What games are you playing?

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 . . . 54 NEXT
 

Kentucky Route Zero

This is kind of a weird game to talk about for a number of reasons. This game was kickstarted nearly a decade ago and the first episode dropped into 2013 with a second following up shortly afterward. Since then the interval between episodes has gotten longer and longer, rivaling GRR Martin for time to reach the finish line on a project. Episode four dropped in 2017 and only in the past week has the game reached it's conclusion, with barely a word in the meantime.

As for what is KRZ, it's hard to say because it's just hard to define in general. It seems like a point and click adventure game, except there aren't really any puzzles to speak of and it's generally a linear sequence with some exploration thrown in. To call it a game feels generous, to call it a walking simulator feels simplistic and restrictive and to call it interactive theater feels like something from the early 1990's.

KRZ is about a man named Conway driving a beat up delivery truck around backwoods Kentucky one summer night, looking for an address that doesn't seem to show up on any maps. He's told he needs to take a special road, the Zero, which runs underground through the massive cave system that runs under the area(based on the real Mammoth Cave in Kentucky). The journey takes place over the course of that summer night, back and forth along the roads as Conway meets a small entourage of lost souls who decide to accompany him for their own reasons.

If that doesn't sound like much of a plot, it really isn't. The games real appeal comes in its atmosphere, characters and the sense of exploration. You can(and should) drive aimlessly along the back roads and come across any number of weird and interesting people and encounters that have nothing to do with the main story or characters but are somehow strangely compelling to seek out. For example, at one point you meet two men, exhausted and barefoot, pushing a broken plane down a country road. You never find out why they're doing this and it's never mentioned anywhere else(though later you see the plane being floated down an underground river by the same two men), it just is.
Some parts clearly evoke appalachian folktales and ghost stories and there's a strong argument to be made that some of the locations you visit are haunted. That being said, the game isn't a horror game at all, though a deep sense of melancholy pervades the entire thing.

The people you meet along the journey are all normal people trying their hardest to get by in a struggling rural region in what's clearly an area hit hard by the great recession, where the closest thing to a villain to be found is the local power company that seems to have their claws into everything. Debt to the power company is pervasive amongst the people you meet and parallels between crippling debt and purgatory/death are made clear as the game goes on. Once you're in, there's little hope of coming back.

Kentucky Route Zero shines in it's presentation because of this. The people you see all feel grounded and real, even if you don't end up interacting with them directly, which strands in strange juxtaposition with the surrealism of the whole thing. The Zero and the region in general feel like something out of a David Lynch movie and perhaps might be the best adaptation of Lynch(with significant notes of Gabriel Garcia Marquez as well) ever put into a video game. It's even weirder in that much of it draws inspiration from theater, where conversations feel like you're choosing lines for the characters rather then interrogating or solving dialogue puzzles. Certain locations feel like sets(intentionally so) rather then video game locations and one of the mini-sodes "The Entertainment" now included with the game is essentially a play you're watching that ties in with the main story.

There are four mini-sodes, each released between the five acts and while none of them are required, they do tie in with the main game in interesting ways. The final mini-sode "un pueblo de nada" feels like a prelude to the final act while following up some of the weirder references in act four and if nothing else, is worth watching.

As for the long awaited final act, it feels like a thematic epilogue rather then a wrap up. The destination is reached and the nights journey is over as a new day dawns. People decide where to go from here. KRZ was always about the journey rather then the destination. That's not to say it's bad but it's different and kinda weird even for the standard already set by the episodes before it.

It's definitely not for everyone and no doubt some people will consider the whole thing pretentious but it's one of the most unique things I've seen in this medium and I'm glad to have experienced it. It does feel like a strange and wonderful, yet sad journey that has finally come to an end.

2 horses out of 1 mechanical mammoth.

Dalisclock:
Kentucky Route Zero

This is kind of a weird game to talk about for a number of reasons. This game was kickstarted nearly a decade ago and the first episode dropped into 2013 with a second following up shortly afterward. Since then the interval between episodes has gotten longer and longer, rivaling GRR Martin for time to reach the finish line on a project. Episode four dropped in 2017 and only in the past week has the game reached it's conclusion, with barely a word in the meantime.

As for what is KRZ, it's hard to say because it's just hard to define in general. It seems like a point and click adventure game, except there aren't really any puzzles to speak of and it's generally a linear sequence with some exploration thrown in. To call it a game feels generous, to call it a walking simulator feels simplistic and restrictive and to call it interactive theater feels like something from the early 1990's.

KRZ is about a man named Conway driving a beat up delivery truck around backwoods Kentucky one summer night, looking for an address that doesn't seem to show up on any maps. He's told he needs to take a special road, the Zero, which runs underground through the massive cave system that runs under the area(based on the real Mammoth Cave in Kentucky). The journey takes place over the course of that summer night, back and forth along the roads as Conway meets a small entourage of lost souls who decide to accompany him for their own reasons.

If that doesn't sound like much of a plot, it really isn't. The games real appeal comes in its atmosphere, characters and the sense of exploration. You can(and should) drive aimlessly along the back roads and come across any number of weird and interesting people and encounters that have nothing to do with the main story or characters but are somehow strangely compelling to seek out. For example, at one point you meet two men, exhausted and barefoot, pushing a broken plane down a country road. You never find out why they're doing this and it's never mentioned anywhere else(though later you see the plane being floated down an underground river by the same two men), it just is.
Some parts clearly evoke appalachian folktales and ghost stories and there's a strong argument to be made that some of the locations you visit are haunted. That being said, the game isn't a horror game at all, though a deep sense of melancholy pervades the entire thing.

