I want to repeat that. Or should I just submit to my base desires and build a harem of Lilithmon and whoever else?

With a lot of them you genuinely need to do the up and down evolution cause the level they evolve at is beyond their initial max level. Also, pay attention to CAM which is needed for some evolutions and for DNA evolutions both digimon need 100 of it lol.

As for scan data, you'll end up with a bunch at 200 to a point where you just create spare digimon and feed them to your good ones as an exp boost. You don't need to worry too much over scanning since it builds pretty hard by itself. Also, I recommend trying the game on hard difficulty, it's a ton more fun and legit difficult.

Also, on a side note, isn't Nokia one of the funniest chars ever? She makes me laugh too much lol.

SckizoBoy:
Total War: Warhammer II at long f***ing last... surprised my craptop can even handle it... -.-

Yay for steam sales...

Enjoy it, Sckizo! It's one hell of a game!

I just bought Moons of Madness, it looks like SOMA in space and I'm all about that shit. Might also have to play Funcom's other horror game, The Park, as well.

Finally getting around to playing The Last of Us

I love the Uncharted games, so it seems like a natural fit for me, and with Halloween around the corner, I figured it fitting to play something with a bit of a spooky tone, seeing as the game features weird mushroom zombies and all.

And you know, its fun. A story-based, linear game is always a win for me, and the combat is suitably crunchy. It has a nice mix of stealth and combat sections, and Im actually enjoying myself for once on this thread.

Seems strange that I let the game sit on my shelf for a good 2 years, but I decided to play some real trash like Homefront a few months back.

And once I complete it, I can finally look at some TLoU2 gameplay.

Playing Hollow Knight again, because... it's Hollow Knight, and I still hadn't finished it. And I'm trying to before Silk Song comes out, though I still don't know when that is.

Dreiko:

Wings012:
And EXCEED is on the backburner. I've sunk 10+ hours into Cyber Sleuth. Haven't really been progressing much. I've been dicking around a lot, farming up digimon scan data. Definitely went a bit overboard, I have more digimon than I know what to do with. And if I want a specific digimon, I think it is more productive to go up and down the digivolution pathways in an attempt to reach your desired result while also gaining ABI and increasing my max level cap. Than raising so goddamn many. Though you do need to have discovered a specific digimon before you can devolve into it, so I guess all my scan farming had at least contributed to that.

I still remember my Digimon World 2 end game party of MetalSeadramon, Imperialdramon and WarGreymon. I wonder if I want to repeat that. Or should I just submit to my base desires and build a harem of Lilithmon and whoever else?

With a lot of them you genuinely need to do the up and down evolution cause the level they evolve at is beyond their initial max level. Also, pay attention to CAM which is needed for some evolutions and for DNA evolutions both digimon need 100 of it lol.

As for scan data, you'll end up with a bunch at 200 to a point where you just create spare digimon and feed them to your good ones as an exp boost. You don't need to worry too much over scanning since it builds pretty hard by itself. Also, I recommend trying the game on hard difficulty, it's a ton more fun and legit difficult.

Also, on a side note, isn't Nokia one of the funniest chars ever? She makes me laugh too much lol.

How necessary is it to minmax your digimon though? Often games like these allow you to grind and reach ludicrously high power levels that are completely unnecessary. I'm mostly raising ABI to discover Digimon I recognize and like. CAM isn't too hard to raise, just throw meat at them. Currently I'm also stuck on the gold cup, but each failed attempt gives me another Friendship EX which is basically more free CAM, so I might farm a bunch of those.

Knocking down my October playlist.

Replayed the Last Door. Basically is a Point and Click Adventure game that is a love letter to Lovecraft and a number of other early 20th century horror authors(Arthur Machens "The Great God Pan", Robert W Chambers "The King in Yellow") with some shoutouts to Poe and David Lynch(Yeah, I know Lynch is kind of the odd man out here). Graphically it looks like something made around 1990, and that will probably turn some people off right now. It also suffers from the standard drawbacks of classic adventure gaming such as what might as well be pixel hunting and puzzle solutions that sometimes don't make logical sense, so there's a bit of defaulting to "Rub every object on every other object hoping to trigger a solution" and sometimes the puzzles don't mesh with the plot at all(A hanged man, in a house all alone, is locked in an attic with the only key hidden in a stuffed cat. The attic door was locked from the outside, someone had to have hidden the key and yet the man was shown to have actually committed suicide, so apparently he set up an elaborate series of locked doors prior to taking his own life).

