What games are you playing?

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Fappy:

Chimpzy:
Tokyo Mirage Sessions FE# Encore

I am a big fan of SMT/Persona and FE, so I would probably enjoy it.

It's also your only option for a SMT fix on Switch for the forseeable future. Tho I'm not implying lack of choice means you're settling.

Afaik SMT5 is still in development, but there's been nothing concrete since the original announcement.

Chimpzy:

Fappy:

Chimpzy:
Tokyo Mirage Sessions FE# Encore

I am a big fan of SMT/Persona and FE, so I would probably enjoy it.

It's also your only option for a SMT fix on Switch for the forseeable future. Tho I'm not implying lack of choice means you're settling.

Afaik SMT5 is still in development, but there's been nothing concrete since the original announcement.

I think we're still waiting for SMT V until at least 2021. Who knows how long the western localization will take on top of that :(

Asita:

Dalisclock:

Asita:
Well, I was recently gifted the Witcher 3...so I decided that I'd finally actually play through the Witcher 1, which has been sitting in my library for a few years now, as I gave up my first attempt pretty quickly. Figure I should probably play through the first two games before I play 3.

Good luck. The first game is really rough and is not easy to like. The plot is good but god there's a lot of other places the game needs work, most of all the combat system.

I'd personally recommend just skipping to Witcher 2 and watching a LP of the first game, but otherwise I'd recommend dumping a lot of skill points into IGNI(the fire spell). It works in almost all situations and by god you're gonna need the help.

Yeah, I remember you mentioning that in another thread, and my understanding has long been that the Witcher 1 is easily the weakest installment. On the other hand, it's also my understanding that the Witcher series has a carryover feature, and I'm a stickler for that kind of thing (see Mass Effect, Dragon Age, Golden Sun, the LoZ Oracle games (if you count those), etc).

That being said, this is a case where I felt it wise to have a finger to a guide so as to minimize the rockiness. So it's less that I'm having difficulty with the game than it is that the pacing feels atrocious due to the obligatory 'grind out a few levels before you complete the quests' segments. For instance, I think I was level 11 whenI finally made it to the Temple Quarter (starting Chapter 2), and was advised to start farming Graviers in the sewer crypts until I hit level 15. So that's a few hours of fighting 4 monsters, running back to the campfire, meditating for an hour to refresh their spawns and repeating, with occasional runs up to the Slums to earn a small amount of extra coin by boxing. Perils of being overcautious, perhaps. Still, the fact that grinding is recommended at all speaks to some of the game's mechanical issues.

I know I tend to bring it up a bit. It's not a bad game but I remember it feeling very clunky and some parts were downright infuriating to fight and survive through so I guess some of the negatives have stuck with me more then the parts I liked. I remember having a consistently much better time with the sequels and considering the first game gets almost forgotten after a while it feels like the most expendable of the lot.

As for the carryover save, I don't remember what you get out of it other then the 2nd game remembers some of your decisions(which don't matter once 3 rolls around) and you start with a slightly better sword in the sequel.

Darkwood, after eyeing it up over half a year trying to figure out if it would be a regrettable purchase, finally gave in to the urges. And, well, not half bad so far. Got the darkest of dark atmosphere which is one those elements that throws itself at you as soon as the game starts so you're in no doubt what sort of time you're gonna be in for. Finally a mood to match the feeling of everyday waking consciousness! Would love to see a version in future with appropriate voice acting to suit it, but text-only is fine as it is.

It really feels like the precise sort of mood I been looking for in a horror game, and it promotes itself as a horror without jumpscares; also a respectable move. However am not sure they took into account someone with my stupidity using loud headphones and jumping at birds flapping, getting accidentally caught in my own bear trap and finally walking into a chair I didn't notice, making an awfully loud scraping sound when least expected. Was tired though. The atmosfear was about the only thing keeping the eyes open. Will continue nonetheless!

Neurotic Void Melody:
The atmosfear!

You so wrote it like that on purpose. J'accuse...!

Chimpzy:

Neurotic Void Melody:
The atmosfear!

You so wrote it like that on purpose. J'accuse...!

J'offended you'd conjure up such defaming hearsay and conjecture as if I had no respect for the conservation of the sacred colonial language and would throw together words haphazardly just cos it saves a few extra spaces and seconds with no thought towards translation issues. J'offended!

Replaying a couple older games alongside Sekiro, partially as a way to step back and refocus and also because I know I'm gonna be working Sekiro for a while and I need to feel I'm clearing my backlog at the same time(which tends to cause issues with longer games because after a while I feel like that list just just getting longer).

Replayed Journeyman Project 2:Buried in Time.

For a series about time travel it feels like they did a reasonably good job of trying to justify it without fucking up the future/present by changing the past. Partially because part of your job as Temporal Security(essentially the Time Police) is to prevent serious changes to the timeline. The 2nd game clarifies that some changes(spilling some water, for example) aren't big enough to make a difference, and also sends you to areas where your presence won't really affect anything(unless you do something stupid) while the 3rd game gives you more freedom to interact by having you use a special time travel suit that allows you to disguise yourself using the image of someone local(and then using holo-projectors to create the illusion of being that person). Granted, there still some inherent weirdness in the first 2 games of the series where you would start each time period from the same spot and even warp in at the same moment considering you'd see the same animations and encounters each time(JP2 in particular, you'd always arrive at a castle under attack by appearing front of a guard, who would attempt to sound the alarm and immediately take an arrow to the back and die. You would see this every time you arrived, but somehow bumping into yourself is never a risk).

Following from the first game, JP2: Buried in Time moves on from the "Someone fucked with the past and changed the present for their own gain, now unfuck it to restore the proper timeline" to "Someone framed your future self for messing around with history(not seriously though), use his time suit and prove his(and thus your) innocence". Instead of having to jump to your HQ/Base every time you need to swap time periods(which you need to do often because you need things from one time period to use in another), you now have a self contained time suit that allows you to jump back and forth directly(though back in the day this game was on mutiple CD-ROMS so you needed to switch discs each time you jumped). You also get some fun new tools such as a cloaking device(which only works if you stand still, but you're trying to hide if you use it so it works) and a universal translator. The game also has some nice QOL improvements over the first game including better movement , the ability to skip past cutscenes(thank god) and indicators to tell you what directions you can turn and move(as opposed the first game where it was anyone's guess if you could move forward or not, normally not known until you bumped into a wall)

The Time periods(a recently damaged space station in the 23rd century, a French castle in the hundred years war, a temple during the Mayan golden age and Leonardo DaVinci's Milanese workshop at night) are more interesting and generally built to justify you not getting noticed by the locals(and no doubt to make it easier to run on the computers of the era). The caste is possibly the most interesting take on these because the fall of the castle is in progress as you arrive, so most of the castles defenders are hiding or actively fighting it out. Your time suit also looks a bit like a medieval suit of armor from a distance though any knights you do encounter automatically assume you're an enemy knight because they don't recognize the armor and thus try to kill you.