The people you meet along the journey are all normal people trying their hardest to get by in a struggling rural region in what's clearly an area hit hard by the great recession, where the closest thing to a villain to be found is the local power company that seems to have their claws into everything. Debt to the power company is pervasive amongst the people you meet and parallels between crippling debt and purgatory/death are made clear as the game goes on. Once you're in, there's little hope of coming back.

Kentucky Route Zero shines in it's presentation because of this. The people you see all feel grounded and real, even if you don't end up interacting with them directly, which strands in strange juxtaposition with the surrealism of the whole thing. The Zero and the region in general feel like something out of a David Lynch movie and perhaps might be the best adaptation of Lynch(with significant notes of Gabriel Garcia Marquez as well) ever put into a video game. It's even weirder in that much of it draws inspiration from theater, where conversations feel like you're choosing lines for the characters rather then interrogating or solving dialogue puzzles. Certain locations feel like sets(intentionally so) rather then video game locations and one of the mini-sodes "The Entertainment" now included with the game is essentially a play you're watching that ties in with the main story.

There are four mini-sodes, each released between the five acts and while none of them are required, they do tie in with the main game in interesting ways. The final mini-sode "un pueblo de nada" feels like a prelude to the final act while following up some of the weirder references in act four and if nothing else, is worth watching.

As for the long awaited final act, it feels like a thematic epilogue rather then a wrap up. The destination is reached and the nights journey is over as a new day dawns. People decide where to go from here. KRZ was always about the journey rather then the destination. That's not to say it's bad but it's different and kinda weird even for the standard already set by the episodes before it.

It's definitely not for everyone and no doubt some people will consider the whole thing pretentious but it's one of the most unique things I've seen in this medium and I'm glad to have experienced it. It does feel like a strange and wonderful, yet sad journey that has finally come to an end.

2 horses out of 1 mechanical mammoth.

I'd raise it to 1.5 real mammoths out of 1 mechanical mammoth if there was moonshine involved.

CaitSeith:

bluegate:
Kingdom Hearts Dream Drop Distance HD.

Have you played The World Ends With You? Because KH:DDD spoils the former's big twist big time.

I haven't and probably never will at this point.

When the game first released I thought that it looked pretty cool, but years later when I finally got a DS I didn't care for it anymore.

Granblue Fantasy Versus just came out so I'm kinda swamped in my practice. Lancelot and Zeta are who I'm focusing on right now, Zeta wasn't in the beta (wao this rhymes lol) so I have to learn everything but Lance feels like putting on a comfortable pair of shoes and kicking some ass with them.

Great game, everyone who likes fighters or anime style games should at least give it a shot when the USA version comes out next month!

Dreiko:
Granblue Fantasy Versus just came out so I'm kinda swamped in my practice. Lancelot and Zeta are who I'm focusing on right now, Zeta wasn't in the beta (wao this rhymes lol) so I have to learn everything but Lance feels like putting on a comfortable pair of shoes and kicking some ass with them.

Great game, everyone who likes fighters or anime style games should at least give it a shot when the USA version comes out next month!

I am more of a fighting game spectator than a player these days, so a lot of my info comes secondhand. Is it true that Granblue is significantly watered down mechanically compared to other Arc System Works games?

Fappy:

Dreiko:
Granblue Fantasy Versus just came out so I'm kinda swamped in my practice. Lancelot and Zeta are who I'm focusing on right now, Zeta wasn't in the beta (wao this rhymes lol) so I have to learn everything but Lance feels like putting on a comfortable pair of shoes and kicking some ass with them.

Great game, everyone who likes fighters or anime style games should at least give it a shot when the USA version comes out next month!

I am more of a fighting game spectator than a player these days, so a lot of my info comes secondhand. Is it true that Granblue is significantly watered down mechanically compared to other Arc System Works games?

The game is not like BB or GG, it plays more like KoF, way more ground based and spacing based with less crazy mobility in the air and so on. It has an easy input button you can't turn off but that makes moves have significant cooldown if you use it so it's just terrible for normal use most of the time (though being able to do walk up 360s with a single input or charge specials without actually charging has its uses for some chars).

The way it plays is just different, combos are shorter etc. It has a smaller focus on resource management and fewer systems you need to comprehend fully to do well, at least with some chars. Meter is literally only there for supers, and your ex moves are doable anytime and just makes the respective move cool down for a longer period of time, so you literally can start a round and use all 4 ex moves in a row right away for example, something which normally would take a ton of meter in other games, and while the cooldown is longer than if you do the regular versions of these moves it's not that long so it's a viable approach. It has a ton of freedom but it's just different from other arcsys games. It also has the universal roll that KoF and persona arena had, as well as a stationary dodge, and both are universal, and while instant blocking is less powerful it's still in the game too, so you will have some familiar systems there. IB is mainly there to avoid chip cause it fully prevents it and in this game you can get crazy chip deaths. It also has a dust/all out attack-like button combination but you only get a full combo off of it on counterhit, which is not as hard to get as you'd think cause the dust is throw invincible so you can do it right as your foe tries to tech an implied grab attempt.

I think what they're going for with this game is something that the fans of the original granblue phone game can play at a basic level and the complexity comes with different characters, since someone like Gran or Katalina are just very simple, almost street fighter levels of simple, but then you have someone like Zeta or Metera with more familiar-feeling to GG and BB fans mechanics (metera throws out butterflies that do nothing until she shoots them and then they do amazing oki, and she can even hit them with her universal overhead, Ferry is another one who gets an install super that lets her do reverse beats like she's from UNIEL lol), also some of the dlc chars seem more complex too from what we've seen so far.