On the plus side, it's wonderfully atmospheric, even though a lot of the story tropes are fairly well trodden in Lovecraftian/Wierd Horror. And despite it's unsettling nature, it's designed well enough to not allow you to screw yourself. Hell, as far as I can tell, it's not possible to die in the game. Knowing that doesn't make it less creepy. It does that cryptic storytelling thing where you're gradually uncovering plot points and this does leave certain events open to interpretation, either a symptom of the main character going mad or the walls of reality starting to break down around the PC. Both seasons end up totaling about 8 hours, which is pretty reasonable for a game of this type.

Also Replayed Little Nightmares as it's DLC "Secrets of the Maw". The base game holds up very well, and still manages to be eerie and disturbing due to it's weird haunted dollhouse graphical ascetic, not to mention just how awful and bizarre the Maw and it's Denizens are. The puzzles mostly feel organic and mostly initiative, with most of the difficulty being evading capture in certain parts of the game(Notably the fucking Janitor, who is just unnerving in...well, just about everything).

The DLC I played for the first time and while it was fairly good, it didn't quite work as well as the base game did. Set during the same time period as the main game, it follows a different child mostly taking a different route through the maw, very occasionally referencing events from the base game. Unfortunately, some of the puzzles felt a little more contrived and derivative. Notably there's a puzzle where you have to gather a bunch of nomes together to reach the next area, by branching out from a central hub area to solve puzzles and bring them back. While not a bad idea, INSIDE had a puzzle sequence that did much the same thing and INSIDE came out a full year before Little Nightmares did, making it look suspiciously lifted.

There's also a series near the end where the main character has to defend himself against creepy "ghost childern" while are made of darkness by shining a flashlight on them for long enough so they don't reach and kill him. If this sounds familiar, Alan Wake did pretty much the same thing, and while I tolerated it in Alan Wake(I honestly didn't think Alan Wake was particularly great), it doesn't feel like it works nearly as well here and is a wholly unexpected gameplay change that doesn't add a lot other then frustration. The DLC doesn't end up adding much other then confirming where the nomes come from and what their purpose in in the Maw.

Wings012:

Dreiko:

Wings012:
And EXCEED is on the backburner. I've sunk 10+ hours into Cyber Sleuth. Haven't really been progressing much. I've been dicking around a lot, farming up digimon scan data. Definitely went a bit overboard, I have more digimon than I know what to do with. And if I want a specific digimon, I think it is more productive to go up and down the digivolution pathways in an attempt to reach your desired result while also gaining ABI and increasing my max level cap. Than raising so goddamn many. Though you do need to have discovered a specific digimon before you can devolve into it, so I guess all my scan farming had at least contributed to that.

I still remember my Digimon World 2 end game party of MetalSeadramon, Imperialdramon and WarGreymon. I wonder if I want to repeat that. Or should I just submit to my base desires and build a harem of Lilithmon and whoever else?

With a lot of them you genuinely need to do the up and down evolution cause the level they evolve at is beyond their initial max level. Also, pay attention to CAM which is needed for some evolutions and for DNA evolutions both digimon need 100 of it lol.

As for scan data, you'll end up with a bunch at 200 to a point where you just create spare digimon and feed them to your good ones as an exp boost. You don't need to worry too much over scanning since it builds pretty hard by itself. Also, I recommend trying the game on hard difficulty, it's a ton more fun and legit difficult.

Also, on a side note, isn't Nokia one of the funniest chars ever? She makes me laugh too much lol.

How necessary is it to minmax your digimon though? Often games like these allow you to grind and reach ludicrously high power levels that are completely unnecessary. I'm mostly raising ABI to discover Digimon I recognize and like. CAM isn't too hard to raise, just throw meat at them. Currently I'm also stuck on the gold cup, but each failed attempt gives me another Friendship EX which is basically more free CAM, so I might farm a bunch of those.

It's not at all necessary to minmax for ingame stuff. You'd only ever bother if you wanted to fight people online in the multiplayer part but I haven't bothered with it yet cause I'm doing the main story.

Trails of Cold Steel 2 is taking up all my time too, already put over 20 hours in the game and damn is it amazing. Those Valimar battles capture the mech feeling amazingly well too.

