Will Esports ever be as popular as regular sports?

Do you think Esports will ever become as popular as football, basketball or baseball? Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?

Maybe when playing them becomes as easy to access as a ball. This is why the biggest games are f2p, the barrier to entry is just too high. And even those require you to own a system to run them on even if they're f2p.

Though they will become a lot more popular than they are right now when all the people alive are ones that grew up in a world as saturated with gaming as the world was saturated with sports in years past.

VG_Addict:
Do you think Esports will ever become as popular as football, basketball or baseball? Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?

Hahahaha!! No.

They'll gain in popularity, maybe even legitimacy, but you'll never see it vying for air time on the major networks like football, basketball or baseball. You'll never see collegiate E-athletes getting full ride scholarships. You'll never see a singular professional player signing a +$100 million, 4-year contract. You'll never see 85,000 people pay hundreds of dollar per ticket to fill up a stadium to watch a bunch of people play a videogame. You might be able to get Cardi B to show up and whore around for a halftime show, but the respect that would garner would be nominal at best.

Dreiko:
Maybe when playing them becomes as easy to access as a ball. This is why the biggest games are f2p, the barrier to entry is just too high. And even those require you to own a system to run them on even if they're f2p.

This is a very good point actually. I've never considered cost of entry before, but it does make sense, especially when just getting started requires at minimum a console or pc and a game, which in many parts of the world can eat an entire month's wages, if not more. Whereas a pittance gets you a ball. Maybe not a good ball, but you are at least playing.

Chimpzy:

Dreiko:
Maybe when playing them becomes as easy to access as a ball. This is why the biggest games are f2p, the barrier to entry is just too high. And even those require you to own a system to run them on even if they're f2p.

This is a very good point actually. I've never considered cost of entry before, but it does make sense, especially when just getting started requires at minimum a console or pc and a game, which in many parts of the world can eat an entire month's wages, if not more. Whereas a pittance gets you a ball. Maybe not a good ball, but you are at least playing.

Yes, this is a valid point, but the test of skills that a videogame presents isn't really comparable to analogue athletics, and thusly the spectacle to watch "the best" will never be the feat that physical athletes offer. You can get on YouTube right now and see video of exceptional, professional E-athletes besting videogames, and 99% of these people are from walks of life like the average Joe with a 9-5 job to the pimple-faced 29-year-old living in his parents' basement still collecting an allowance. Analogue athletes train, push their bodies to their limits, commit at levels most of us could and will never understand, and their stage (the field) is where we bear witness to that in awe. I'm saying those athletes are doing something most can't whereas E-athletes are doing something most probably could at some appreciable level. No, I'm not suggesting anyone can be as good as professional gamers, I'm simply offering that the gap between a casual and professional gamer is nothing compared to the vast gulf between a guy playing flag football in his backyard and the 300-pound lineman who can run a sub-5 second 40-yard dash, and citing the OP's question ("Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?), no, the former will never be as impressive a spectacle as the latter.

Xprimentyl:

VG_Addict:
Do you think Esports will ever become as popular as football, basketball or baseball? Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?

Hahahaha!! No.

They?ll gain in popularity, maybe even legitimacy, but you?ll never see it vying for air time on the major networks like football, basketball or baseball. You?ll never see collegiate E-athletes getting full ride scholarships. You?ll never see a singular professional player signing a +$100 million, 4-year contract. You?ll never see 85,000 people pay hundreds of dollar per ticket to fill up a stadium to watch a bunch of people play a videogame. You might be able to get Cardi B to show up and whore around for a halftime show, but the respect that would garner would be nominal at best.

This. Can you imagine LoL players getting hundreds of millions to sign up for teams? It'll never happen.

Silentpony:

Xprimentyl:

VG_Addict:
Do you think Esports will ever become as popular as football, basketball or baseball? Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?

Hahahaha!! No.

They?ll gain in popularity, maybe even legitimacy, but you?ll never see it vying for air time on the major networks like football, basketball or baseball. You?ll never see collegiate E-athletes getting full ride scholarships. You?ll never see a singular professional player signing a +$100 million, 4-year contract. You?ll never see 85,000 people pay hundreds of dollar per ticket to fill up a stadium to watch a bunch of people play a videogame. You might be able to get Cardi B to show up and whore around for a halftime show, but the respect that would garner would be nominal at best.

