Bad parts in great games.

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Kreett:

Saelune:

Seth Carter:

I mean, Lost Izalith was the part the developers themselves apologized for.

Souplex:
Culminating in the fucking Bed of Chaos, which is easily the worst part of the worst part of the game.

Lost Izalith is just lame. And the Bed of Chaos is the easiest boss in the game, considering it doesn't reset on death. Run to the left, break some one hit branches, repeat on right, repeat on center, kill bug with one hit.

It gets trivial when you realize that you can just exit to menu once you've destroyed the seal on one of the sides and you'll start outside the fogwall when you load back up

I had the proverbial rectal horseshoe and just happened to one and done the Bed of Chaos. Ornstein and Smough were a nuisance, but a well designed one.

Lost Izalith was literally an unfinished placeholder map with reused enemies and no design or thought behind any part of it other then the Bed of Chaos, by the developers own admission.

Most of the second half of the game feels a bit rushed and a little off, but that one is a glaring hole in it.

Chimpzy:

Tanis:
Speaking of pirates, Skies of Arcadia was an awesome game, however the random encounters did get really annoying when you were trying to get somewhere.

Yup. I played the Legends version on Gamecube, which tones down the random battles, but I was still pleased as punch when I got the item that lowers them even more. The original rate must've been something.

That was the version I played and if that reduced the random encounters, I would of hated to of played the Dreamcast version.

Any forced stealth section in an action game esp when it doesn't make any sense why you'd be sneaking around. I'm looking at you Gerudo Fortress from OoT.

Really hate monopoly. In the words of one reader: "The game carries on too long whilst the majority of players slip slowly into debt, an experience I get enough of in real life, to be honest.

Arnhem rail bridge map (as Allies), Close Combat: A Bridge Too Far.

First thing you fight on in Grand Campaign/Arnhem Campaign. And you...

A: Have to commit to either take it ir leave it...

B: Without sacrificing too many soldiers on the necessary approach if you do commit. Which will so often have a MG42 team and/or Schutzen + reserve unit(s) on Veteran+. As your casualties and requisition points you spent will come back to bite you soon, and you have a long fight before you get to Arnhem bridge proper.

C: ... or let it explode, and be denied your one and only escape and easy source of requisition points for the rest of the Arnhem sector, whether to reinforce your holding the bridge or if the rest of the sector goes arse over.

It's hard, the first map you'll play in the Grand Campaign, and Arnhem Sector is ridiculously hard to begin with and you cannot wait very long to press the assault towards Arnhem bridge. As a new player it will screw you over when you inevitably fail it on your first try and just forget about it.

It's hard to call it bad, because it's kind of awesome if you do lose it. It makes the rest of the Arnhem battles all the more nailbiting... where you will have that PIAT team that will survive multiple battles, and numerous tank kills under their name. Hanging on for dear life as you wait for XXX Corps.

The sewer level from VTMB. I think the devs later said that they were forced to rush it though.

Dalisclock:

erttheking:
Frostfound in Sunless Sea. A miserable trek that will deal damage to your character and will screw you over if you don't bring the right equipment and/or are there for a quest.

...No one knows what I'm talking about, do they?

I do. That part of the game I wouldn't blame anyone for trying to save scum through it considering how much the RNG determines how that quest goes.

No freaking kidding. Whatever I get for going in there for the Tireless Mechanic better be worth it game!

https://sunlesssea.gamepedia.com/The_Fulgent_Impeller

....You got lucky.

OT: Oh and Persona is one of my favorite series and I adore Persona 5. But fucking Christ is it's sexualized comedy cringe worthy. The fact that Ryuji suggests than Ann, a girl who was almost sexually assaulted by her teacher, use her body to get information that they need and they do it more than once while Ann clearly isn't happy with it....HOW IS THIS FUNNY!? Because Ann wears a comical amount of sweaters and does a bad British accent? When the set up disgusts me less, I'll let you know. And on the other end of the coin, whenever the girls overreact and beat up one of the boys in that series. Does Atlus just like writing the boys in their games as perverted assholes and the girls as violent assholes for half baked comedy scenes

I wouldn't necessarily call this a "bad" part, but most definitely the part of Dark Souls that has been a constant sore spot with me is the NPCs and how apparently disconnected they are from the world around them and just how... unrealistically (I guess?) they're implemented in games about decaying worlds of constant and brutal danger, disconnected from and out of place in the broader experience and where you find them most times just makes no sense as it is directly contrary to the spirit of the game.