Started Salt and Sanctuary(finally) and just beat the first boss(not counting the Cthulhu looking one on the boat, who apparently is beatable, just the odds of doing so are extremely low). I can definitely see what people mean when they say "It's like Dark Souls, but 2D" because it very much wants to be Dark Souls. Not that there's anything wrong with that, because it does it well, it feels like. It has a few notable differences(the skill tree, the sanctuary system) but yeah, it's very similar to Dark Souls.

A few things do stand out in my mind. First is that it mostly feels Easier then Dark Souls did, with most of the enemies so far not feeling terribly threatening(as opposed to the trash mobs in DS which could easily wreck your shit) and leveling up with a few farming runs feels incredibly quick, at least compared to it's inspiration game, though checking the leveling chart for both games, apparently they aren't far off, so maybe I'm better at this type of game now?

I did run into a bit of a roadblock with the sodden knight, who kept wrecking me in the back half of the fight. He became much easier once I did some leveling up and realized he was vulnerable to firebombs(which conveniently are sold by a merchant you can access early). I'm still trying to get the hang of rolling past bosses on a 2D playing field, which somewhat complicates the time honored tactic of "get behind him and poke him in the butt a couple times, repeat until dead".

I also like the little touch of seeing the bodies of (presumably failed) other players hanging and on spikes outside of the dungeons, especially considering this games rather unique visual ascetic as far as characters are concerned. It does feel kinda wierd that you never really "die" in this game. Instead you basically get dragged back to the nearest bon....sanctuary, where the dude who did it only helps himself to 10% of any gold you have(which isn't very much in the grand scheme of things, losing all the salt and having to get it back hurts a lot more). Especially since the dude could have just as easily found your badly injured body and robbed you blind without you being unable to fight back. Unlike DS, there isn't even a health reduction involved.

But yeah, enjoying it quite a bit so far. Apparently certain builds are stupidly OP in this game(notably great-sword/hammer users), so I'll see soon enough.

Dreiko:

It's not at all necessary to minmax for ingame stuff. You'd only ever bother if you wanted to fight people online in the multiplayer part but I haven't bothered with it yet cause I'm doing the main story.

I can't even find anyone to fight online. I wanted to see what was up with it, but seems like nobody is playing the online mode much. You probably have to organize matches outside the game or you won't find one.

Minmaxing is a bit annoying cause it requires you to train at the farm, and that's just a waiting game. I did end up doing it a bunch to meet Digivolve stat requirements though.

I also ended up grinding up an absurd selection of Mega digimons anyway. I discovered PlatinumSukamons, which then led to PlatinumNumemons... on top of Tactician USBs. Getting 50k+ exp just leads to ridiculous leveling. I could probably make it better with the addition of a third PlatNume, but I've only done 2x PlatNume and mega that has a good AOE. I could probably digivolve my PlatNumes down another branch to pick up some generic AOE skills. But I think I've dicked around enough and should be able to clear the game comfortably. I'm on chapter 15 and have Lilithmon, Omnimon Zwart, RosemonBM, Jesmon, Piedmon, UlforceVeedramon, ImperialdramonPM, Sistermon C Awakened, Wargreymon, Ophanimon, Ouryumon... all at levels 80+

Some of the digimons are fairly disappointing. Imperialdramon PM isn't very good for all the trouble you need to go through to get him. The Omnimons just seem worse than Wargreymon. Seems like stuff with Penetrating attacks are just better.

Some though are pretty OP. Lilithmon was fairly troublesome to get due to her absurd INT requirement but oh lawd she's pretty bork. Capable of even oneshotting Vaccine types.

Qubed (360) - A 3 game compilation featuring Rez HD, E4, and Lumines Live. I bought it mainly for Rez, as I game store I happened to notice while coming home from work. Got it for $4. It's amazing how well Rez aged from the Dreamcast/PS2 era. Simple, yet fun, addicting, gameplay with a kick ass techno soundtrack. This is game you can play, invite people over, and have a rave party.

Dalisclock:
Started Salt and Sanctuary(finally) and just beat the first boss(not counting the Cthulhu looking one on the boat, who apparently is beatable, just the odds of doing so are extremely low). I can definitely see what people mean when they say "It's like Dark Souls, but 2D" because it very much wants to be Dark Souls. Not that there's anything wrong with that, because it does it well, it feels like. It has a few notable differences(the skill tree, the sanctuary system) but yeah, it's very similar to Dark Souls.

A few things do stand out in my mind. First is that it mostly feels Easier then Dark Souls did, with most of the enemies so far not feeling terribly threatening(as opposed to the trash mobs in DS which could easily wreck your shit) and leveling up with a few farming runs feels incredibly quick, at least compared to it's inspiration game, though checking the leveling chart for both games, apparently they aren't far off, so maybe I'm better at this type of game now?