This. Can you imagine LoL players getting hundreds of millions to sign up for teams? It'll never happen.

I can imagine it, but in that dystopian nightmare, 99% of the human species has atrophied from the neck down, and all legit sports have been outlawed, the playing of which in any capacity save for virtually is punishable by death by edict of a ruthless, autocratic dictator.

Silentpony:

Xprimentyl:

VG_Addict:
Do you think Esports will ever become as popular as football, basketball or baseball? Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?

Hahahaha!! No.

They?ll gain in popularity, maybe even legitimacy, but you?ll never see it vying for air time on the major networks like football, basketball or baseball. You?ll never see collegiate E-athletes getting full ride scholarships. You?ll never see a singular professional player signing a +$100 million, 4-year contract. You?ll never see 85,000 people pay hundreds of dollar per ticket to fill up a stadium to watch a bunch of people play a videogame. You might be able to get Cardi B to show up and whore around for a halftime show, but the respect that would garner would be nominal at best.

This. Can you imagine LoL players getting hundreds of millions to sign up for teams? It'll never happen.

And thank fuck for that, says I

Short answer: no.
Long answer: mais non.

OK, could Esports be viewed by as many people as regular season sports?

Chimpzy:

Dreiko:
Maybe when playing them becomes as easy to access as a ball. This is why the biggest games are f2p, the barrier to entry is just too high. And even those require you to own a system to run them on even if they're f2p.

This is a very good point actually. I've never considered cost of entry before, but it does make sense, especially when just getting started requires at minimum a console or pc and a game, which in many parts of the world can eat an entire month's wages, if not more. Whereas a pittance gets you a ball. Maybe not a good ball, but you are at least playing.

Hell, you don't even really need a ball in some cases. When I was a kid we used to play with stomped down soda cans because teachers wouldn't allow us to use balls during non-gym recess.

But yeah, this is why soccer is really popular in a lot of poor places. No barrier to entry and can be played with as many or as few people as you have and you don't need an extra ball for each person, hell, you don't even need shoes for all of them lol.

VG_Addict:
OK, could Esports be viewed by as many people as regular season sports?

No, for all the same reasons I listed above. Gaming is simply too accessible for professional gamers to interest the not-already-interested masses enough to merit much more than the niche, novelty viewership it enjoys right now. No one is going to want to waste their time or money gawking at a bunch of virgins playing the exact same games their antisocial 14-year-old kid holes up in his room playing for hours on end every day.

No. But money can still be made off it.

No, because most of the time you actually have to play the game to find it enjoyable to watch.

It's not very likely, but regular sports has problems that could degrade the prestige it has, mainly doping and corruption, but also from the entertainment value being sometimes tied to nasty things that break athletes and end their careers.

The games themselves form the biggest problem in esports, because they are copyrighted material played on servers that are at the whims of the publisher. Some competitive games are interesting to watch, no doubt about that, but within the game innovation is usually patch-related and doesn't compare favorably to the most popular skill sports. Esports is also 99% male and women's leagues don't exist, but those are often rather poor in regular sports too. Of course, there is so much variety that it doesn't really matter.

Esports has only existed for 20 years and been mainstream for maybe 5 if even that (excluding the Korean scene). Nobody knows what the pro gaming landscape will look like in 2040, but traditional sports will be more or less like now.

Well people are growing up with games, so maybe in a century once people are always online.

Thought I should apologize for my doubt in esport's viability as I'm quarantined and watching NASCAR's iRacing right now. Guess it takes a plague and pure desperation to bring people in.

Xprimentyl:

VG_Addict:
Do you think Esports will ever become as popular as football, basketball or baseball? Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?

Hahahaha!! No.

They?ll gain in popularity, maybe even legitimacy, but you?ll never see it vying for air time on the major networks like football, basketball or baseball. You?ll never see collegiate E-athletes getting full ride scholarships. You?ll never see a singular professional player signing a +$100 million, 4-year contract. You?ll never see 85,000 people pay hundreds of dollar per ticket to fill up a stadium to watch a bunch of people play a videogame. You might be able to get Cardi B to show up and whore around for a halftime show, but the respect that would garner would be nominal at best.

I'd agree with the stadiums part, but I get the feeling that 50 years or so from now everything else you've said will be proven wrong. It certainly won't happen until the games chosen are less incomprehensible to understand for entry level viewers though.