Puzzles feel a bit more initiative, with a few bits which feel a bit weird. Like the previous game, object from one period need to be used in another so jumping between periods is required. Generally you can figure out what to do by exploring as much as you can safely and using the tools available to you(a couple puzzles require watching the in-game news and ordering stuff off the (in-game)internet based on commercials you see, which may not be obvious).

As was typical of the era, video clips were used with computer graphics which look.....ok nowadays with that being considered. I remember playing this at the time and it looked really good but some of the environments look fairly artificial now, while the video clips are generally fine. There's some annoying bits where finding the right thing to click on bars your progress far more then any of the puzzles, even if you know what you need to do. It's also fairly possible to die for dumb reasons, though at least this time it felt more like you made a dumb move rather then you blundered into the wrong room with no way to know what you did wrong. And if nothing else, the death scenes were far more entertaining(one of them being a pure shout out to Monty Python and the Holy Grail, where some English Soldiers drop a cow on your head because they think you're an invading french knight)

The idea of actually getting to explore history is arguably the best hook the game has(and something the first game sorely lacked, as all it's locations were in the future relative to us but also strangely not terribly interesting) and this game came out a decade before Assassins Creed let you do it on a much wider scale(and with more freedom) and I honestly wouldn't mind seeing this remade someday with a larger scope. I doubt it will happen since Ubisoft likely owns the rights and god I do not want to see them ubisoft this game up. Each location does kinda feel like it could be a real place even if the presentation hasn't aged super well and it does edge into edutainment considering how much you can learn about a given time period from an AI companion you pick up early in the game(who lives in a computer check in your timesuit). A bit of this information does help in solving the puzzles too.

It also has a rather cool moment near the end when you've gathered enough evidence on the person who framed you when they decided to capture you first and explain why they did what they did. It comes across as one of the better "I did what I felt I had to do" motivations I've seen in a while and does a lot of close out the story. It does help if you take advantage of the video clips and in-game news stories you can access from any point in the game which give you a lot of context behind what's going on, notably that the fact Humans are the only species to possess Time Travel technology and the other members of the federation Earth belongs to have notably mixed feelings about this. The fact that time travel was already attempted to alter the past once is also a well known fact only feeds into this. You don't get to directly participate in this debate but it does notably become important later in the game, where certain species are very much questioning "Why do humans get sole power of time travel when one of their own already tried to abuse it for personal gain?"

After that, moved into Journeyman Project 3: Legacy of time.

The last game in the series in some ways is the best of the lot including a streamlined interface, larger and more interesting looking time zones with a bit less time zone jumping(they can be completed mostly from things you find in the same time zone). Part of this is due to not having to deal with indiviual suit functions one at a time(so you don't have to go to a chip in your inventory just to save a game) and can focus more on the environment and puzzle solving. Notably, you also can't die or reach a fail state at all, which means you can experiment more but no longer get the cool looking death scenes.

The game also includes a new time travel suit that projects a holographic image of someone and thus allows you to interact and talk to people you meet(the big limitation being you can't walk up to someone looking like them because it understandably freaks them out). This opens up some interesting combinations where you can go talk to people wearing different disguises and get different dialogue(and it's sometimes required to do this). Generally people have reasons not to move around so there's little chance they'll go around talking to each other and thus figuring out someone is impersonating them. Though like the previous game, the locations only have a half dozen npcs each, no doubt due to resources(though generally justified in game).

The premise is the best part, being that after the events of the last game, an alien fleet appears at the edges of known space and begins a headlong rush towards Earth. At the same time, it's revealed that 3 legendary cities(Atlantis, Shangri-la and El Dorado) were real and were wiped clean from the earth by aliens(one set of whom the invading fleet belongs so). You arrive at each city just after it has been destroyed and after some tutorial puzzles are informed an even older race of alien left magical space mcguffins which helped these particular civilizations rise to power, only to be wiped out when later ones decided to fight over them, with the cities being wiped out to prevent them from falling into the hands of the other race. It's a partially interesting, partially meh take on the ancient astronaut theory, since it's implied only these cities really benefited and generally didn't influence the rest of the world much due to their destruction. You need to find the mcguffins to stop the invading aliens blah blah blah.

So to find the various mcguffins, known as the Legacy, you have go back in time to the day before they get wiped out to perform your search. This neatly allows to engage in some interactions you wouldn't be able to get away with in other games and adds a sense of foreboding because you realize that no matter what you do, pretty much every character you meet in your travels will be dead in less then 24 hours and there's nothing you can do to prevent it.

The game is probably most notable due to the fact the various legendary cities generally have technology that seems advanced but not terriby unrealistic for the setting and time period. Atlantis uses a series of locks and windmills to pump water out of the city and reclaim more land, El Dorado uses balloons as transport and apparently for warfare and Shangri La is built over a series of natural hot springs and steam vents to keep the place nice and toasty despite being high in the Himalayas. It speaks to the game designers for doing a pretty good amount of research, despite the "Aliens destroyed the place" and "Magical McGuffins left by other aliens" plot points.

Still being a 20 year old game, the environments look a bit artificial due to the heavy use of computer graphics and it can be off-putting and most of the joy comes from wandering around a simulation of what these civilizations(if they had existed) could have looked like and getting to interact with the people there. While the cast is small(per time zone) they feel like they're there for a purpose and get a decent amount of not terrible dialogue(half of the puzzles involve getting the the right dialogue out of them to proceed), some of it about their myths and legends. Shangri La has a very notable emphasis on Buddhism, but the others are likely made up for the game.