I did run into a bit of a roadblock with the sodden knight, who kept wrecking me in the back half of the fight. He became much easier once I did some leveling up and realized he was vulnerable to firebombs(which conveniently are sold by a merchant you can access early). I'm still trying to get the hang of rolling past bosses on a 2D playing field, which somewhat complicates the time honored tactic of "get behind him and poke him in the butt a couple times, repeat until dead".

I also like the little touch of seeing the bodies of (presumably failed) other players hanging and on spikes outside of the dungeons, especially considering this games rather unique visual ascetic as far as characters are concerned. It does feel kinda wierd that you never really "die" in this game. Instead you basically get dragged back to the nearest bon....sanctuary, where the dude who did it only helps himself to 10% of any gold you have(which isn't very much in the grand scheme of things, losing all the salt and having to get it back hurts a lot more). Especially since the dude could have just as easily found your badly injured body and robbed you blind without you being unable to fight back. Unlike DS, there isn't even a health reduction involved.

But yeah, enjoying it quite a bit so far. Apparently certain builds are stupidly OP in this game(notably great-sword/hammer users), so I'll see soon enough.

You may find the mobs get a lot more threatening as you progress - I found that they could get out-beefed by leveling early on, but eventually that just doesn't work like it used to. Once you pass a certain point mobs get weird abilities and serious powerups that can't be effectively facetanked. After that all that remains is weapon choice and upgrades. There are definitely OP weapon builds, but they still require some kind of finesse, so I don't think its too bullshitty to take that approach.

Dalisclock:

I did run into a bit of a roadblock with the sodden knight, who kept wrecking me in the back half of the fight. He became much easier once I did some leveling up and realized he was vulnerable to firebombs(which conveniently are sold by a merchant you can access early). I'm still trying to get the hang of rolling past bosses on a 2D playing field, which somewhat complicates the time honored tactic of "get behind him and poke him in the butt a couple times, repeat until dead".

But yeah, enjoying it quite a bit so far. Apparently certain builds are stupidly OP in this game(notably great-sword/hammer users), so I'll see soon enough.

It gets a little trickier later on with the rolling. As the bosses (and some enemies) get bigger, also the rolling can be a little odd. Where you can only roll through the attack and not past the identical part otherwise.

As the enemy difficulty goes, there are way more miniboss esque types later on, along with environmental hazards to worry about. The Sodden Knight's crew are all pretty basic tutorial level stuff, and there's basically no environment to consider or status effects involved.

I don't think they ever did nerf out the Great Weapons ludicrous stagger abilities (the big time mage spell was the main target of such an effort, eventhough its one of the most ludicrous things to get in the game). To my recollection it was primarily greatsword's that benefitted, the hammers were still in the field of being overly slow as a compensation.

Outer Worlds and Dark Devotion. Is the '2D Souls-like' it's own sub-genre now? :p Not complaining as they are really fun. Dark Devotion is definitely one of the more challenging besides Salt & Sanct and Death's Gambit which all take most direct inspiration from Souls. But there's even been really great 2D crossovers of Souls and Symphony of the Night like Blasphemous or Dead Cells which is it's own thing entirely with it's rogue-like elements(which Dark Devotion also has). Then there is also Hollow Knight which is probably in my top 5 games this gen. Or Iga's Bloodstained. So much 2D goodness!! Indies really been knocking it out of the park.

Also picked up Return of Obra Dinn. The rave reviews and analysis by matthewmatosis and joseph anderson piqued my interest in the game.

Finished Code Vein this weekend and stated Outer Worlds. Code Vein was overall pretty good, and if I had to compare it to FROM's own games I would probably rate it at Dark Soul 2's level. Not as good as the rest, but a fun game in its own right. I'll probably play it again sometime soon.

Played about 8 hours of Outer Worlds so far and got off the first world. It has been fun so far. I do hope they put out a patch soon on the PC though. Seems like there are a few performance issues for them to sort out, especially if you go over 60fps.