Xprimentyl:
the test of skills that a videogame presents isn?t really comparable to analogue athletics, and thusly the spectacle to watch ?the best? will never be the feat that physical athletes offer. You can get on YouTube right now and see video of exceptional, professional E-athletes besting videogames, and 99% of these people are from walks of life like the average Joe with a 9-5 job to the pimple-faced 29-year-old living in his parents? basement still collecting an allowance. Analogue athletes train, push their bodies to their limits, commit at levels most of us could and will never understand, and their stage (the field) is where we bear witness to that in awe. I?m saying those athletes are doing something most can?t whereas E-athletes are doing something most probably could at some appreciable level. No, I?m not suggesting anyone can be as good as professional gamers, I?m simply offering that the gap between a casual and professional gamer is nothing compared to the vast gulf between a guy playing flag football in his backyard and the 300-pound lineman who can run a sub-5 second 40-yard dash, and citing the OP?s question (?Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?), no, the former will never be as impressive a spectacle as the latter.

Considering we've already got insanely popular youtube sports that involve no player training or skill whatsoever, I'd say all that training stuff is a moot point. Sure e-sports are in their infancy compared to established analogue sports, but it is bound to happen eventually, and has already begun.

I mean, just look at this: Half a million subscribers and over 10 million views on this video about marbles rolling around. It's dressed up like a big televised sport, everybody knows it's not, and yet nobody cares- they watch it anyway. Diddly squat training or mental readiness or any of that stuff. Doesn't matter in the slightest.

Here's another one- some dude going the whole hog in dressing up Hot Wheel toy car racing like it's a big televised event, even commentating about the cars like they've got actual drivers who've trained for this and have their strategies and weaknesses. It's all fantasy and it doesn't even matter. People are loving it all the same.

Now if stuff like that can get popular, then it's only a matter of time before e-sports expands to unheard of heights.

Squilookle:

Xprimentyl:

VG_Addict:
Do you think Esports will ever become as popular as football, basketball or baseball? Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?

Hahahaha!! No.

They?ll gain in popularity, maybe even legitimacy, but you?ll never see it vying for air time on the major networks like football, basketball or baseball. You?ll never see collegiate E-athletes getting full ride scholarships. You?ll never see a singular professional player signing a +$100 million, 4-year contract. You?ll never see 85,000 people pay hundreds of dollar per ticket to fill up a stadium to watch a bunch of people play a videogame. You might be able to get Cardi B to show up and whore around for a halftime show, but the respect that would garner would be nominal at best.

I'd agree with the stadiums part, but I get the feeling that 50 years or so from now everything else you've said will be proven wrong. It certainly won't happen until the games chosen are less incomprehensible to understand for entry level viewers though.

Xprimentyl:
the test of skills that a videogame presents isn?t really comparable to analogue athletics, and thusly the spectacle to watch ?the best? will never be the feat that physical athletes offer. You can get on YouTube right now and see video of exceptional, professional E-athletes besting videogames, and 99% of these people are from walks of life like the average Joe with a 9-5 job to the pimple-faced 29-year-old living in his parents? basement still collecting an allowance. Analogue athletes train, push their bodies to their limits, commit at levels most of us could and will never understand, and their stage (the field) is where we bear witness to that in awe. I?m saying those athletes are doing something most can?t whereas E-athletes are doing something most probably could at some appreciable level. No, I?m not suggesting anyone can be as good as professional gamers, I?m simply offering that the gap between a casual and professional gamer is nothing compared to the vast gulf between a guy playing flag football in his backyard and the 300-pound lineman who can run a sub-5 second 40-yard dash, and citing the OP?s question (?Will the finals of say, an Overwatch tournament be viewed by as many people as the Super Bowl?), no, the former will never be as impressive a spectacle as the latter.

Considering we've already got insanely popular youtube sports that involve no player training or skill whatsoever, I'd say all that training stuff is a moot point. Sure e-sports are in their infancy compared to established analogue sports, but it is bound to happen eventually, and has already begun.

I mean, just look at this: Half a million subscribers and over 10 million views on this video about marbles rolling around. It's dressed up like a big televised sport, everybody knows it's not, and yet nobody cares- they watch it anyway. Diddly squat training or mental readiness or any of that stuff. Doesn't matter in the slightest.