The weirdest bit is that the various mythologies/legends within the time zones seem to be almost like prophecy to the overriding plot of aliens fighting each other over earth and repeatedly bringing destruction in their wake, where you naturally end up playing the role of the chosen one because of course you do. That and the ending adds a weird supernatural element(or Clarke's third law, however you want to put it) that feels out of place in the series and feels like they were setting up for a sequel. However, the last game was made over 20 years ago and it's doubtful any sequel will ever exist at this point, so now it just comes across as weird.

Just finished playing The World Ends With You.

Definitely one of the most unique and memorable games I've played. The main characters (except Joshua) were all very likable, Neku's development over the game was nice to watch, the character designs were vibrant and consistent, with even the shopkeepers and random NPCs walking around standing out, and the soundtrack was fantastic.

Gameplay was very interesting and utilised the DS's features extensively, both good and bad. The dual screen aspect was difficult to use at first, and while I did get used to it I did find myself just mashing left/right for the top screen most of the time. Pins were a great mechanic, though my biggest criticism of them was how certain inputs were much more difficult to perform (draw a circle, 'scratch' the screen etc.) and sometimes they overlapped which was annoying. Other annoyances included unskippable cutscenes and how bosses would sometimes sporing out of nowhere during a time when you might have a bad pin set up that doesn't work well with bosses. That said I still give props to the designers for coming up with such a distinctive battle system in a genre that often feels very samey. I also really appreciate that the game features a detailed 'chapter select' feature for new game plus, those are always very nice.

Overall, despite my complaints, TWEWY was a very unique and extraordinary game that oozed character and was clearly made with passion. I would be very happy to see it get a sequel or spiritual successor that irons out some of the issues I had.

Decided I needed a way to exercise that feeds off my natural addictive tendencies.

To that end, I now own a Quest VR machine and Beat Saber. Its perplexingly simple in concept - wave lightsabers around to break flying blocks to the beat of a song - but its startlingly deep once you get cooking. The actual campaign starts off as a tutorial on how to play the game and some stuff you can do, but then takes a trip to crazy town where you might pass or fail for missing too few targets, or getting too high of a combo. I got a little irritated with it a short way in because I just wanted the campaign to be a steady ramp up in difficulty and length of song and whatnot, and I was getting hamstrung by one level requiring a huge amount of arm movement to pass (it tracks the distance your arms move for these), with one following where I had to win by hooking my thumbs into my hoodie pockets and doing a stupid little dance because it allowed a maximum movement.

Luckily, I learned that solo mode is where the awesome happens. Dozens of songs, with more to purchase, set the difficulty however you want, up the speed, turn off fail so you keep going even if you flub a section, and then rock on out. I've seen the quest version can be modded with a little effort to play a bunch of fan made levels, and I'm looking into it for long-term replayability. Check out carameldansen. The author set it up so you do the dance to get through the level. Solo doesn't save you from all the bullshit though - a bunch of songs have sections where what you do is more akin to giving someone a rapid limp handshake as opposed to any particularly rad saberninjaing.

I've added a set of wrist weights to my workout and its surprising how quickly my arms have started to tone up. I'm planning to get a belt as well to help kick up the exercise.

Been into Sekiro this weekend after hitting the brick wall known as Yhorm the Giant in Dark Souls 3; or at least that's how it seems as I essentially do mere chip damage to this behemoth. Not keen on wiki'ing a weakness as I've been going guide free for progression at least.

Anyways I had beaten Genichiro...or at least thought so until he whipped out his lightning form. That'd be the first triple health boss for me. Lady Butterfly wasn't half this demanding back when I was at 11 Vit and 2 AP; maybe because she's seen better days? I'm at 13 VIT and 3 AP now but the only other things I can do at this point are probably heading further into Sunken Valley or take out Headless. He seems to be even a rougher go though, especially after ringing the bell.

I sent the Ashina vendor to the temple but probably can find a couple better attachments. I also gave pinwheels to that creepy monk under the tree in the Senpou Temple map, which is so far my favorite area in the game both aesthetically and design-wise. I'm missing something though as all I can do is refuse his request.

Bloodborne. Made a thread about asking for any assistance avoiding getting Souls'd with missable content and points of no return. This was a recurring pain during my first run of Demon's Souls but turns out Bloodborne is more forgiving in that regard. As usual, nothing beyond basic controls is explained in any detail (like how insight and chalice dungeons work) but there's nothing as major as world tendencies or character tendencies to map out or worry about. Also there's no equivalent to Boss Souls that could only be consumed once in order to learn one out of two spells/miracles, or make one out of three possible weapons, meaning unless you're using a dupe glitch you'd have to run as many times through the game in order to complete any checklist.

Frankly I've had way of an easier time playing Bloodborne than anything I've played by From Software. You have hardcore fans talking about builds but really none of it matters. Stats usually grant the same perks, rather acting as gates that enable the use of weapons. But there's little cause to use different weapons, and none of them can be upgraded in different ways with different materials: there's only one road for each and they all operate on the same materials that quickly become vendor trash as soon as you get everything to +3 or +6. Neither does the armor make much difference. At most I change clothes for specialized resistance (fire, poison, whatever) here and there but as far as preventing physical damage goes they're all more or less in the same ballpark.

There's an unusual amount of piece of cake bosses. I killed Cleric Beast, Witch of Hemwick, The One Reborn, Celestial Emissary, Micolash and several chalice bosses all in one go. Amelia took a couple of tries. Rom and Amygdala were mostly a test of patience. Crow of Cainhurst I just cheesed with poison. The toughest fights were Gascoigne early on and the beasts (Paarl and Blood-Starved). Right now I'm stuck on Ebrietas and Logarius, whom I reckon are some of the hardest bosses in the game. I just know from the difficulty that they're probably optional but I'm still having a go at them.

I'm also playing Mercenaries 2 in between, cause why the hell not. I remember suffering the PS2 port back in the day. Bought the PS3 version out of spite a couple of years ago and never played it. Figured Just Cause had made that series all but obsolete. And yeah, it's basically Just Cause in a map half the size and without half the stuff that made it really fun (grappling hook and parachute), although I like the bounty hunting aspect of it. Maybe it's better balanced than Just Cause as well, cause I find myself relying more frequently on supply drops and air strikes, which is somehow more satisfying.