FFXIV patch is coming out tomorrow!

stroopwafel:
Outer Worlds and Dark Devotion. Is the '2D Souls-like' it's own sub-genre now? :p Not complaining as they are really fun. Dark Devotion is definitely one of the more challenging besides Salt & Sanct and Death's Gambit which all take most direct inspiration from Souls. But there's even been really great 2D crossovers of Souls and Symphony of the Night like Blasphemous or Dead Cells which is it's own thing entirely with it's rogue-like elements(which Dark Devotion also has). Then there is also Hollow Knight which is probably in my top 5 games this gen. Or Iga's Bloodstained. So much 2D goodness!! Indies really been knocking it out of the park.

Also picked up Return of Obra Dinn. The rave reviews and analysis by matthewmatosis and joseph anderson piqued my interest in the game.

Return of the Obra Dinn is an excellent, unique experience and its hard to compare it to anything else but there's not really anything else I can think of that's like it. I mean, it's a mystery with time travel of a sort where you get snapshots of what happened and have to figure out who/what killed everyone, often using very oblique clues. You do end up treating each snapshot as a crime scene(frozen in time, not less) and it's kinda fascinating.

Dark Devotion is one of those games I keep looking at and trying to decide if I want it or not. I like the art style and it looks appropriately souls-like, but apparently it's more of a rouge-like and that tends to give me pause. I've yet to find a rogue-like I've really been able to get into(other then Sunless Sea, and you can kinda bypass that element of it using the options). Mostly it's the whole impression that most, if not all of your progress, gets wiped every time you die. If there's a way to incrementally make the game easier(carryover abilities/resources) each run, that kinda mitigates some of the worries I have. I just don't know if Dark Devotion makes it worth it and it's a game I didn't hear much about, well, at all. Like not much in the way of reviews when it ended up dropping(at least, not that I ended up seeing) or hype or anything. It just kinda flew under the radar so I don't know that much about it. Even the trailers don't seem to tell me much.

EvilRoy:

You may find the mobs get a lot more threatening as you progress - I found that they could get out-beefed by leveling early on, but eventually that just doesn't work like it used to. Once you pass a certain point mobs get weird abilities and serious powerups that can't be effectively facetanked. After that all that remains is weapon choice and upgrades. There are definitely OP weapon builds, but they still require some kind of finesse, so I don't think its too bullshitty to take that approach.

I've gotten a little bit further, past the Queen of Smiles and the Mad Alchemist(who was a joke, but apparently he's not supposed to be. I might have gotten super lucky with him) and I see what you mean. The Watching Woods had some tricky platforming and The Sunken keep has those xenomorph fuckers running around(who are easy to kill provided you hit first and don't get surrounded). I ran across a group of Saltless near the Village of Smiles and....yeah, those guys kicked my ass.

Still on Dying Light. The game becomes a bit unpleasant once you make it to Old Town. I don't know if this is tied to this particular moment in the game or not but suddenly Virals (the super fast zombies) are spawning everywhere and homing in on me without having the need to spot me or hear me. So now I can't explore freely anymore without having a conga of screaming crazies behind me and it's just made the game unpleasant after being OP for so long. Hopefully they go away past a certain plot point.

Just abandoned The Outer Worlds.

Not a huge loss as I got to play it with the trial of Xbox Game Pass that I used to play Gears 5, so no problems there.

Whilst I enjoyed the game initially, I came to realise that I had no real investment with any of the characters or the story, and I can't say that I enjoyed the gunplay all that much. Even though I did enjoy the super capitalist space setting, I couldn't justify spending another 20/30 hours wandering aimlessly trying to find the fun.

Maybe I will look into the game when it goes on sale or if I get Game Pass again, but I just don't think I enjoy this style of game as much as I used to.

Who knows what I am going to try next, but there are 147 games in my backlog.

Dalisclock:

Dark Devotion is one of those games I keep looking at and trying to decide if I want it or not. I like the art style and it looks appropriately souls-like, but apparently it's more of a rouge-like and that tends to give me pause. I've yet to find a rogue-like I've really been able to get into(other then Sunless Sea, and you can kinda bypass that element of it using the options). Mostly it's the whole impression that most, if not all of your progress, gets wiped every time you die. If there's a way to incrementally make the game easier(carryover abilities/resources) each run, that kinda mitigates some of the worries I have. I just don't know if Dark Devotion makes it worth it and it's a game I didn't hear much about, well, at all. Like not much in the way of reviews when it ended up dropping(at least, not that I ended up seeing) or hype or anything. It just kinda flew under the radar so I don't know that much about it. Even the trailers don't seem to tell me much.