Here's another one- some dude going the whole hog in dressing up Hot Wheel toy car racing like it's a big televised event, even commentating about the cars like they've got actual drivers who've trained for this and have their strategies and weaknesses. It's all fantasy and it doesn't even matter. People are loving it all the same.

Now if stuff like that can get popular, then it's only a matter of time before e-sports expands to unheard of heights.

The question was whether or not esports could ever be as popular as major league sports. Millions of views on YouTube do not equate to network viewership or physical attendance at stadiums, arenas or ball parks. There's a video of a cat farting with +10 million views; that says nothing about the quality or appeal of cat flatulence; all it does is prove that people with too much time on their hands are willing to watch some weird shit. I've no doubt that esports will garner increased popularity, but it will be a cold day in hell when they'll rival the draw of say Monday Night Football, March Madness or the World Series.

Xprimentyl:

The question was whether or not esports could ever be as popular as major league sports. Millions of views on YouTube do not equate to network viewership or physical attendance at stadiums, arenas or ball parks.

I recognise those youtube numbers are just a drop in the ocean at the moment. But they're probably only going to grow.

Xprimentyl:

I?ve no doubt that esports will garner increased popularity, but it will be a cold day in hell when they?ll rival the draw of say Monday Night Football, March Madness or the World Series.

People said that about movies when they first appeared too. Same for video games. Bicycles. The light bulb. Submarines. The superhero genre etc, etc etc. The first steps on the path never look that impressive, but they are the most important.

Squilookle:

Xprimentyl:

The question was whether or not esports could ever be as popular as major league sports. Millions of views on YouTube do not equate to network viewership or physical attendance at stadiums, arenas or ball parks.

I recognise those youtube numbers are just a drop in the ocean at the moment. But they're probably only going to grow.

Are you suggesting that popularity on YouTube is indicative of a thing's objective popularity hence its legitimacy? That YouTube clicks will inexorably spill over into primetime televised viewership and the mass appeal and following of gamers and non-gamers alike? Because I will staunchly disagree. They already show some competitions on ESPN occassioanlly; you know who watches them? Other gamers who're glad/surprised to see their beloved hobby getting some recognition on the "jocks'" channel. The only discussion I've heard from non-gamers about televising video game competitions has been essentially "why are they televising this?'

Squilookle:

Xprimentyl:

I?ve no doubt that esports will garner increased popularity, but it will be a cold day in hell when they?ll rival the draw of say Monday Night Football, March Madness or the World Series.

People said that about movies when they first appeared too. Same for video games. Bicycles. The light bulb. Submarines. The superhero genre etc, etc etc.

Is that hyperbole? If not, which people said that about those things? Who said the lightbulb was a fad never to supplant the candle? Who said the bicycle was a larf when compared to good old fashion walking or horseback? The things you mentioned were inventions, true innovation. Videogames already exists as a thing that many people do, so simply watching others do that thing will never be a primetime draw for the masses, i.e.: there will never come a time when a typical Sunday afternoon event is firing up the barbecue, icing down beers and inviting the guys over to watch other dudes play League of Legends. Again, I'm not saying spectating professional gamers isn't viable or that there will never be any audience for it; I'm saying in response to the OP, no, it will never be on par with the likes of the multi-BILLION dollar industries of professional sports that already enjoy their own, deserved status and hundreds of years of tradition and following.

Squilookle:
The first steps on the path never look that impressive, but they are the most important.

And if you missed my post on this very subject, I was being facetious, but:

Xprimentyl:
Thought I should apologize for my doubt in esport's viability as I'm quarantined and watching NASCAR's iRacing right now. Guess it takes a plague and pure desperation to bring people in.

I watched this event Sunday. And you know what? It was a farce. We literally laughed out loud at how ridiculous it was compared to actual NASCAR. Looked great for a video game that you or I could go out, buy and enjoy, but it was cartoonish when compared to what it was pretending to be. They had cars clipping through each other, they don't animate pit crews, so cars just stop in the pit box for a couple of seconds before taking off "repaired,", the "wrecks" were poorly realized and nowhere near the violence that for some is a huge draw for watching racing. It was a better than nothing "something" to watch since COVID-19 has effectively cancelled sports, NASCAR included, but given the choice to watch one or the other, any fan of the sport of racing would opt for the real thing.