How did Siegmeyer find himself in Anor Londo before me? The Iron Giant seemed well and intact when I reached him; I've got the axe wounds to prove it.

Solaire's just chilling at a bonfire surrounded by lava after the Centipede Demon boss arena? Did you find an Orange Charred Ring in a Crackerjack box or something, Sun Fucker?

Lucatile must have just moseyed through The Gutter to make it to Black Gulch where she chooses to make a 10 foot drop onto a hidden ledge then lean up against a wall in pitch blackness?

Merchant Hag Melentia, I'm not even going to ASK how you managed to make it to Majula from the Cardinal Tower; you're 150 years old and carrying everything you own on your back; I guess undead hollows respect their elders...

And I'm the only one in this world that ever needs anything; who's keeping the myriad Merchants in business? The worlds of Souls games seem like piss poor places to become a small business owner (unless, of course, you're in the business of snuff films.)

The NPCs would fit better if they were in peaceful hub areas (like Majula in DS2) where it might be feasible that whatever few normal people there are left might be reasonably safe from the likes of mindless, violent hollows and ancient demons that populate the fringes of polite society. Or, if they absolutely feel it necessarily to pepper NPC throughout the game world, at least put them there upon subsequent visits so I could at least delude myself into believing that they "followed" in the relative safety of my wake.

Xprimentyl:
I wouldn?t necessarily call this a ?bad? part, but most definitely the part of Dark Souls that has been a constant sore spot with me is the NPCs and how apparently disconnected they are from the world around them and just how? unrealistically (I guess?) they?re implemented in games about decaying worlds of constant and brutal danger, disconnected from and out of place in the broader experience and where you find them most times just makes no sense as it is directly contrary to the spirit of the game.

How did Siegmeyer find himself in Anor Londo before me? The Iron Giant seemed well and intact when I reached him; I?ve got the axe wounds to prove it.

Solaire?s just chilling at a bonfire surrounded by lava after the Centipede Demon boss arena? Did you find an Orange Charred Ring in a Crackerjack box or something, Sun Fucker?

Lucatile must have just moseyed through The Gutter to make it to Black Gulch where she chooses to make a 10 foot drop onto a hidden ledge then lean up against a wall in pitch blackness?

Merchant Hag Melentia, I?m not even going to ASK how you managed to make it to Majula from the Cardinal Tower; you?re 150 years old and carrying everything you own on your back; I guess undead hollows respect their elders?

And I?m the only one in this world that ever needs anything; who?s keeping the myriad Merchants in business? The worlds of Souls games seem like piss poor places to become a small business owner (unless, of course, you?re in the business of snuff films.)

The NPCs would fit better if they were in peaceful hub areas (like Majula in DS2) where it might be feasible that whatever few normal people there are left might be reasonably safe from the likes of mindless, violent hollows and ancient demons that populate the fringes of polite society. Or, if they absolutely feel it necessarily to pepper NPC throughout the game world, at least put them there upon subsequent visits so I could at least delude myself into believing that they ?followed? in the relative safety of my wake.

The general theory I beleive is supposed to be that they're mostly in their own worlds and whatever universe imploding timey wimey thing just happens to criss-cross you into them. Though you'd think that would make some of the static ones also go in and out (you could alrgue Firelink shrine has a stability shield or something, but there's dudes just out in the world too who are always there)

gameicreate upload:
Really hate monopoly. In the words of one reader: ?The game carries on too long whilst the majority of players slip slowly into debt, an experience I get enough of in real life, to be honest.

This is only true if you don't play by the official rules.

Money on Free Parking, double salary for landing on Go, throwing the Income Tax, Luxury Tax and Money from Pay Cards into the center just prolongs the game. The more money you throw into the game, the longer it takes to bankrupt people.

It took me too many years of playing with house rules to figure this out.