Warriors Orochi 4: *SIGH* Bit of a sad reason as to this one. I learned that Kingdom Under Fire 2 was now a thing, and was all "HOT DAMN, I get my 1 vs many hack and slash WITH awesome tactics and some customization for the first time since the OG Xbox" fix. I was so jazzed. Then I learned it was a pay to win online only MMO. Once again I find myself slouching back to the Musou series for that fix. It's good if you're okay with the cliche's about the franchise at this point and I'm not disappointed.

Johnny Novgorod:
I killed Cleric Beast, Witch of Hemwick, The One Reborn, Celestial Emissary, Micolash and several chalice bosses all in one go. Amelia took a couple of tries. Rom and Amygdala were mostly a test of patience. Crow of Cainhurst I just cheesed with poison. The toughest fights were Gascoigne early on and the beasts (Paarl and Blood-Starved). Right now I'm stuck on Ebrietas and Logarius, whom I reckon are some of the hardest bosses in the game. I just know from the difficulty that they're probably optional but I'm still having a go at them.

It was mixed for me. Cleric Beast and Amelia were one shots for me, Witch was another one shot but her duplicate made it harder then it really should be(and they can heal each other), I got Blood starved in one go(but died to posion right after, so I hard to run all the way back to claim the reward but luckily not fight again). ROM was annoying due to the ton o'spiders hanging out around her,

Crow was a royal pain who I ended up cheesing with posion(after baiting him with his chiklage attack), Shadows I hated due to their gank boss nature(3 vs 1 and they get harder as you wear down their health bars). Micolash I hate with a passion mostly due to how you have to chase the fucker twice each time you fight him and it's fairly random when he turns the right direction to his boss arena, so you potentially waste a ton of time chasing him before the fights. When I found out you can cheese him with poison I gladly did so and don't regret it. If BB ever gets a PC port, I would love a "Micolash can get fucked" mod.

Dalisclock:

Johnny Novgorod:
I killed Cleric Beast, Witch of Hemwick, The One Reborn, Celestial Emissary, Micolash and several chalice bosses all in one go. Amelia took a couple of tries. Rom and Amygdala were mostly a test of patience. Crow of Cainhurst I just cheesed with poison. The toughest fights were Gascoigne early on and the beasts (Paarl and Blood-Starved). Right now I'm stuck on Ebrietas and Logarius, whom I reckon are some of the hardest bosses in the game. I just know from the difficulty that they're probably optional but I'm still having a go at them.

It was mixed for me. Cleric Beast and Amelia were one shots for me, Witch was another one shot but her duplicate made it harder then it really should be(and they can heal each other), I got Blood starved in one go(but died to posion right after, so I hard to run all the way back to claim the reward but luckily not fight again). ROM was annoying due to the ton o'spiders hanging out around her,

Crow was a royal pain who I ended up cheesing with posion(after baiting him with his chiklage attack), Shadows I hated due to their gank boss nature(3 vs 1 and they get harder as you wear down their health bars). Micolash I hate with a passion mostly due to how you have to chase the fucker twice each time you fight him and it's fairly random when he turns the right direction to his boss arena, so you potentially waste a ton of time chasing him before the fights. When I found out you can cheese him with poison I gladly did so and don't regret it. If BB ever gets a PC port, I would love a "Micolash can get fucked" mod.

I think I just got lucky with Micolash. I only had to chase him twice. The third time I found him he was standing behind a gate that I *think* I was supposed to open but my attacks reached through the gate just fine and killed him without further ado.

The Shadow of Yharnam was a pain the first few tries. Luckily I didn't die to the massive Lovecraftian fuck you the last Shadow casts as a last resort. Wouldn't have wanted to go into battle again, knowing *that* was going to be the final step.

Rom is designed to be annoying. Maybe there's a build that can tank 30 spiders at once but the only way I could go through the battle was killing one at a time, which takes forever and feels frustrating because Rom itself doesn't seem to pack that much HP. The whole fight feels like it's been especially designed to test players' greediness. On the other hand the second fight in the chalice dungeon was a piece of cake since you can use the pillars to de-aggro the spiders and block Rom's long range attacks.

Any tips for Logarius and Ebrietas? Don't know how much of a difference it makes but I'm Lv. 91, have a 10+ axe, 8+ holy blade and everything else is anywhere between 5+ and 7+.

Johnny Novgorod:

Any tips for Logarius and Ebrietas? Don't know how much of a difference it makes but I'm Lv. 91, have a 10+ axe, 8+ holy blade and everything else is anywhere between 5+ and 7+.

Many of Logarius' attacks can be parried, and some have pretty big parry windows (like the attack when he flies into the air). Also whenever he stabs his sword into the ground quickly go up to it and hit it once to get rid of the summoned swords.

As for Ebrietas try to stick behind her and keep moving so as to avoid her charge attack, or alternatively get in front of her and use any weapon with an overhead attack and try to hit her in the head (eventually you'll stun her and can perform a visceral). When she summons the lasers circle strafe and don't dodge too early, and whenever she raises her arms slowly get ready to dodge away.

Journey to the Savage Planet.

Which essentially boils down to kind of a single-player Metroidvania esque take on No MAns Sky, albeit with a bit more of a humor slant on the story.

Also a single linear campagin (obviously I don't think you could procedurally make a Metroidvania, or at the least it'd be silly)

It is engaging enough thus far, given my campaign progress based on time, it may be a bit short. And doesn't appear to delve too deeply into the crafting/survival mechanics, so I wouldn't recommend it for that particular genre style.

Johnny Novgorod:

Dalisclock:

Johnny Novgorod:
I killed Cleric Beast, Witch of Hemwick, The One Reborn, Celestial Emissary, Micolash and several chalice bosses all in one go. Amelia took a couple of tries. Rom and Amygdala were mostly a test of patience. Crow of Cainhurst I just cheesed with poison. The toughest fights were Gascoigne early on and the beasts (Paarl and Blood-Starved). Right now I'm stuck on Ebrietas and Logarius, whom I reckon are some of the hardest bosses in the game. I just know from the difficulty that they're probably optional but I'm still having a go at them.

It was mixed for me. Cleric Beast and Amelia were one shots for me, Witch was another one shot but her duplicate made it harder then it really should be(and they can heal each other), I got Blood starved in one go(but died to posion right after, so I hard to run all the way back to claim the reward but luckily not fight again). ROM was annoying due to the ton o'spiders hanging out around her,

Crow was a royal pain who I ended up cheesing with posion(after baiting him with his chiklage attack), Shadows I hated due to their gank boss nature(3 vs 1 and they get harder as you wear down their health bars). Micolash I hate with a passion mostly due to how you have to chase the fucker twice each time you fight him and it's fairly random when he turns the right direction to his boss arena, so you potentially waste a ton of time chasing him before the fights. When I found out you can cheese him with poison I gladly did so and don't regret it. If BB ever gets a PC port, I would love a "Micolash can get fucked" mod.