All in all, you wanna not come into the game expecting the next GG evolution, it's more like a new type of arcsys game, not inferior or dumbed down but just very different.

Oh and the visuals are gorgeous too, you don't have IKs now but if you kill someone in the final round with your big super that's only doable when you have low life there's a unique winpose that's basically a continuation of the super's cutscene, which is just super seamless and gorgeous and makes you happy to both win or lose (at least somewhat when losing XD). Lancelot's for example freezes the entire stage so you see his breath visibly due to the cold and it also kinda looks like a dragon's breath which fits with his lore as one of the dragon knights. It's all very smartly put together.

I've been playing The Outer Worlds this week. Turned out I couldn't quite bring myself to wait my usual arbitrarily long time before buying it, and frankly it's the space-Fallout that I've been wanting for ages. The writing is excellent, the combat is decent, and I can very much get behind the whole anti-corporation stuff. I especially love this deeply cynical world that Obsidian have built, it's mesmerising.

RDR2 Online has held my interest for about 162 hrs and counting. It's been very pleasant and fun overall; currently going for the 2nd Outlaw Pass, but the most annoying part is the camp spawning in the Trader role. Cripps packs up camp and then it can be tough getting it set up again due to server issues. Idk why they can't just put your session in a lobby that doesn't have the location you want currently in use, which seems to be the reason behind the ongoing spawning issue.

In a latest example of sony censorship, Granblue Fantasy Versus added the original uncensored costumes for Zeta and Metera as rewards for beating RPG mode (rpg mode is amazing btw, plays kinda like a beat em up of old) and the changes are so minor it makes you wonder why they didn't let these costumes be the default since they're actually true to the original art.

Ah well, better than not having them at all I guess lol.

Dusk

No shocker here, I goddamn love this title. With the sole exceptions of some annoying "where's the door" hunts, this is exactly how you do a retro shooter; old school sensibilities and style with new school polish and just enough curveballs to keep you from getting complacent. Definitely going to be on my all time list. Wonder what B-Cell thought of it?

Playing more DMC5. Finally getting the hang of juggling Dante's Sin Devil Trigger mechanic. There is a move you can buy where if you're at SSS rank you can switch in to SDT while doing combos for brief periods without wasting the whole meter. I re-did mission 17 and managed to beat Urizen without dying and I got stylish points over 9000. I could not get the no damage bonus, but there is always next time. After that, I spent a half hour in training mode trying out new combos for Dante.

After seeing the RPG mode for Grandblue VS. I am now per-ordering this. I'll play it for the brawler mode alone. For those interested:

After the success of FighterZ, Arc System Works has been getting constant work. Good on you guys and gals!

CoCage:
Playing more DMC5. Finally getting the hang of juggling Dante's Sin Devil Trigger mechanic. There is a move you can buy where if you're at SSS rank you can switch in to SDT while doing combos for brief periods without wasting the whole meter. I re-did mission 17 and managed to beat Urizen without dying and I got stylish points over 9000. I could not get the no damage bonus, but there is always next time. After that, I spent a half hour in training mode trying out new combos for Dante.

After seeing the RPG mode for Grandblue VS. I am now per-ordering this. I'll play it for the brawler mode alone. For those interested:

After the success of FighterZ, Arc System Works has been getting constant work. Good on you guys and gals!

The best part about RPG mode is that you actually get new gear which they actually went through the trouble of shading so you can have various kinds of weapons and shields and so on for all the chars and they all look really nice.

Btw, we just discovered a proximity OS which lets you use the guard button and cancel pre-block frames into specials/supers which is busted and will get patched before the USA version comes out for sure. So you already have something to look forward to that will be better than the JP version. (to the less versed in terminology, an OS is a method of inputing various things simultaneously and if your foe does something then one thing will happen while if your foe doesn't do something another thing will happen and this one is extremely powerful because the thing that happens if your foe doesn't do anything is mere crouch blocking, which is extremely safe for an OS)

https://twitter.com/SuperKawaiiDesu/status/1226247193968959489

https://twitter.com/Al_Rikir/status/1226256188079165440

Just look at this silliness lol.

Metro Exodus

I love the first two. I only got to the first open world area. This doesn't make sense to me. I can only walk incredibly slowly even at a run, there doesn't seem to be a fast travel. Should I put up with all this friction? Is it actually worth it. Because I'm already frustrated and disappointed. It's making it really unfun

trunkage:
Metro Exodus

I love the first two. I only got to the first open world area. This doesn't make sense to me. I can only walk incredibly slowly even at a run, there doesn't seem to be a fast travel. Should I put up with all this friction? Is it actually worth it. Because I'm already frustrated and disappointed. It's making it really unfun

I didn't really get along with Metro: Exodus all too well, but then again, I really don't like open world games, or open world-lite games.

To me, Exodus was a fantastic game when it was doing what Metro does best, which is putting you in dark, linear environments, using limited resources to survive. Unfortunately with Exodus, that happens far too little. A lot of the time, you are just wondering around a large desolate environment, with the occaisional tunnel to explore, before you get to your next objective.

Ultimately, would I play Exodus again? Probably not - unless I can skip the open-world sections.

These are the games that I have completed this year:

Totally Accurate Battle Simulator
It was goofy fun, and some of the challenges were quite intereting, but after a while the luster kind of wore off, and if you were really struggling, you could just use one of the OP units like the Grim Reaper, and effectively cheese your way to victory.