Xprimentyl:
I wouldn?t necessarily call this a ?bad? part, but most definitely the part of Dark Souls that has been a constant sore spot with me is the NPCs and how apparently disconnected they are from the world around them and just how? unrealistically (I guess?) they?re implemented in games about decaying worlds of constant and brutal danger, disconnected from and out of place in the broader experience and where you find them most times just makes no sense as it is directly contrary to the spirit of the game

Repeat after me:

Time is convoluted in Lordran.

Also something something multiple worlds that occasionally intersect, which is the in-game reason the phantoms exist.

I wish I had something better for you but I don't. It's pretty much a way to justify the multiplayer.

The fucking Fade in Dragon Age: Origins.

Sewer "dungeon" in Vampire: The Masquerade.

Probing planets in Mass Effect II.

Typically any area of a game that creates a significant change of pace for an extended period of time.

erttheking:
Frostfound in Sunless Sea. A miserable trek that will deal damage to your character and will screw you over if you don't bring the right equipment and/or are there for a quest.

...No one knows what I'm talking about, do they?

I never did anything in Frostfound. You had to get so many attributes in different areas it become pointless. Empire of the Hands was an ending that was really annoying and I never tried.

OT: Ending to ME3. I don't hate the ending like most but from Earth onwards, the game is pretty bad.

Not a single game but having done the entire Metal Gear series over the last year I noticed there's certain bits that can be used as shorthand for bad, bad writing.

Among them(Beware Spoilers):


I enjoyed the series, but Kojimas writing is....special.

Abomination:

Probing planets in Mass Effect II.

Haha! I know I'm in the minority by far and away, but that was actually one of my FAVORITE parts of ME2! I don't know why, but I found it very relaxing. With the famous ME map music floating aimlessly in the background, probing the planets became a Zen-like experience; I spent inordinate amounts of time doing it, often in lieu of doing missions and progressing the story.

The literal 'press X to not die' sections of Bayonetta. Most of the game is fantastic, but when you die because you didn't react fast enough to someone shouting 'hit the button now! oh, you missed it? GAME OVER, BITCH!', it kills the momentum something awful. And it's not even like the input is something you'd do in gameplay anyway, since for most of them you just press the X button.

At least the unpredictable instant-kill QTEs were entirely removed from the sequel.

Xprimentyl:

Abomination:

Probing planets in Mass Effect II.

Haha! I know I?m in the minority by far and away, but that was actually one of my FAVORITE parts of ME2! I don?t know why, but I found it very relaxing. With the famous ME map music floating aimlessly in the background, probing the planets became a Zen-like experience; I spent inordinate amounts of time doing it, often in lieu of doing missions and progressing the story.

So, how do you feel strip mining entire planets and collapsing their economies so you can upgrade your SMG, you monster?
/joke

Sorry, I'm ambivalent towards that particular mechanic but Stolen Pixels pretty much made it impossible to play that bit of ME2 without thinking "Man, Shepherd is a selfish jerk, robbing entire planets of their resources because s/he needs a better gun".

I felt the same way in MGSV where Venom spends all of Diamond Dogs money adding a scope to his favorite gun, or buying armor for his horse, adding insult to injury to all the guys working for him that he press ganged in the first place.

I love RTS games.

That moment that takes me out of it is when you're playing a FFA... and everyone attacks you only. We're talking civs/races who are on the polar opposite side of the map from you sends in troops to attack you. And once you beat them, the people right next to you send in troops... And once you beat them, people from the middle of the map sends in troops.

Age of Empires 3 was horrible with this.

ObsidianJones:
I love RTS games.

That moment that takes me out of it is when you're playing a FFA... and everyone attacks you only. We're talking civs/races who are on the polar opposite side of the map from you sends in troops to attack you. And once you beat them, the people right next to you send in troops... And once you beat them, people from the middle of the map sends in troops.

Age of Empires 3 was horrible with this.

Its probably a performance optimization. Everything centers on you so its not jamming up your game inexplicably to have AI's fight each other off in a corner somewhere.

Or its just AI in general. Getting AI to prioritize fighting multiple opponents is quite a chore, whether its in a strategy game or an RPG or an FPS. Almost always once you interrupt any in-progress combat everything focuses on you.

ObsidianJones:
I love RTS games.

That moment that takes me out of it is when you're playing a FFA... and everyone attacks you only. We're talking civs/races who are on the polar opposite side of the map from you sends in troops to attack you. And once you beat them, the people right next to you send in troops... And once you beat them, people from the middle of the map sends in troops.