I like the game a lot, so far it plays like a more methodical Blasphemous with it's overt religious themes. The rogue-like elements should probably be taken very loosely here as I haven't noticed changes in level lay-out just some enemy positions which on a 2D plane doesn't change the game much. It's true you start from scratch after every death with, as far as I know, no stat build-up but some weapons/equipment do seem to carry over including gameplay perks in the form of blessings. The combat is really enjoyable with impressive 2D 'tells' from the enemies but just like the game's systems the game doesn't really explain anything. Though, it's not really hard to figure out. Despite the game being pretty challenging it never really gets frustrating due to frequent unlocking of warp points that remain after death so you don't have to rush the entire game like Dead Cells. Boss design in particular is also really good and I also really like the art direction and use of lighting. Amazing what they are able to pull off with such limited means, often providing more genuinely creative results than it's high production counterparts.

Only played a few hours so far but definitely pretty good. I'd put it above Death's Gambit and in a similar league as Salt & Sanct and Blasphemous. For depth of play I think Dark Devotion is probaly the best as it feels more meticulously crafted but that will probably also push people away as it isn't what they expect in a 2D game. But yeah, definitely an innovative title. Sad to see no media outlet seems to even acknowledge it's existence. :(

stroopwafel:

Only played a few hours so far but definitely pretty good. I'd put it above Death's Gambit and in a similar league as Salt & Sanct and Blasphemous. For depth of play I think Dark Devotion is probaly the best as it feels more meticulously crafted but that will probably also push people away as it isn't what they expect in a 2D game. But yeah, definitely an innovative title. Sad to see no media outlet seems to even acknowledge it's existence. :(

Yeah, I occasionally saw comparisons with it and Blasphemous, partially in theme being on the other side of the "Religion is positive/negative" coin. I am curious how Blasphemous got a lot more press though, considering it's not like the Games Kitchen was a heavy hitter studio before they made Blasphemous. Don't get me wrong, I really liked The Last Door(and a recent replay reminded me it does a lot of things right despite it's flaws), but it didn't exactly make the world stand up and take notice.

Maybe Blasphemous dropped in a dead period and DD didn't or something? Or Dark Devotion didn't have a giant baby in it?

Dalisclock:

stroopwafel:

Only played a few hours so far but definitely pretty good. I'd put it above Death's Gambit and in a similar league as Salt & Sanct and Blasphemous. For depth of play I think Dark Devotion is probaly the best as it feels more meticulously crafted but that will probably also push people away as it isn't what they expect in a 2D game. But yeah, definitely an innovative title. Sad to see no media outlet seems to even acknowledge it's existence. :(

Yeah, I occasionally saw comparisons with it and Blasphemous, partially in theme being on the other side of the "Religion is positive/negative" coin. I am curious how Blasphemous got a lot more press though, considering it's not like the Games Kitchen was a heavy hitter studio before they made Blasphemous. Don't get me wrong, I really liked The Last Door(and a recent replay reminded me it does a lot of things right despite it's flaws), but it didn't exactly make the world stand up and take notice.

Maybe Blasphemous dropped in a dead period and DD didn't or something? Or Dark Devotion didn't have a giant baby in it?

Yeah, I think it's mostly the artstyle and simplicity of Blasphemous. The game's graphics are colorful and crisp and pop out more. Blasphemous truly has some outrageous art. Gameplay is also regular 2D fare and if you ever played a Castlevania game you're right at home. If you have only one big media outlet that loves the game(in Blasphemous case it was IGN I believe who came with an early preview) or *gasp* 'influencer' it gets the ball rolling. Dark Devotion with it's muted colors, archaic systems and methodical gameplay is more like a niche within a niche. Death's Gambit also received very little coverage though I put Dark Devotion a league above. The busy fall season probably also played a part, yeah.

Surprisingly though these 2D indie games scratch the Souls itch better for me than say Code Vein or The Surge. Which I didn't like, at all.

stroopwafel:
Death's Gambit also received very little coverage though I put Dark Devotion a league above. The busy fall season probably also played a part, yeah.

Surprisingly though these 2D indie games scratch the Souls itch better for me than say Code Vein or The Surge. Which I didn't like, at all.

You mentioned art style, I can say for myself, Death's Gambit kind of struck me as art that was done in its low-ressy pixel fashion because the design/artist weren't up to chops. S&S isn't edxactly ambitous or hyper detailed, but the presentation is at least clean. IF you're gonna go blocky pixels, you need to be very very good at it to not just come of kind off lackluster or nostalgia chasing.

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 . . . 54 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Posting on this forum is disabled.