What Remains of Edith Finch
This was touted as one of the best games of 2018, and whilst I found enjoyment in a few of the characters and their stories, I did find it to be one of those artsy fartsy games that ended up being more style than substance.

Batman Arkham Knight: Arkham Episodes
These DLC "Episodes" were short and sweet little bits of content, tying up some loose ends after the end of the main game. Whilst there was relatively little going on, they were enjoyable enough (especially playing as Red Hood).

Call of Duty Black Ops 2
There was a surprisingly a lot going on with this game, especially for a Call of Duty campaign. Multiple choices, multiple endings, a whole boatload of variety. Really enjoyable. Even if I did find the story to be quite convoluted.

Devil May Cry 5
The combat was obviously the star of the show, especially with Dante and V, but I really cannot remember much about the story - though having not played a DMC game in the past, I didn't go into it with high expectations. It was fine, but I remember being ready for the game to end about half-way through.

F.E.A.R
I did NOT get along with this game. The combat was fine, but because it was basically you vs the same one enemy type over and over and over again, and the weapon variety was pretty lackluster, I got tired of it quick. The boring environments of an office, grey contcrete or vents didn't help either. I honestly dont think I could tell one level from another.

Her Story
I've never played a game like this before, and I honestly LOVED it.

I really enjoyed how the game would just let you finish the game whenever you felt satisfied with what was going on, and how you could stumble upon really crucial plot details really early, or really late, depending on what you found and picked up on. Really, really enjoyable.

Pyre
The gameplay was a bit one-note, and I found it a bit too easy on the difficulty that I played it on, but I really enjoyed the constant tug-of-war that was your choice between releasing a character that you liked on a personality-level, and not wanting to release someone who really suited your playstyle. The music was great, too.

Mario Kart 8
Its Mario Kart. It was fine.

Laggyteabag:
These are the games that I have completed this year:

Devil May Cry 5
The combat was obviously the star of the show, especially with Dante and V, but I really cannot remember much about the story - though having not played a DMC game in the past, I didn't go into it with high expectations. It was fine, but I remember being ready for the game to end about half-way through.

F.E.A.R
I did NOT get along with this game. The combat was fine, but because it was basically you vs the same one enemy type over and over and over again, and the weapon variety was pretty lackluster, I got tired of it quick. The boring environments of an office, grey contcrete or vents didn't help either. I honestly dont think I could tell one level from another.

Nero is the star too. And both him and Dante's combat options open even further after beating the main campaign. I won't spoil it for you. The story is great, but the problem is that you have not played the other games. At least play 1, 3 (this and 5 have the best stories in the series), & 4, so you will get a better understanding of the characters, lore, and references. The game has some pacing issues, but that's only missions 8, 12 , & 18. At least mission 18 has plenty of cool callbacks to DMC1. V is awesome, but you will notice his combat options are limited by comparison. Still a fun character.

F.E.A.R I somewhat agree on the level design, but the weapon variety works. Not the most, but all of the weapons are useful and play their parts. The Replicas are till this day, the smartest enemy AI in any fps. Almost no other game has matched the original FEAR not its expansion Extraction Point. The AI does not play the same in each encounter and always does something different. Try reloading checkpoints or save states on the PC version and see what I'm talking about. EP has a bit more variety in its environments as far as the original games go, but not by much. FEAR 2 has more environment variety, but worse gameplay by comparison, and F3AR is a fucking train wreck. F3AR is literally let's be like COD with a two weapon limit, unbalanced co-op, and a shitty ending to a trilogy. 3 has many problems of 7th gen gaming in 2011-2013. If you though the weapons are limited in the original FEAR, it's got nothing on 2 & especially 3.

Gravity Rush Remastered

It's like a Ghibli movie crossed with a mediocre anime starring a young, earnest protagonist with amnesia and balance issues.
The presentation and soudntrack are charming enough. Story is all over the place - every 'mission' feels like a sidequest and there's no real focus on the main story, which is filled with token mysteries that go nowhere. The main selling point is the central mechanic of the game, which lets you manipulate the gravity around Kat. One button to put her in stasis, another to send her hurtling in whatever direction you're aiming. It's simple, intuitive and a lot of fun. It both looks cool and feels cool, and it's particularly satisfying that this one mechanic is used for everything in the game: fighting, getting around, exploring, racing, puzzle-solving... it's like the axe in God of War 4.

Laggyteabag:

Call of Duty Black Ops 2
There was a surprisingly a lot going on with this game, especially for a Call of Duty campaign. Multiple choices, multiple endings, a whole boatload of variety. Really enjoyable. Even if I did find the story to be quite convoluted.

BLOPS2 was the last time I felt the series really tried to be interesting. My biggest complaint with the game was the RTS missions which couldn't be played as a pure RTS but were required for the best ending. I get why they're there(Everyone liked the SR-71 mission in BLOPS1) but it felt like it was a great ide with lackluster execution.

Laggyteabag:

F.E.A.R
I did NOT get along with this game. The combat was fine, but because it was basically you vs the same one enemy type over and over and over again, and the weapon variety was pretty lackluster, I got tired of it quick. The boring environments of an office, grey contcrete or vents didn't help either. I honestly dont think I could tell one level from another.

I played FEAR and one of the expansion packs back in like 2007 or something like that. I found it ok. Knowing that ALMA pretty much couldn't hurt you for much of the game made the horror sequences far less scary and shooting the clones/replicas felt very...meh. I don't remember much beyond that, really.

Laggyteabag:

Her Story
I've never played a game like this before, and I honestly LOVED it.