I'm a gamer too; I know what games have to offer, how far they've come, that more people play them now than ever and how difficulty it is to compete at the professional level. But I'm also a sports fan and I know what it takes to earn a spot on any one of their storied stages as a professional athlete, and that that effort and honor are what people from every walk of life turn out by the millions to watch on gameday. Being really good at a $60 game that anyone can play isn't quite the same...

So "eSports" has its first controversy not a month into its inception. NASCAR driver Kyle Larson drops the "N" bomb on the live stream during a race and is suspended and subsequently fired. I swear, we can't have the nice things, and somehow people find ways to sully the terrible things used to replace the nice things we're accustomed to.

But this is another good reason why eSports will never rival real sports in popularity; not even a month into it and already "videogames" have brought out the worst in someone once thought upstanding and respectable; it also shows those not in the larger loop of the culture that videogames are pretty much what they think they are: toys of the immature.

Maybe. But I think I'll either be an old man or it'll be long after I'm dead before it happens.

One thing we might need is a videogame that doesn't just become obsolete later. Football or soccer doesn't get replaced every 3 years by Soccer 2...

Esports will became more popular than sports once VR really becomes a thing. It will be one of those things where even if you don't have VR, you will instantly understand how hard it would be able to do that like shooting a basketball in real life would be the same as VR basically. Then, you can have real sports taken to the extreme as physical harm wouldn't be a thing. Imagine people actually driving cars playing Rocket League for example, why would you wanna watch any normal driving sport over that?

Phoenixmgs:
Esports will became more popular than sports once VR really becomes a thing. It will be one of those things where even if you don't have VR, you will instantly understand how hard it would be able to do that like shooting a basketball in real life would be the same as VR basically. Then, you can have real sports taken to the extreme as physical harm wouldn't be a thing. Imagine people actually driving cars playing Rocket League for example, why would you wanna watch any normal driving sport over that?

People watch sports BECAUSE of the physical difficulty, BECAUSE of the risks; having exceptional talent mitigated by virtual reality mitigates the appeal. People watch NASCAR to see a good race with a worthy winner, but a huge portion of the draw is the wrecks. People want to see the violence of a huge wreck with flames and cars flipping over, then they want to see the driver somehow, miraculously, emerge unscathed due to the science and technology put into making the cars, while caustic, safe enough for the spectacle of collision. NFL, people like the big hit moments as much as the long receptions and impossible lanes run by skilled running backs; mitigating that with something nearly anyone could replicate in a riskless virtual environment mitigates the appeal of watching those talented athletes who've spent years and huge portions of their lives honing their bodies into the machines that make such spectacle possible. Why watching real racing over Rocket League? Rocket league is a game, something ANYONE, including myself, can play with some level of competency; even bad players are playing the game. Real racing is millions of dollars of investment into a singular vehicle and driver who's trained in the physics, aerodynamics and track conditions that differ from track to track; the good ones learn their craft intimately and their performance shows. I can't do that. You can't do that. Those drivers can. I can control "Joe Montana" and throw a 40 yard bomb to an AI "Jerry Rice" playing Madden 20, but I'll never even taste a single iota of the actual talent it would take to reproduce those results in the real world.

Esports will be a novelty, a pastime, something to watch (as evidenced by the fact that iRacing, Madden and NBA 2K have been a thing since the quarantine,) but when the world opens up again, people aren't going to want to watch videogames; we want SPORTS.

Xprimentyl:

Phoenixmgs:
Esports will became more popular than sports once VR really becomes a thing. It will be one of those things where even if you don't have VR, you will instantly understand how hard it would be able to do that like shooting a basketball in real life would be the same as VR basically. Then, you can have real sports taken to the extreme as physical harm wouldn't be a thing. Imagine people actually driving cars playing Rocket League for example, why would you wanna watch any normal driving sport over that?