Age of Empires 3 was horrible with this.

Not an RTS game but there is an older 4X type game called Imperialism. The game requires you to do a lot of infrastructure investment to keep your population from starving, let alone keep your economy humming. Oh, and don't forget your military must remain above a certain invisible threshold of power/strength at all times.

If you do neglect the military part, you'll start a turn to be greeted with the newspaper informing you that EVERY SINGLE OTHER POWER in the world has declared war on you at the exact same time(and it doesn't matter how good your relationships were with them just prior to this). And since your military is already behind the curve to prompt this, you might as well just start a new game at this point because there's no way in hell you're gonna win against those odds.

Yeah, that's the big reason I never finished a game of Imperialism, due the AI opponents all ganging up on you because you were too busy keeping building your railroads up so you could transport enough food to avoid starvation.

Any segment of a game where your controls get reversed.

I'd say the Xel'lotath campaign in Eternal Darkness: Sanity's Requiem was for me the weakness of the three. I didn't like the design of her creatures that some had this strange glyph floating where their heads should have been, that I thought looked silly.

I also thought she wasn't as interesting as the other two ancients.

I recently replayed Metroid: Zero Mission and the Space Pirate Mothership section was annoying as fuck. It's a forced stealth section, which I already stated that I hate, but there are moments where getting spotted is unavoidable and all you can do is run like hell until you can find a hiding spot.

Abomination:
The fucking Fade in Dragon Age: Origins.

Sewer "dungeon" in Vampire: The Masquerade.

Probing planets in Mass Effect II.

Typically any area of a game that creates a significant change of pace for an extended period of time.

I loved the Fade mission in Dragon Age: Origins!!
Until I finished the first section and realized it was 1 of 7!
Plus you have to do them in a certain order or backtrack a lot, Christ I was thrilled when that was over

The sewer level in Arkham Asylum.
The sewer level in Nioh
The 'poison mine' in Nioh. Essentially, any section with status effects sucks.
The tank-related 'boss fights' in Arkham Knight (almost ruined the game for me)
The 'Find Dandoline' questline in Witcher 3. When Gerald says: 'now we have to put on a play,' I almost threw my controller. SO tedious!
As stated above, those archers in New Londo.
The entire 'Dead Money' section of Fallout: New Vegas. Great voice acting and story, but some of the worst gameplay I've ever encountered.
The 'Big Daddy' section of Bioshock.

Tartarus from the very first God of War game. The developers have even admitted they didn't have time to playtest it beforehand, so its needlessly punishing in the most banal way

Any RTS (or even Valkayie Chronilces) that has a section will a small contingent of units you need to keep alive. VC had a mission where you had to time yourself between blasts and spotlights or something. I tried it one and just gave up. What an unpleasant way to finish.

That bit in Bloodborne's Nightmare Frontier where the giant brain fires undodgeable arrows that cause Frenzy at you.
Bloodborne is my favourite game of all time (I've even got a Hunter's Mark tattoo), but when I remember that bit, all I think is 'this is gunna suck...'

The amoebas in Metro 2033. A big issue here is that segment being an 'escort mission'. The guy you are escorting won't shoot the amoebas from a distance but walk up to them and fire down point blank. Big issue is that these guys are basically banelings, self destruct bastards. They would spawn infinitely as well. For a game all about ammo conservation and shit - it sure was an absolute ammo sink. I heard they fixed it in the redux edition.

I also don't like it when RPGs remove characters from you. Especially tactical RPGs where characters level up through active kills. In La Pucelle Tactics, I kinda put all my resources into two characters. I was going for an approach where those characters were super min maxed glass cannons and could oneshot most things and exploited the fact that the AI went for the weakest characters. Just flood the enemy with meat shields while my main two took them apart piecemeal.

Both leave the party and one doesn't even come back. That was very unpleasant and I had to go out of my way to grind up some new characters.

Has anyone mentioned the bullet sponging goon on the train in Uncharted 2?

Or any bullet sponge for that matter.

Or any game where you hack, hack, hack away at a non-reacting enemy with only a life bar to judge how much it's being damaged before the inevitable death animation. It's been tough going in getting past this outdated design, though some games have shown signs.