I really enjoyed how the game would just let you finish the game whenever you felt satisfied with what was going on, and how you could stumble upon really crucial plot details really early, or really late, depending on what you found and picked up on. Really, really enjoyable.

I've heard a lot of good things about Her Story and to a lesser extent, the sequel(?), Telling Lies. I plan to play it at some point, I just need to find a good time to do so.

Laggyteabag:

Pyre
The gameplay was a bit one-note, and I found it a bit too easy on the difficulty that I played it on, but I really enjoyed the constant tug-of-war that was your choice between releasing a character that you liked on a personality-level, and not wanting to release someone who really suited your playstyle. The music was great, too.

I just started playing this week and I haven't gotten very far in so I don't have much to say about it right now. I've put off playing it because it's basically a sports game and I'm not really into sports games. OTOH, I loved Bastian and Transistor so I figure I owe it to myself to try it out. I'm still trying to get a grasp on the best way to play the rites. I guess it's kinda like basketball but I feel like I'm fumbling around right now.

Laggyteabag:

trunkage:
Metro Exodus

I love the first two. I only got to the first open world area. This doesn't make sense to me. I can only walk incredibly slowly even at a run, there doesn't seem to be a fast travel. Should I put up with all this friction? Is it actually worth it. Because I'm already frustrated and disappointed. It's making it really unfun

I didn't really get along with Metro: Exodus all too well, but then again, I really don't like open world games, or open world-lite games.

To me, Exodus was a fantastic game when it was doing what Metro does best, which is putting you in dark, linear environments, using limited resources to survive. Unfortunately with Exodus, that happens far too little. A lot of the time, you are just wondering around a large desolate environment, with the occaisional tunnel to explore, before you get to your next objective.

Ultimately, would I play Exodus again? Probably not - unless I can skip the open-world sections.

Did the second misson in Volga. All weapons completely dirty and uselss and only a couple of bullets left. There is just too much friction in this game to make it fun. It's the first game ever I've considered putting down a difficulty.

I went back to Borderlands 3, and bought the DLC Mad Moxxi's Heist of the Handsome Jackpot. I'm almost done with it now and my impressions, kind of like BL 3 itself... its fine. It isn't going to be a make or break thing, if you want more content its fine. If you skip it... you aren't missing anything huge. Its fine. Its nice to see Hyperion stuff to shoot again rather than just mostly COV mooks and the occasional Maliwan troops. BL 3 desperately needed more varied enemy types and this DLC does that if nothing else. Its difficulty needs tweaking. In the first area I was 30 levels over standard enemies, then I entered the second area and was underleveled... but a mostly well balanced underleveled (tough but I'm getting great exp.) The weirdest thing was the loot. I immediately was getting fairly common shields drops that were significantly better than anything I was getting in the normal game, but weapons were about the same as I had been getting. And I was encountering random common (and normally leveled) mobs that for whatever reason were using weapons that could push me into FFYL after 2 or 3 hits. And when you are swarmed or surrounded trying to find that one mob, that looks the same as every other mob, that has the gun that wiped out my shields with 1 hit... that can be frustrating. But then again; live by the Jacobs, die by the Jacobs I guess.

The story. Its not one of the great ones like Dragon Keep. So far anyway. It brings back a character I'd been wondering about, and it does close the book on the pre-sequel playable characters... but the pre-sequel is pretty skippable in its own right. Its just Borderlands parodying caper movies mostly with a casino vibe and some Handsome Jack stuff thrown in.

Dalisclock:

Laggyteabag:

Pyre
The gameplay was a bit one-note, and I found it a bit too easy on the difficulty that I played it on, but I really enjoyed the constant tug-of-war that was your choice between releasing a character that you liked on a personality-level, and not wanting to release someone who really suited your playstyle. The music was great, too.

I just started playing this week and I haven't gotten very far in so I don't have much to say about it right now. I've put off playing it because it's basically a sports game and I'm not really into sports games. OTOH, I loved Bastian and Transistor so I figure I owe it to myself to try it out. I'm still trying to get a grasp on the best way to play the rites. I guess it's kinda like basketball but I feel like I'm fumbling around right now.

I found small/speed seemed like the most useful trait for the matches, so I went with one speedy for main offence, one biggie for defense, and whoever else to make up the slack for when speedy inevitability gets taken out for a bit. Also depends on how badly you want to liberate certain characters of course, but for me it was generally more doable as long as one Speeds McGee character had an offensive role; you can also squeeze a lot of cheeky shots through tiny gaps too! Seemed to me the most effective method of winning, but may not be the same for you. (Though the game does force you to experiment if you wanna be equal in leveling your chums up)

-

Cities: Skylines, first time city sim player here, very impressed by how user friendly it all is. Apart from the odd niggle I had to look up, it's been incredibly helpful in how it displays information and runs smoother than I'd expected. Music is limited, but hadn't expected any radio at all, so not much of an issue. Now, what DLC does one need to make this complete?

...

Ohh, best not think about that yet.

trunkage:
Metro Exodus

I love the first two. I only got to the first open world area. This doesn't make sense to me. I can only walk incredibly slowly even at a run, there doesn't seem to be a fast travel. Should I put up with all this friction? Is it actually worth it. Because I'm already frustrated and disappointed. It's making it really unfun

I loved the first map, Volga. The other 2 maps kinda reminded me of Far Cry without the busywork. The game does still narrow down during some story moments though and it still shows Metro is at it's most fun in tight corridors with scripted setpieces. Still even with the open world maps I applaud the game for having absolutely zero filler. It never overstays it's welcome.