People watch sports BECAUSE of the physical difficulty, BECAUSE of the risks; having exceptional talent mitigated by virtual reality mitigates the appeal. People watch NASCAR to see a good race with a worthy winner, but a huge portion of the draw is the wrecks. People want to see the violence of a huge wreck with flames and cars flipping over, then they want to see the driver somehow, miraculously, emerge unscathed due to the science and technology put into making the cars, while caustic, safe enough for the spectacle of collision. NFL, people like the big hit moments as much as the long receptions and impossible lanes run by skilled running backs; mitigating that with something nearly anyone could replicate in a riskless virtual environment mitigates the appeal of watching those talented athletes who?ve spent years and huge portions of their lives honing their bodies into the machines that make such spectacle possible. Why watching real racing over Rocket League? Rocket league is a game, something ANYONE, including myself, can play with some level of competency; even bad players are playing the game. Real racing is millions of dollars of investment into a singular vehicle and driver who?s trained in the physics, aerodynamics and track conditions that differ from track to track; the good ones learn their craft intimately and their performance shows. I can?t do that. You can?t do that. Those drivers can. I can control ?Joe Montana? and throw a 40 yard bomb to an AI ?Jerry Rice? playing Madden 20, but I?ll never even taste a single iota of the actual talent it would take to reproduce those results in the real world.

Esports will be a novelty, a pastime, something to watch (as evidenced by the fact that iRacing, Madden and NBA 2K have been a thing since the quarantine,) but when the world opens up again, people aren?t going to want to watch videogames; we want SPORTS.

VR will be the same test of skill. You can have a player's speed, strength, agility, etc all put into the game as attributes and shooting a basketball, throwing a baseball, driving a car will all be the same as doing it in real life. You could literally have people driving completely real cars in a virtual environment playing Rocket League. Who the hell is going to watch Nascar over that?

Well, there's your answer. Sure it took a pandemic, but for now, they are.

Xprimentyl:
So ?eSports? has its first controversy not a month into its inception. NASCAR driver Kyle Larson drops the ?N? bomb on the live stream during a race and is suspended and subsequently fired. I swear, we can?t have the nice things, and somehow people find ways to sully the terrible things used to replace the nice things we?re accustomed to.

OR he was always an asshole, and safe confine of his own house allowed everyone to see who is he after the mask drops.

But this is another good reason why eSports will never rival real sports in popularity; not even a month into it and already ?videogames? have brought out the worst in someone once thought upstanding and respectable; it also shows those not in the larger loop of the culture that videogames are pretty much what they think they are: toys of the immature.

Do i need to post the unfortunately tired examples of footie fans throwing bananas at black sportsmen? Real sports are hardly unfamiliar to racism, and other kinds of scummy behavior.

MrCalavera:

Xprimentyl:
So ?eSports? has its first controversy not a month into its inception. NASCAR driver Kyle Larson drops the ?N? bomb on the live stream during a race and is suspended and subsequently fired. I swear, we can?t have the nice things, and somehow people find ways to sully the terrible things used to replace the nice things we?re accustomed to.

OR he was always an asshole, and safe confine of his own house allowed everyone to see who is he after the mask drops.

But this is another good reason why eSports will never rival real sports in popularity; not even a month into it and already ?videogames? have brought out the worst in someone once thought upstanding and respectable; it also shows those not in the larger loop of the culture that videogames are pretty much what they think they are: toys of the immature.

Do i need to post the unfortunately tired examples of footie fans throwing bananas at black sportsmen? Real sports are hardly unfamiliar to racism, and other kinds of scummy behavior.

Thank you. One asshole ain't gonna ruin everyone's perception of gamers. If that's the case, then those type of people don't care nor want to understand. And need to take a good look in the mirror or see racism or sexism is not only eSports.

Phoenixmgs:

Xprimentyl:

Phoenixmgs:
Snip

Snip

VR will be the same test of skill. You can have a player's speed, strength, agility, etc all put into the game as attributes and shooting a basketball, throwing a baseball, driving a car will all be the same as doing it in real life. You could literally have people driving completely real cars in a virtual environment playing Rocket League. Who the hell is going to watch Nascar over that?

Absolutely incorrect. VR maybe be able to imitate skills, but they will never be able to reproduce them and hence will never exceed them in spectator value. I cannot run a 4.3 second 40-yard dash; putting me in a virtual environment where I can pretend to does not put me on par with an elite NFL running back. And the other thing your talking about is remote sports; controlling an actual vehicle remotely is an entirely different discussion, though reinforces my point that people will opt to tune in to watch reality over virtual reality every day of the month.

MrCalavera:
Well, there's your answer. Sure it took a pandemic, but for now, they are.