I think I just got lucky with Micolash. I only had to chase him twice. The third time I found him he was standing behind a gate that I *think* I was supposed to open but my attacks reached through the gate just fine and killed him without further ado.

The Shadow of Yharnam was a pain the first few tries. Luckily I didn't die to the massive Lovecraftian fuck you the last Shadow casts as a last resort. Wouldn't have wanted to go into battle again, knowing *that* was going to be the final step.

Rom is designed to be annoying. Maybe there's a build that can tank 30 spiders at once but the only way I could go through the battle was killing one at a time, which takes forever and feels frustrating because Rom itself doesn't seem to pack that much HP. The whole fight feels like it's been especially designed to test players' greediness. On the other hand the second fight in the chalice dungeon was a piece of cake since you can use the pillars to de-aggro the spiders and block Rom's long range attacks.

Any tips for Logarius and Ebrietas? Don't know how much of a difference it makes but I'm Lv. 91, have a 10+ axe, 8+ holy blade and everything else is anywhere between 5+ and 7+.

Shadows took a bit for me, as did Gascoigne. They were probably the most testing in NG aside from later chalice dungeons.

Logarius is a nightmare without parrying. Watch for his openings which should be no problem if you've already done chalice bosses. Also when he hunkers down at about 60% health he's getting ready to unleash hell, so do a charged R2 behind his back to stagger and follow up with a visceral. You won't have much time though so stay close and try to keep him away from any walls since he won't leave you any room. IIRC it's possible to stagger him up front too but it never worked as well for me. The rest of the fight is trivial if he never gets into his full second phase.

Ebriettas was no problem in the main game, but in cursed dungeon she was also a nightmare. It helps dodging to the left and very late when she charges (or just rush in right from the gate to avoid triggering her charge attack) to avoid getting one-shot, but there isn't much else that makes that fight easy for me. Those tentacles are too unpredictably gangly and she fights dirty. Even standing behind she somehow maneuvers into better position. She can be staggered with certain weapons to the head that have the range or piercing especially.

As for weapon builds in Bloodborne vs Souls, effectiveness is certainly defined by appropriate upgrade paths and possibly even more-so, but yeah the end result is still the overall AR. Blood gems can help get the most out of chosen stat paths and status effects.

Johnny Novgorod:

Dalisclock:

Johnny Novgorod:
I killed Cleric Beast, Witch of Hemwick, The One Reborn, Celestial Emissary, Micolash and several chalice bosses all in one go. Amelia took a couple of tries. Rom and Amygdala were mostly a test of patience. Crow of Cainhurst I just cheesed with poison. The toughest fights were Gascoigne early on and the beasts (Paarl and Blood-Starved). Right now I'm stuck on Ebrietas and Logarius, whom I reckon are some of the hardest bosses in the game. I just know from the difficulty that they're probably optional but I'm still having a go at them.

It was mixed for me. Cleric Beast and Amelia were one shots for me, Witch was another one shot but her duplicate made it harder then it really should be(and they can heal each other), I got Blood starved in one go(but died to posion right after, so I hard to run all the way back to claim the reward but luckily not fight again). ROM was annoying due to the ton o'spiders hanging out around her,

Crow was a royal pain who I ended up cheesing with posion(after baiting him with his chiklage attack), Shadows I hated due to their gank boss nature(3 vs 1 and they get harder as you wear down their health bars). Micolash I hate with a passion mostly due to how you have to chase the fucker twice each time you fight him and it's fairly random when he turns the right direction to his boss arena, so you potentially waste a ton of time chasing him before the fights. When I found out you can cheese him with poison I gladly did so and don't regret it. If BB ever gets a PC port, I would love a "Micolash can get fucked" mod.

I think I just got lucky with Micolash. I only had to chase him twice. The third time I found him he was standing behind a gate that I *think* I was supposed to open but my attacks reached through the gate just fine and killed him without further ado.

The Shadow of Yharnam was a pain the first few tries. Luckily I didn't die to the massive Lovecraftian fuck you the last Shadow casts as a last resort. Wouldn't have wanted to go into battle again, knowing *that* was going to be the final step.

Rom is designed to be annoying. Maybe there's a build that can tank 30 spiders at once but the only way I could go through the battle was killing one at a time, which takes forever and feels frustrating because Rom itself doesn't seem to pack that much HP. The whole fight feels like it's been especially designed to test players' greediness. On the other hand the second fight in the chalice dungeon was a piece of cake since you can use the pillars to de-aggro the spiders and block Rom's long range attacks.

Any tips for Logarius and Ebrietas? Don't know how much of a difference it makes but I'm Lv. 91, have a 10+ axe, 8+ holy blade and everything else is anywhere between 5+ and 7+.

Ebrietas I beat but I don't remember much about how I beat her. I think I used the lighting mace and made use of the summon inside the doorway, but don't remember much beyond that. Can't help with Longarius. I tried him a couple times but eventually said screw that and decided not to bother trying to beat him. Apparently if you can parry him he goes down a lot easier.

Shadows are worse then you realize. When one Shadow has been damaged below the 40% threshold, they will all transform gaining additional abilities.When 2 are dead, or 1 is dead and the remaining reached 30% health, the survivors will gain the lovecraftian murdersnake attack. Keep in mind you're facing 3 fuckers at the same time so you can imagine how dicey that gets if you're not really good at crowd control. You can see why I use the term "Gank Boss".

Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis.

Because I'm on a retro kick right now I've been replaying some old favorites and Indy FOA was one of my first favorites from when I was a kid. Despite not having played it in over a decade(and now able to due to SCUMMVM/GOG), it still holds up nicely. Lucasarts had a well deserved reputation for making quality point and click adventure games(to the point they were considered the king of that particular hill for a long while) and this is a prime example of why.