Anyways currently playing Yakuza Kiwami 2 after having completed Yakuza 0, Yakuza Kiwami 1 and Judgment. Totally in love with this series. Every game out on PS4 now feels like a second chance after having missed it first time around.

Sayonara Wild Hearts

My kid was sick last week so I didn't get a lot of game time in, so I tried something I could get through quickly. I'd heard good things about this game and decided to give it a shot. I guess you could call it a rhythm game and it does feel like it at times but with elements of runners and arcade games as well.

It's super neon colored and while there seems to be a plot of sorts it doesn't seem to matter much. I guess it's also about Lesbians riding motorcycles and, sure, why not? Instead it comes across as sort of an interactive series of music videos with a tarot theming going on. It's entertaining and a bit of fun though if there's more to it once you get through to the end(which takes like an hour or so) I'm not aware of it. So yeah, a nice distraction with some cool visuals/music and it's nice how it changes thing up quite a bit to keep things from getting boring.

4 Arcana/7 motorcycles.

Other then that, still plugging away at Sekiro. Pretty much done with midgame, best I can tell, having explored as far as possible and Beaten the Corrupted Monk/Folding Screen Monkeys/Guardian Ape. I disliked the Monk due to her incredible reach considering the size of the area, but then I went up against the guardian ape and whoa boy, I really hate that fucking monkey/ape/simian and I'm starting to miss the Monk. THe fact the ape is super hard to read in his first phase, like a very angry toddler with some wrestling moves throwing a tantrum and then he switches to an entirely different moveset in the 2nd phase makes him a massive pain(especially before I found out how to bait his overhead swing).

I cut the fuckers head off more times then I want to admit before finally getting him down, then realize there's a 2nd fight as well. This one is annoying for different reasons. The fact he starts off using the headless phase this time around isn't so bad because now I was well versed in how to take him down, it's when he gets to his 2nd lifebar when, lo and behold, that fucking monkey calls for backup. While the 2nd ape is easier to kill then any of his phases, the big problem is that now it's a 2 on 1 fight and while the headless ape is still using the same moves as before, his buddy is using a modified version of this original moveset from the first fight. So I have to not only track two giant apes at the same time and take them out one at a time, but also keep track of two entirely different movesets in an arena smaller then the first one. Seriously? Needless to say, I was quite happy when the fucker was dead for good, not only for the reward(another memory and 2 prayer beads for the 2nd fight).

While I'm enjoying the game, I'm noticing it's starting to suffer from one of my least favorite gameplay tropes(and one Dark Souls 2 really annoyed me with), and that's the reskinned/repeat boss fight. Sekiro, like DS2, has a lot of bosses, but it feels like a disturbing number of them are basically the same boss copypasted around the map.

There's like half a dozen headless in the game, by my count, you fight the same Samurai general mini-boss like 3 times and Drunkard is basically the Glutton except with some monkeys and the easy opportunity for the deathblow from above. It feels lazy, despite the idea that vitality upgrades are tied to prayer beads which are almost always dropped by mini-bosses(you can find/buy a few as well by exploring everywhere), but in the case of the Guardian Ape, the 2nd version is basically a remix of the first, where the 2nd phase of the headless fight is basically fighting both phases of the Guardian fight at the same time. It's enough to knock it below bloodborne on my list of FROM games(though I'm still undecided how it stacks up against DS1).

Anyway, on to the top of the Castle again for another tough battle, this time against

Mostly inching towards completing the 2nd Outlaw pass in RDR2 Online, but mixed it up a bit with some Dark Souls 3 the last couple nights. First fell Yhorm the Giant in a cool gimmick nod to a legendary Demon's Souls weapon (and in a way, the Old Hero boss). Even considering that he took more tries than the Dancer afterward. Was surprised the Dancer went down as easily as she did after hearing how unpredictable her attacks are. Basically not getting too greedy and keeping distance or staying behind her slashy combo are all that's required. Now I'm finally in Lothric Castle.

Playing through Yakuza 5 now that it finally has a physical western release.

I'm still quite early on (just beat up Yahata, the tracksuit guy) but I'm having a blast as usual. The world feels much more alive in this game (and it was already done quite well in the previous ones), and I like some of the other small changes they've made (like sidequests popping up on the map).

Dalisclock:

Other then that, still plugging away at Sekiro. Pretty much done with midgame, best I can tell, having explored as far as possible and Beaten the Corrupted Monk/Folding Screen Monkeys/Guardian Ape. I disliked the Monk due to her incredible reach considering the size of the area, but then I went up against the guardian ape and whoa boy, I really hate that fucking monkey/ape/simian and I'm starting to miss the Monk. THe fact the ape is super hard to read in his first phase, like a very angry toddler with some wrestling moves throwing a tantrum and then he switches to an entirely different moveset in the 2nd phase makes him a massive pain(especially before I found out how to bait his overhead swing).

I cut the fuckers head off more times then I want to admit before finally getting him down, then realize there's a 2nd fight as well. This one is annoying for different reasons. The fact he starts off using the headless phase this time around isn't so bad because now I was well versed in how to take him down, it's when he gets to his 2nd lifebar when, lo and behold, that fucking monkey calls for backup. While the 2nd ape is easier to kill then any of his phases, the big problem is that now it's a 2 on 1 fight and while the headless ape is still using the same moves as before, his buddy is using a modified version of this original moveset from the first fight. So I have to not only track two giant apes at the same time and take them out one at a time, but also keep track of two entirely different movesets in an arena smaller then the first one. Seriously? Needless to say, I was quite happy when the fucker was dead for good, not only for the reward(another memory and 2 prayer beads for the 2nd fight).