I think that the industry should be able to move past it by the middle of next gen.

hanselthecaretaker:
Has anyone mentioned the bullet sponging goon on the train in Uncharted 2?

Or any bullet sponge for that matter.

Or any game where you hack, hack, hack away at a non-reacting enemy with only a life bar to judge how much it?s being damaged before the inevitable death animation. It?s been tough going in getting past this outdated design, though some games have shown signs.

I think that the industry should be able to move past it by the middle of next gen.

I guess this is an example of a pad part in a bad game, but being no stranger to bullet sponges, I was particularly put off by the Wardens in Halo"PissantingPieceOfShitWasteOfTimeAndMoney" 5. IIRC, the very first encounter, I had NO idea I was doing damage; nothing indicated my bullets were doing anything; I kept thinking it was a gimmick fight and jumped around looking for the "trick." Eventually he just... died. I was like "Oh. Well... ok."

Foxcubwendigo:
That bit in Bloodborne's Nightmare Frontier where the giant brain fires undodgeable arrows that cause Frenzy at you.
Bloodborne is my favourite game of all time (I've even got a Hunter's Mark tattoo), but when I remember that bit, all I think is 'this is gunna suck...'

You mean the Nightmare of Mensis? I remember the brain monster caused frenzy in the open, but I don't remember something like that in the Nightmare Frontier. Unless the amgydala boss did it and I'm forgetting...

Got another one. Been playing a lot of Battletech lately. Its great turn based mech fun, even if its a little poorly designed. You gotta balance resources and time and mechwarrior health and it can get really obnoxious.

But one thing I'm really finding annoying it how missions rate difficulty. The rating it only based on how heavy the mechs are, regardless of objective. So a mission where you're in a scorching dessert with sandstorms and you have a limited amount of time to break into a complex, free prisoners and escort them through an enemy patrol to a LZ and hold out until retrieval is rated a 1/5 because there's only a few smaller chicken walker mechs and medium vehicles.
Whereas a giant flat moonscape battle against 4 Assault Mechs is considered a 5/5 difficulty. And there's no tactics involved, no special objectives or time limits or environment to consider. Its just a punch-for-punch boring ass time consuming brawl between huge mechs.

Any stealth section in any game that has an auto-fail-if-caught/seen condition. They are the worst part of any game, even games that are primarily stealth games.

Escort missions. Fuck those. And I mean actual stealth missions, not Bioshock Infinite/The Last of Us/God of War non-escort missions. I mean, "Protect this person that has a health bar as we throw all manner of bullshit at you" Fuck those in all games that have them.

Getting specific now, Jonbodhi mentioned the Batmobile already, but I found every activity that wasn't puzzle solving or just driving around Gotham to be a pain in the ass. The boat stealth sections were bad enough in Black Flag, no one wanted more! The riddler races were not fun and became a slog after dying 20 times. If they just kept it to puzzle solving I'd be more than happy.

Fire Emblem Fate's weird intimate time with allies. I was on the side of "Leave everything in!" when it was announced that the... petting would be removed from the localized version. Now I wish the entire idea was scrapped or replaced with something less awkward.

Captain Marvelous:
Any stealth section in any game that has an auto-fail-if-caught/seen condition. They are the worst part of any game, even games that are primarily stealth games.

Escort missions. Fuck those. And I mean actual stealth missions, not Bioshock Infinite/The Last of Us/God of War non-escort missions. I mean, "Protect this person that has a health bar as we throw all manner of bullshit at you" Fuck those in all games that have them.

I will add Stealth sections in games not designed with stealth mechanics. You know who you are and why you suck.

Escort missions can work, but only if the escort isn't suicidal and you have decent margin for error. Which unfortunately escort missions often can't be bothered with.

I'm playing The Last Guardian right now and it's amusing to realize that the Trico is pretty much escorting you the entire game, but your job is to help him bypass obstacles like locked gates and those symbols he's terrified of.

Dalisclock:
I'm playing The Last Guardian right now and it's amusing to realize that the Trico is pretty much escorting you the entire game, but your job is to help him bypass obstacles like locked gates and those symbols he's terrified of.

Haha, I'm surprised people had a hard time getting Trico to go the right way when you were, in fact, being lead. Hope you're enjoying the game, it may be my favorite PS4 game.

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