It's a game that successfully takes an action/adventure franchise and turns it into a mostly puzzle based game. It does what a good Indy movie does, minus the action bits/chase scenes. In some ways it's far better then it's sequels(Infernal Machine tried and missed the mark somewhat, feeling like a mediocre tomb raider knockoff and Emperor's tomb was apparently ok) and arguably had better writing then the one movie we do not speak of(because it doesn't exist and I will fight anyone who says otherwise).

The premise is fairly simple: It's 1939 and the nazis have a new pet project. Finding lost city of Atlantis. More precisely, finding it's cool future tech and it's vast supplies of Oricalcum, which in the game is depicted as concentrated energy storage superior to even uranium in potential("Think big, like the Americans! Think of Bombs!"). It generally holds together, at least as well as any indy story does and the game proceeds as a breezy pace across the world to the lost city.

The locations are interesting and varied, the graphics look good for a 25 year old game(hand drawn artwork doesn't age nearly as bad as the 3D graphics that came after), the voice acting is generally good(Doug Lee does a reasonably close Harrison Ford Impression) and the puzzles feel fairly intuitive. It's possible to die but only in a few locations and the game is good at signposting when you're entering a dangerous situation. It's far better then a lot of other adventure games which were fond of killing you if you so much as looked at the wrong thing *COUGHSierraCough*.

What really makes the game interesting is the Path system. Near the beginning of the game(after a roughly half hour long intro sequence), it's suggested you like to solve problems a certain way, through thinking, action or teamwork(based on how you solved an earlier puzzle) and given a choice how you want to play. Once that choice is made, you're locked onto that path(named Wits, Fists and Teamwork) for the remainder of that playthrough. The same half dozen or so locations are the same but are visited in different orders(and one doesn't even show up on one of the paths), puzzles are different and certain plot beats are different. All paths eventually converge at Atlantis where the puzzles are the same but the 3 paths encourages replayability. This is a good thing considering the game isn't terribly long(I did all 3 paths in about 6 hours, though I only did the intro and atlantis once since there's no difference). While I've played the game numerous times before, none of the puzzles seemed terribly difficult(I checked for hints all of once for a puzzle I couldn't remember how to solve) and upon release this was a $60 game. So either the game took significantly longer at the time or I'm just much better at this then I used to be(or I just remember 90% of the puzzle solutions).

Anyway, it's a classic that remains playable and fun 25 year later. Worth a go if you're into point and click adventures or are interested in why they were popular in the 1990's.

It's very fitting that I beat Bloodborne on Groundhog Day.

Finally beat Ebrietas and Logarius in one try after overleveling to BL 135. The chalice dungeons really spoiled me.
Then backed up a save into the cloud so I could get all three different endings. Beat Gehrman twice without dying and Moon Presence in three attempts. Now I'm on NG+ and all that's left on the road to Platinum is getting to the bottom of the last couple of chalice dungeons before fighting the Yharnam Queen. Starting on the Defiled Chalice Dungeon the game becomes kind of a pain, halving your life and presenting bosses that kill you in one hit and require borderline perfection to best.

The Watchdog is a pain and everybody talks up dungeon Amygdala so I don't feel particularly triumphant right now. Those inscrutable non-endings you get for beating the game dont' help much either.

Honestly I don't get people who talk up the Souls/Borne games for their "stories". What passes for story boils down to optional cryptic dialogue, item description boxes, blink-and-you'll-miss loading screens and a poorly curated wiki.

I'm just here for the atmosphere and the boss fights.

Johnny Novgorod:
It's very fitting that I beat Bloodborne on Groundhog Day.

Finally beat Ebrietas and Logarius in one try after overleveling to BL 135. The chalice dungeons really spoiled me.
Then backed up a save into the cloud so I could get all three different endings. Beat Gehrman twice without dying and Moon Presence in three attempts. Now I'm on NG+ and all that's left on the road to Platinum is getting to the bottom of the last couple of chalice dungeons before fighting the Yharnam Queen. Starting on the Defiled Chalice Dungeon the game becomes kind of a pain, halving your life and presenting bosses that kill you in one hit and require borderline perfection to best.

The Watchdog is a pain and everybody talks up dungeon Amygdala so I don't feel particularly triumphant right now. Those inscrutable non-endings you get for beating the game dont' help much either.

Honestly I don't get people who talk up the Souls/Borne games for their "stories". What passes for story boils down to optional cryptic dialogue, item description boxes, blink-and-you'll-miss loading screens and a poorly curated wiki.

I'm just here for the atmosphere and the boss fights.

I think to some people its a puzzle box. Follow the clues to lead to the answer. When everyone declared who Solaire was, I remember thinking - you're just fitting parts to a story you want to tell. It's why the sequels are never seen in the same regard. People can't fit the pieces into a lie quick enough before the community takes over and says it doesn't amount to much. Dark Souls 1 never had a great story. The good story was people's head cannon. And we all know what happens when head cannon collides with reality

It's Year of the Rat, so I kicked it off by playing (still am, long campaign and too much fun) as Ikit Claw.

Dalisclock:

Asita:

Dalisclock:

Good luck. The first game is really rough and is not easy to like. The plot is good but god there's a lot of other places the game needs work, most of all the combat system.

I'd personally recommend just skipping to Witcher 2 and watching a LP of the first game, but otherwise I'd recommend dumping a lot of skill points into IGNI(the fire spell). It works in almost all situations and by god you're gonna need the help.

Yeah, I remember you mentioning that in another thread, and my understanding has long been that the Witcher 1 is easily the weakest installment. On the other hand, it's also my understanding that the Witcher series has a carryover feature, and I'm a stickler for that kind of thing (see Mass Effect, Dragon Age, Golden Sun, the LoZ Oracle games (if you count those), etc).

That being said, this is a case where I felt it wise to have a finger to a guide so as to minimize the rockiness. So it's less that I'm having difficulty with the game than it is that the pacing feels atrocious due to the obligatory 'grind out a few levels before you complete the quests' segments. For instance, I think I was level 11 whenI finally made it to the Temple Quarter (starting Chapter 2), and was advised to start farming Graviers in the sewer crypts until I hit level 15. So that's a few hours of fighting 4 monsters, running back to the campfire, meditating for an hour to refresh their spawns and repeating, with occasional runs up to the Slums to earn a small amount of extra coin by boxing. Perils of being overcautious, perhaps. Still, the fact that grinding is recommended at all speaks to some of the game's mechanical issues.