While I'm enjoying the game, I'm noticing it's starting to suffer from one of my least favorite gameplay tropes(and one Dark Souls 2 really annoyed me with), and that's the reskinned/repeat boss fight. Sekiro, like DS2, has a lot of bosses, but it feels like a disturbing number of them are basically the same boss copypasted around the map.

There's like half a dozen headless in the game, by my count, you fight the same Samurai general mini-boss like 3 times and Drunkard is basically the Glutton except with some monkeys and the easy opportunity for the deathblow from above. It feels lazy, despite the idea that vitality upgrades are tied to prayer beads which are almost always dropped by mini-bosses(you can find/buy a few as well by exploring everywhere), but in the case of the Guardian Ape, the 2nd version is basically a remix of the first, where the 2nd phase of the headless fight is basically fighting both phases of the Guardian fight at the same time. It's enough to knock it below bloodborne on my list of FROM games(though I'm still undecided how it stacks up against DS1).

Anyway, on to the top of the Castle again for another tough battle, this time against

Was that after using the firecracker attachment?

hanselthecaretaker:

Dalisclock:

Other then that, still plugging away at Sekiro. Pretty much done with midgame, best I can tell, having explored as far as possible and Beaten the Corrupted Monk/Folding Screen Monkeys/Guardian Ape. I disliked the Monk due to her incredible reach considering the size of the area, but then I went up against the guardian ape and whoa boy, I really hate that fucking monkey/ape/simian and I'm starting to miss the Monk. THe fact the ape is super hard to read in his first phase, like a very angry toddler with some wrestling moves throwing a tantrum and then he switches to an entirely different moveset in the 2nd phase makes him a massive pain(especially before I found out how to bait his overhead swing).

I cut the fuckers head off more times then I want to admit before finally getting him down, then realize there's a 2nd fight as well. This one is annoying for different reasons. The fact he starts off using the headless phase this time around isn't so bad because now I was well versed in how to take him down, it's when he gets to his 2nd lifebar when, lo and behold, that fucking monkey calls for backup. While the 2nd ape is easier to kill then any of his phases, the big problem is that now it's a 2 on 1 fight and while the headless ape is still using the same moves as before, his buddy is using a modified version of this original moveset from the first fight. So I have to not only track two giant apes at the same time and take them out one at a time, but also keep track of two entirely different movesets in an arena smaller then the first one. Seriously? Needless to say, I was quite happy when the fucker was dead for good, not only for the reward(another memory and 2 prayer beads for the 2nd fight).

While I'm enjoying the game, I'm noticing it's starting to suffer from one of my least favorite gameplay tropes(and one Dark Souls 2 really annoyed me with), and that's the reskinned/repeat boss fight. Sekiro, like DS2, has a lot of bosses, but it feels like a disturbing number of them are basically the same boss copypasted around the map.

There's like half a dozen headless in the game, by my count, you fight the same Samurai general mini-boss like 3 times and Drunkard is basically the Glutton except with some monkeys and the easy opportunity for the deathblow from above. It feels lazy, despite the idea that vitality upgrades are tied to prayer beads which are almost always dropped by mini-bosses(you can find/buy a few as well by exploring everywhere), but in the case of the Guardian Ape, the 2nd version is basically a remix of the first, where the 2nd phase of the headless fight is basically fighting both phases of the Guardian fight at the same time. It's enough to knock it below bloodborne on my list of FROM games(though I'm still undecided how it stacks up against DS1).

Anyway, on to the top of the Castle again for another tough battle, this time against

Was that after using the firecracker attachment?

I ended up taking the non-headless apes down with the fire vent. I didn't find the firecracker gave me enough of window to do enough damage.

Oh, the Monk. Yeah, I used the firecracker to help knock her health down.

The Witness.

Just chilling wandering around an island, solving puzzles. It's a nice change of pace after having finished Blasphemous. Not quite sure whether it's a game that makes you feel really smart, or really stupid.

Johnny Novgorod:
Gravity Rush Remastered

It's like a Ghibli movie crossed with a mediocre anime starring a young, earnest protagonist with amnesia and balance issues.
The presentation and soudntrack are charming enough. Story is all over the place - every 'mission' feels like a sidequest and there's no real focus on the main story, which is filled with token mysteries that go nowhere. The main selling point is the central mechanic of the game, which lets you manipulate the gravity around Kat. One button to put her in stasis, another to send her hurtling in whatever direction you're aiming. It's simple, intuitive and a lot of fun. It both looks cool and feels cool, and it's particularly satisfying that this one mechanic is used for everything in the game: fighting, getting around, exploring, racing, puzzle-solving... it's like the axe in God of War 4.

I'd advise you to stay away from the sequel though, it only embeds the errors of the first game, as well as adding new ones. Remember how the first game starts you off very quickly, and within 10 minutes you're freely flying around the city? The sequel starts by having you walk very slowly for it first 5 minutes, then locks you to the ground for the following 15 to 20 minutes, and caps the tutorial off with a terrible boss fight. It's like the Kingdom Hearts 2 tutorial, but with its hands and feet cut off. And the rest of the game ain't much better.

OT: I played God of War '18 again, but finally beat Give Me God of War. I haven't formally beat it, but I defeated Sigrun so yeah, the rest is going to be easy breezy. I heard horror stories about how the game can be pretty broken on that difficulty, but overall I can't say I noticed it. It's still pretty fucking hard though, especially early on. I played it the same way I play on Challenging, meaning only using and upgrading the armor (for Kratos) that I find in-world (so no crafting armor), except for when I get to Niflheim. I also always do the first side-quest Brok gives you before I reach Sindri (the second axe upgrade), and on GoW difficulty one particular section in that side-quest is just stupid fucking hard if you don't have some better stats. I had to exploit every little thing I could to get past it, and it still took me over an hour.