They're the only option right now; once real sports open back up, very few are going to prefer the virtual games. Hell, I've watched more replays of ACTUAL sports than new esports during all of this anyway.

MrCalavera:

Xprimentyl:
So ?eSports? has its first controversy not a month into its inception. NASCAR driver Kyle Larson drops the ?N? bomb on the live stream during a race and is suspended and subsequently fired. I swear, we can?t have the nice things, and somehow people find ways to sully the terrible things used to replace the nice things we?re accustomed to.

OR he was always an asshole, and safe confine of his own house allowed everyone to see who is he after the mask drops.

Absolutely agree. I'm not suggesting video games MADE him into an asshole; I'm suggesting that it reinforces that IDEA in the heads of people who don't play them (y'know, the ones esports might supposedly one day win over on and be on par with actual sports?) that they are indeed what they think they are: toys for the immature.

MrCalavera:

But this is another good reason why eSports will never rival real sports in popularity; not even a month into it and already ?videogames? have brought out the worst in someone once thought upstanding and respectable; it also shows those not in the larger loop of the culture that videogames are pretty much what they think they are: toys of the immature.

Do i need to post the unfortunately tired examples of footie fans throwing bananas at black sportsmen? Real sports are hardly unfamiliar to racism, and other kinds of scummy behavior.

Again, not suggesting their isn't controversy in every manner of sport, and I'll give you credit enough that I believe you knew exactly what I meant and are simply devil's advocating. Who hasn't heard of those on the outside looking in who see video games as the realm of the toxically immature where they spout sexists, racial and general hate speech? And what did those people see when Kyle Larson met their exact expectations on national television?

CoCage:

MrCalavera:

Xprimentyl:
So ?eSports? has its first controversy not a month into its inception. NASCAR driver Kyle Larson drops the ?N? bomb on the live stream during a race and is suspended and subsequently fired. I swear, we can?t have the nice things, and somehow people find ways to sully the terrible things used to replace the nice things we?re accustomed to.

OR he was always an asshole, and safe confine of his own house allowed everyone to see who is he after the mask drops.

But this is another good reason why eSports will never rival real sports in popularity; not even a month into it and already ?videogames? have brought out the worst in someone once thought upstanding and respectable; it also shows those not in the larger loop of the culture that videogames are pretty much what they think they are: toys of the immature.

Do i need to post the unfortunately tired examples of footie fans throwing bananas at black sportsmen? Real sports are hardly unfamiliar to racism, and other kinds of scummy behavior.

Thank you. One asshole ain't gonna ruin everyone's perception of gamers. If that's the case, then those type of people don't care nor want to understand. And need to take a good look in the mirror or see racism or sexism is not only eSports.

See my response above; people's perception of gamers is already tarnished, and we all know that well considering the myriad threads on this very forum where we've discussed the misconceptions surrounding gaming culture; this "one asshole" simply reinforced that negative bias.

Last I'll say on the matter: as long as an option exists to watch a professional athlete do it, those that prefer to watch a kid down the street pretend to do it will be, by far and away, in the minority.

Xprimentyl:

Phoenixmgs:

Xprimentyl:
Snip

VR will be the same test of skill. You can have a player's speed, strength, agility, etc all put into the game as attributes and shooting a basketball, throwing a baseball, driving a car will all be the same as doing it in real life. You could literally have people driving completely real cars in a virtual environment playing Rocket League. Who the hell is going to watch Nascar over that?

Absolutely incorrect. VR maybe be able to imitate skills, but they will never be able to reproduce them and hence will never exceed them in spectator value. I cannot run a 4.3 second 40-yard dash; putting me in a virtual environment where I can pretend to does not put me on par with an elite NFL running back. And the other thing your talking about is remote sports; controlling an actual vehicle remotely is an entirely different discussion, though reinforces my point that people will opt to tune in to watch reality over virtual reality every day of the month.

MrCalavera:
Well, there's your answer. Sure it took a pandemic, but for now, they are.

They're the only option right now; once real sports open back up, very few are going to prefer the virtual games. Hell, I?ve watched more replays of ACTUAL sports than new esports during all of this anyway.

MrCalavera:

Xprimentyl:
So ?eSports? has its first controversy not a month into its inception. NASCAR driver Kyle Larson drops the ?N? bomb on the live stream during a race and is suspended and subsequently fired. I swear, we can?t have the nice things, and somehow people find ways to sully the terrible things used to replace the nice things we?re accustomed to.