I know I tend to bring it up a bit. It's not a bad game but I remember it feeling very clunky and some parts were downright infuriating to fight and survive through so I guess some of the negatives have stuck with me more then the parts I liked. I remember having a consistently much better time with the sequels and considering the first game gets almost forgotten after a while it feels like the most expendable of the lot.

As for the carryover save, I don't remember what you get out of it other then the 2nd game remembers some of your decisions(which don't matter once 3 rolls around) and you start with a slightly better sword in the sequel.

The original was my first real "modern" RPG on PC, so I have a soft spot for it all things considered. Going in with that, I was probably able to take the clunkiness in stride more than most, and kinda found a nice rhythm to the combat. The sign usage was slightly more cumbersome and of course Geralt's traversal mechanics felt like anything but an agile Witcher's, but I still loved the atmosphere, music, questing and PC-centric menu design, which was to me downgraded in the sequel. 3's is improved but also overly complex for what it does.

Aside from the dated engine and mechanics I enjoyed the original more than 2. The sequel felt too streamlined and more like an action adventure, with too much focus on cinematic presentation. I think both games had a couple tough large scale battle sequences near the end, but I don't recall having to grind for either. There was one boss fight in a cave involving the salamandra (I think) in TW1 that was kinda buggy where the game crashed a few times for me, but other than that the Enhanced Edition was pretty stable overall.

Johnny Novgorod:
It's very fitting that I beat Bloodborne on Groundhog Day.

Finally beat Ebrietas and Logarius in one try after overleveling to BL 135. The chalice dungeons really spoiled me.
Then backed up a save into the cloud so I could get all three different endings. Beat Gehrman twice without dying and Moon Presence in three attempts. Now I'm on NG+ and all that's left on the road to Platinum is getting to the bottom of the last couple of chalice dungeons before fighting the Yharnam Queen. Starting on the Defiled Chalice Dungeon the game becomes kind of a pain, halving your life and presenting bosses that kill you in one hit and require borderline perfection to best.

The Watchdog is a pain and everybody talks up dungeon Amygdala so I don't feel particularly triumphant right now. Those inscrutable non-endings you get for beating the game dont' help much either.

Honestly I don't get people who talk up the Souls/Borne games for their "stories". What passes for story boils down to optional cryptic dialogue, item description boxes, blink-and-you'll-miss loading screens and a poorly curated wiki.

I'm just here for the atmosphere and the boss fights.

There is a rune that gives you more health to help offset the cursed dungeon. Gonna continue with The Old Hunters afterwards? It's definitely got more of what you're looking for.

Recently replayed Ni No Kuni (Wrath of the White Witch), and finally got the Platinum. I'd tried to get that Plat the first time I played it three years ago so it's been a long time coming.

Also completed Monster Boy & the Cursed Kingdom, which was great fun. Nice to play an action-platformer that isn't grim as all hell for once.

Currently playing Bloodstained and The Witcher 3. Late to the party on both, I know.

hanselthecaretaker:

Johnny Novgorod:
It's very fitting that I beat Bloodborne on Groundhog Day.

Finally beat Ebrietas and Logarius in one try after overleveling to BL 135. The chalice dungeons really spoiled me.
Then backed up a save into the cloud so I could get all three different endings. Beat Gehrman twice without dying and Moon Presence in three attempts. Now I'm on NG+ and all that's left on the road to Platinum is getting to the bottom of the last couple of chalice dungeons before fighting the Yharnam Queen. Starting on the Defiled Chalice Dungeon the game becomes kind of a pain, halving your life and presenting bosses that kill you in one hit and require borderline perfection to best.

The Watchdog is a pain and everybody talks up dungeon Amygdala so I don't feel particularly triumphant right now. Those inscrutable non-endings you get for beating the game dont' help much either.

Honestly I don't get people who talk up the Souls/Borne games for their "stories". What passes for story boils down to optional cryptic dialogue, item description boxes, blink-and-you'll-miss loading screens and a poorly curated wiki.

I'm just here for the atmosphere and the boss fights.

There is a rune that gives you more health to help offset the cursed dungeon. Gonna continue with The Old Hunters afterwards? It?s definitely got more of what you?re looking for.

I don't have the DLC but I liked the game enough that I'll probably buy it when I'm ready to have a second go.
Do you mean the +5% rune? Does it really make much of a difference?

Johnny Novgorod:

hanselthecaretaker:

Johnny Novgorod:
It's very fitting that I beat Bloodborne on Groundhog Day.

Finally beat Ebrietas and Logarius in one try after overleveling to BL 135. The chalice dungeons really spoiled me.
Then backed up a save into the cloud so I could get all three different endings. Beat Gehrman twice without dying and Moon Presence in three attempts. Now I'm on NG+ and all that's left on the road to Platinum is getting to the bottom of the last couple of chalice dungeons before fighting the Yharnam Queen. Starting on the Defiled Chalice Dungeon the game becomes kind of a pain, halving your life and presenting bosses that kill you in one hit and require borderline perfection to best.

The Watchdog is a pain and everybody talks up dungeon Amygdala so I don't feel particularly triumphant right now. Those inscrutable non-endings you get for beating the game dont' help much either.

Honestly I don't get people who talk up the Souls/Borne games for their "stories". What passes for story boils down to optional cryptic dialogue, item description boxes, blink-and-you'll-miss loading screens and a poorly curated wiki.

I'm just here for the atmosphere and the boss fights.

There is a rune that gives you more health to help offset the cursed dungeon. Gonna continue with The Old Hunters afterwards? It?s definitely got more of what you?re looking for.

I don't have the DLC but I liked the game enough that I'll probably buy it when I'm ready to have a second go.
Do you mean the +5% rune? Does it really make much of a difference?

There's a 10% one in the Nightmare realm in the swampy area, across from the golem throwing rocks. It made enough of a difference for me to not *always* get one-shotted.

Johnny Novgorod:

Honestly I don't get people who talk up the Souls/Borne games for their "stories". What passes for story boils down to optional cryptic dialogue, item description boxes, blink-and-you'll-miss loading screens and a poorly curated wiki.

I'm just here for the atmosphere and the boss fights.

Soulsborne games have a lot of cool lore, but the stories are pretty bare bones. The upside and downside of the lore stuff is that you have to go hunting all over the place to find it, or go to youtube and watch the lore videos.

