How would you introduce shooter, racing, and sports gamers to different genres?

I know an average Joe type guy who plays only shooters and racing. How would you introduce this type of gamer to other genres? Game worlds such as Horizon Zero Dawn, The Witcher, Mass Effect, Dragon Age, Zelda, Knights of the Old Republic, To The Moon, Final Fantasy VII and IX etc. are spectacular and creative! Would the average Joe be blown away or bored so much that they would sleep?

Before 2014 I only played CoD, C&C, and Halo as well as Medal of Honor. Then in December 2013 I finally got bored of modern military crap and experienced To The Moon and the first Mass Effect. This was at a time I haven't figured out RPGs. I remember going to a sidequest planet with enemies with a higher level than my character and getting decimated. I then decided to quit for a little while and then decided to play it again and make an effort to learn how to play an RPG since I wanted to find out how ME1's story ended.

That game also gave me a sense of wonder. Has any game gave you that feeling?

Perhaps I always loved universes created by creative people such as Stargate SG-1 and C&C which is the first video game universe I loved.

Does it take a certain type of person to enjoy a video game that has its own universe and character development?

Just lend them the games? Not too many folks will turn the nose up at something that costs nothing to try.

Finding some adjacent material would likely be the best bet. IF they're all about those sort of inherently gameplay focused stuff, throw some action type fare in there, don't jump straight to the 40 hour dialogue laden RPGs. If they're big on the miltary stuff, then yeah, use Command and Conquer and not Warcraft to introduce the concept of an RTS. Big on multiplayer, then try Borderlands/Division/Destiny/Warframe/et al where you can do a co-op experience and kind of introduce some of the ideas rather then jumping into Souls or Diablos.

CaptJohnSheridan:
Does it take a certain type of person to enjoy a video game that has its own universe and character development?

Of course. Maybe this person just wants to escape from stories and universes and characters and enjoy the sense of release that action-based games gives them.

Why are you trying to get this person into these type of games, if I may ask?

Blood Brain Barrier:

CaptJohnSheridan:
Does it take a certain type of person to enjoy a video game that has its own universe and character development?

Of course. Maybe this person just wants to escape from stories and universes and characters and enjoy the sense of release that action-based games gives them.

Why are you trying to get this person into these type of games, if I may ask?

Basically this. Some people just aren't interested in narrative driven games. They play games for a competitive rush or the sheer spectacle of an over-the-top shooter. There's nothing wrong with that and there's no reason to feel compelled to change their mind.

It all varies greatly from person-to-person obviously. I'd say generally finding a game with a theme they really love would probably be the best way to do it because they would probably be open to the experience just based on theme alone. I would shy away from RPGs to start because most of them are so concerned with wasting player time that someone that's not used to their elements would probably get bored plus RPGs usually do have pretty bad writing because they're video games and the medium hardly has any writing talent, and they'd probably be like 'why am I playing this garbage for a story when I can watch any number of TV shows that have far better writing.' I never did play the 1st Mass Effect, but 2 and 3 are good RPGs for new players in the sense that the characters are strong along with both games being very light on the RPG elements that waste time like no horrid inventory management or loot systems, the games really just give you the good stuff (which many RPGs do not at all accomplish). Horizon is another good example, it not only looks great but has good combat (a rarity for RPGs) and it's very light on the boring shit; the world isn't too big, there's very few collectibles and only 40-something quests total in the whole game. I also try to suggest shorter games that don't require such a time commitment. Something like a Dishonored game could be good, there's a lot of lore and stuff to find in the world if one really gets sucked into the game but at the same time you can ignore that stuff and playthrough the levels rather quickly. Plus, there's a lot of wacky fun stuff via the powers that the player can indulge in vs having to play a hardcore slow stealth game like most stealth games force you into.

JUMBO PALACE:

Blood Brain Barrier:

CaptJohnSheridan:
Does it take a certain type of person to enjoy a video game that has its own universe and character development?

Of course. Maybe this person just wants to escape from stories and universes and characters and enjoy the sense of release that action-based games gives them.

Why are you trying to get this person into these type of games, if I may ask?

Basically this. Some people just aren't interested in narrative driven games. They play games for a competitive rush or the sheer spectacle of an over-the-top shooter. There's nothing wrong with that and there's no reason to feel compelled to change their mind.

I don't know. The sense of wonder feels so good that it's natural to want to encourage others who haven't ever experienced it to have it. Although the same thing can be said about the sheer sense of accomplishment that hard games like Dark Souls and Bloodborne give. The funny thing is that lots of people play the soulsborne games just for the sense of wonder.

I'm not sure if I would bother. Often people who only play sports/shooter games tend to either prefer a more social experience or just don't want to spend that much time on games. I have a friend who pretty much just plays console multiplayer shooters and cinematic blockbuster games like Uncharted. But he's way more social than me and prefers going to parties. I rather avoid parties and sit at home spending another 8 hours on some RPG I've already clocked 40+ hours on.

Anyway Steam makes it really easy to gift games. If he does play PC games and has a steam account, as long as you have some reason to give him a thing(birthdays, favours, whatever ezpz) - it might encourage him to try something different. Though at the same time he might never install it.

My niece was "Minecraft only" but has become a more well rounded gamer by being first introduced to Bioshock Infinite. Now we play Borderlands with her brother and I bought her Stardew Valley so we can try out the multiplayer together. Its just a question of finding something they like. I was pretty down on anime because my first exposure was some pseudo tentacle porn movie and then a friend trying to get me into Dragonball. Years later it turns out I love anime, I just don't like tentacle porn and shounen. Its just a question of hitting someone with something they will like.

I wouldn't. Fun is a nonrenewable resource and I want as much of it for myself as possible

My go to is to find out something they already like and then find them a corresponding game/anime/book/etc that 'feels' like the thing they already like.

Love Bruce Springsteen's 'Born In The USA' because of it's depressing nature while sung in a patriotic way?
Why not try Manowar's 'Shellshock'?

Love Fast n' Furious, but also kind of like Mario Kart?
Why not try PS3's 'Blur'?

Enjoy manic sci-fi series/films with cheese galore?
You might enjoy the game play and plot of PS3's has Vanquish.

Etc. Etc. Etc.

 

Reply to Thread

Log in or Register to Comment
Have an account? Login below:
With Facebook:Login With Facebook
or
Username:  
Password:  
  
Not registered? To sign up for an account with The Escapist:
Register With Facebook
Register With Facebook
or
Register for a free account here