OR he was always an asshole, and safe confine of his own house allowed everyone to see who is he after the mask drops.

Absolutely agree. I?m not suggesting video games MADE him into an asshole; I?m suggesting that it reinforces that IDEA in the heads of people who don?t play them (y?know, the ones esports might supposedly one day win over on and be on par with actual sports?) that they are indeed what they think they are: toys for the immature.

MrCalavera:

But this is another good reason why eSports will never rival real sports in popularity; not even a month into it and already ?videogames? have brought out the worst in someone once thought upstanding and respectable; it also shows those not in the larger loop of the culture that videogames are pretty much what they think they are: toys of the immature.

Do i need to post the unfortunately tired examples of footie fans throwing bananas at black sportsmen? Real sports are hardly unfamiliar to racism, and other kinds of scummy behavior.

Again, not suggesting their isn?t controversy in every manner of sport, and I?ll give you credit enough that I believe you knew exactly what I meant and are simply devil?s advocating. Who hasn?t heard of those on the outside looking in who see video games as the realm of the toxically immature where they spout sexists, racial and general hate speech? And what did those people see when Kyle Larson met their exact expectations on national television?

CoCage:

MrCalavera:

OR he was always an asshole, and safe confine of his own house allowed everyone to see who is he after the mask drops.

Do i need to post the unfortunately tired examples of footie fans throwing bananas at black sportsmen? Real sports are hardly unfamiliar to racism, and other kinds of scummy behavior.

Thank you. One asshole ain't gonna ruin everyone's perception of gamers. If that's the case, then those type of people don't care nor want to understand. And need to take a good look in the mirror or see racism or sexism is not only eSports.

See my response above; people?s perception of gamers is already tarnished, and we all know that well considering the myriad threads on this very forum where we?ve discussed the misconceptions surrounding gaming culture; this ?one asshole? simply reinforced that negative bias.

Last I?ll say on the matter: as long as an option exists to watch a professional athlete do it, those that prefer to watch a kid down the street pretend to do it will be, by far and away, in the minority.

OK, you love physical sports, we get it.

But you've still got no basis whatsoever that people watch sport for all that training done behind the scenes. A goal is still great whether it was practiced off the field a thousand times beforehand or if it was a lucky shot done by some plucky newcomer. You place great stock in people caring about the physical state of sportsmen and women. I still say that as long as their moves on the grand stage of sport are impressive enough, people won't give the slightest shit how many bicep curls they did that morning, or ever.

Squilookle:

OK, you love physical sports, we get it.

But you've still got no basis whatsoever that people watch sport for all that training done behind the scenes. A goal is still great whether it was practiced off the field a thousand times beforehand or if it was a lucky shot done by some plucky newcomer. You place great stock in people caring about the physical state of sportsmen and women. I still say that as long as their moves on the grand stage of sport are impressive enough, people won't give the slightest shit how many bicep curls they did that morning, or ever.

You do know why sports are a thing, don't you? I mean, you do know why for literally thousands of years, people have turned out by the thousands to watch those of exceptional physical abilities compete against one another? You do know even the worst of those "plucky newcomers" are still exceedingly more talented than your average Joe, so their even competing is a spectacle to behold because they made it farther than 99% of people could?

In Esports, everyone playing is handed the exact same amount of ability as governed by the rules of the game; the competition becomes how well the perform within that strict framing. That's about as interesting to watch as a spelling bee; the words are the words; either you can spell them or you can't. Sports on the other hand, everyone's handed the rules of the game, and the spectacle becomes how game-breaking an individual's earned and God-given abilities can be. Why was the NES' Tecmo Bowl's Barry Sanders so over powered? Because the actual Barry Sanders of the Detroit Lions was basically overpowered, and any given Sunday, footage of him will be more interesting to watch than some guy who's a prodigy at Tecmo Bowl.

Humans simulate what they wish to emulate. The day simulations become more desirable than reality, we will have lost something innately human. I don't mind Esports; entertainment is entertainment, but if anyone believes there will ever come a day when they'll be on par with excelling at the human condition, they're out of their mind.

Most Likely, it's all a matter of Time + Normalization.

 

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