Johnny Novgorod:

hanselthecaretaker:

Johnny Novgorod:
It's very fitting that I beat Bloodborne on Groundhog Day.

Finally beat Ebrietas and Logarius in one try after overleveling to BL 135. The chalice dungeons really spoiled me.
Then backed up a save into the cloud so I could get all three different endings. Beat Gehrman twice without dying and Moon Presence in three attempts. Now I'm on NG+ and all that's left on the road to Platinum is getting to the bottom of the last couple of chalice dungeons before fighting the Yharnam Queen. Starting on the Defiled Chalice Dungeon the game becomes kind of a pain, halving your life and presenting bosses that kill you in one hit and require borderline perfection to best.

The Watchdog is a pain and everybody talks up dungeon Amygdala so I don't feel particularly triumphant right now. Those inscrutable non-endings you get for beating the game dont' help much either.

Honestly I don't get people who talk up the Souls/Borne games for their "stories". What passes for story boils down to optional cryptic dialogue, item description boxes, blink-and-you'll-miss loading screens and a poorly curated wiki.

I'm just here for the atmosphere and the boss fights.

There is a rune that gives you more health to help offset the cursed dungeon. Gonna continue with The Old Hunters afterwards? It?s definitely got more of what you?re looking for.

I don't have the DLC but I liked the game enough that I'll probably buy it when I'm ready to have a second go.
Do you mean the +5% rune? Does it really make much of a difference?

Also forgot to mention in case you didn't know about this site that's worth checking out for games in general.

Silvanus:
Recently replayed Ni No Kuni (Wrath of the White Witch), and finally got the Platinum. I'd tried to get that Plat the first time I played it three years ago so it's been a long time coming.

Currently playing Bloodstained and The Witcher 3. Late to the party on both, I know.

No shame in being late to the party. I almost never play games when they're new. Disco Elysium is like the only one I can think of off the top of my head that I've played anywhere near launch.

How is Ni No Kuni? I've heard mixed reviews(other then the artstyle, which looks great).

Final fantasy XV, probably the first of this series I felt any hint of investment towards, despite not quite understanding what's going on and only half-paying attention. Still waiting for my flying car though.

Dalisclock:

No shame in being late to the party. I almost never play games when they're new. Disco Elysium is like the only one I can think of off the top of my head that I've played anywhere near launch.

How is Ni No Kuni? I've heard mixed reviews(other then the artstyle, which looks great).

I love it. It's got a surprisingly deep progression/ combat system, a really well-realised world, and buckets of charm. Even the story takes one or two unexpected turns. Plus, it has Welsh fairies. The Fairygrounds, with dozens of little Fairies going around calling you mun and saying things are tidy is one of my favourite towns in any game.

If I had one criticism, it would be that it can be a bit twee at times, and the protagonist is painfully earnest.

Kingdom Hearts Dream Drop Distance HD.

bluegate:
Kingdom Hearts Dream Drop Distance HD.

Have you played The World Ends With You? Because KH:DDD spoils the former's big twist big time.

Dalisclock:

Silvanus:
Recently replayed Ni No Kuni (Wrath of the White Witch), and finally got the Platinum. I'd tried to get that Plat the first time I played it three years ago so it's been a long time coming.

Currently playing Bloodstained and The Witcher 3. Late to the party on both, I know.

No shame in being late to the party. I almost never play games when they're new. Disco Elysium is like the only one I can think of off the top of my head that I've played anywhere near launch.

How is Ni No Kuni? I've heard mixed reviews(other then the artstyle, which looks great).

It's cute and charming and sometimes surprisingly endearing and sad without getting sappy. Presentation goes a long way, especially with Ghibli behind the animation and character design, and Joe Hisaishi scoring the game with a full-fledged philharmonic. I have fond memories of the game. Not that it means much to anybody but it's actually developed by Level-5, whom I like a lot since Dragon's Quest VIII and which influences a lot of the look and feel of Ni no Kuni.

Having said that, Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch suffers a bit for actually being a port/remake of Ni no Kuni: Domain of the Dark Djinn, a DS game. "Witch" is the same story, now bookended by the White Witch of the title, and without spoiling things I'd argue her presence sort of ruins the more interesting interpretation of the story. Some of the things in Wrath of the Witch also feel like gimmicky remnants of a smaller portable game. The combat is a cumbersome turn-based/live-action hybrid that is easy to work around but isn't particularly intuitive. The puzzles are plain and boil down to busywork - the characters always spell it out for you anyway. So yeah, gorgeous game, good experience, but rough around the edges regarding combat and storytelling.

Johnny Novgorod:

Dalisclock:

Silvanus:
Recently replayed Ni No Kuni (Wrath of the White Witch), and finally got the Platinum. I'd tried to get that Plat the first time I played it three years ago so it's been a long time coming.

Currently playing Bloodstained and The Witcher 3. Late to the party on both, I know.

No shame in being late to the party. I almost never play games when they're new. Disco Elysium is like the only one I can think of off the top of my head that I've played anywhere near launch.

How is Ni No Kuni? I've heard mixed reviews(other then the artstyle, which looks great).

It's cute and charming and sometimes surprisingly endearing and sad without getting sappy. Presentation goes a long way, especially with Ghibli behind the animation and character design, and Joe Hisaishi scoring the game with a full-fledged philharmonic. I have fond memories of the game. Not that it means much to anybody but it's actually developed by Level-5, whom I like a lot since Dragon's Quest VIII and which influences a lot of the look and feel of Ni no Kuni.

Having said that, Ni no Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch suffers a bit for actually being a port/remake of Ni no Kuni: Domain of the Dark Djinn, a DS game. "Witch" is the same story, now bookended by the White Witch of the title, and without spoiling things I'd argue her presence sort of ruins the more interesting interpretation of the story. Some of the things in Wrath of the Witch also feel like gimmicky remnants of a smaller portable game. The combat is a cumbersome turn-based/live-action hybrid that is easy to work around but isn't particularly intuitive. The puzzles are plain and boil down to busywork - the characters always spell it out for you anyway. So yeah, gorgeous game, good experience, but rough around the edges regarding combat and storytelling.

I kinda knew that there were two versions of the game but I don't really know the difference between them. I am glad to hear it is more then just "That game that looks like a Studio Ghibli film" and I do appreciate something that's charming without being saccharine. I had a similar feeling about the game WanderSong(though I don't know if the two are similar).

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