Final Fantasy 7. Playing through the original game to familiarize myself with the plot and the characters before the remake comes out, because I'm going to play the Japanese version of that and it'll help with stuff I don't quite understand. Currently just recruited Cid (named Shiba on this file).

leet_x1337:
Final Fantasy 7. Playing through the original game to familiarize myself with the plot and the characters

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq6K1rIR8MQ

Saved you time. :P

Hawki:

leet_x1337:
Final Fantasy 7. Playing through the original game to familiarize myself with the plot and the characters

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq6K1rIR8MQ

Saved you time. :P

Forgot to mention I've also owned it for years and never even finished the first disc, so there's that too.

I've finished the Borderlands 3 1st DLC Mad Moxxi's Heist of the Handsome Jackpot... and my opinion of it really hasn't changed. Its fine. Ok. Not a must have but good enough if you want more content. The final boss fight. Middling challenge, not particularly difficult. And a pretty weak, limp, and flaccid "lootsplosion," nothing you need in any given play through. And to go along with that, the penultimate boss fight of the DLC is WAY harder than that final boss. The final boss I beat first try while never getting pushed into ffyl. Meanwhile the prior boss has huge area of affect weapons that immediately drops any shield you have with the initial hit and you can only stand on for a few seconds until you go into ffyl... and it constantly spawns mobs... and it fires in multiple random elements. I only won by going back to Sanctuary and grabbing a Transformer shield (make sure to do the Its Alive sidequest before tackling this boss) and then standing invincibly in one of its shock element aoe's and unloading on it. Its a sub-boss so tough I had to cheese it with a specific shield to defeat. And its "lootsplosion" isn't particularly robust either.

So final thought... meh, fun enough if you want to shoot a robot or 2 though. And one of the sub-bosses is a big claptrap... that spawns little claptraps. I do love shooting claptraps.

Bayonetta & Vanquish on PS4. Bayonetta is still awesome as always, instant-qte deaths aside, and Vanquish is still the best 3rd person cover shooter from last generation. Better than all of the Gears games. Bayonetta I will worry about completing later as I already beaten the game on 3 different systems. Vanquish I am gonna complete first as that is a game I only completed once and never touched the harder difficulties. Plus, I died a lot in that game. About 38 times. So far, I've only had one death, and that was in the middle of the first act, because I forgot about a one-hit kill move one of the stupid larger robot's can do. What is with you Shinji Mikami and one kill moves you won't see coming on a first time through or forgotten about if not played in a long time. I completed the first act within an hour, and did some of act 2. I am better player now, than I was when the game first launched in 2010. I barely use cover and know how to slide across the battlefield. Vanquish definitely left an influence on the shooter market in terms of movement. Look games like Crysis 2, Bulletstorm, and the newer Wolfenstein games. After Vanquish, all of these games had a slide mechanic where you could do it for long gaps, though not as long as the originator.

Casual Shinji:

Johnny Novgorod:
Gravity Rush Remastered

It's like a Ghibli movie crossed with a mediocre anime starring a young, earnest protagonist with amnesia and balance issues.
The presentation and soudntrack are charming enough. Story is all over the place - every 'mission' feels like a sidequest and there's no real focus on the main story, which is filled with token mysteries that go nowhere. The main selling point is the central mechanic of the game, which lets you manipulate the gravity around Kat. One button to put her in stasis, another to send her hurtling in whatever direction you're aiming. It's simple, intuitive and a lot of fun. It both looks cool and feels cool, and it's particularly satisfying that this one mechanic is used for everything in the game: fighting, getting around, exploring, racing, puzzle-solving... it's like the axe in God of War 4.

I'd advise you to stay away from the sequel though, it only embeds the errors of the first game, as well as adding new ones. Remember how the first game starts you off very quickly, and within 10 minutes you're freely flying around the city? The sequel starts by having you walk very slowly for it first 5 minutes, then locks you to the ground for the following 15 to 20 minutes, and caps the tutorial off with a terrible boss fight. It's like the Kingdom Hearts 2 tutorial, but with its hands and feet cut off. And the rest of the game ain't much better.

Whoops, I bought it last Friday. Finished the first game, went to buy to buy the sequel that very same day.

I was thinking of Kingdom Hearts 2 all throughout Gravity Rush 2's prologue. The comparison is 100% accurate, although I think KH2 had it worse because that went on for 3-5 hours and I didn't understand the context or care for any of the characters. At least I'm playing Kat, and I know her and Syd, and the context is established about as abruptly as the first game ended (I know there's an anime somewhere in between that I couldn't bother to track down and essentially pulls a Chain of Memories).

Right now I'm milling about Jirga Para Lhao and enjoying the game just from flying around the city knocking off fast travel points I won't use and collecting gems that I'm not sure if they respawn? Feels like I've picked the same bunch a few times. Anyway, I'm liking it enough, story has a bit more focus, rolling is finally useful, they've ironed out the stasis through mechanic and in general the game has a bigger more expansive feel to the locations. Other than the prologue the only thing I don't like at all is anything involving stealth, which was already in the first game. My take so far is that Gravity Rush 2 amplifies everything I liked about the first game while also keeping aroudn the kinks I didn't like.

 Pages PREV 1 . . . 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 . . . 54 NEXT

Reply to Thread

Posting on this forum is disabled.